18:10
TED2001

Eva Zeisel: The playful search for beauty

エヴァ・ザイゼル: 遊び心と美の探求について

Filmed:

陶磁器作家のエヴァ・ザイゼルが75年に渡る仕事を振り返ります。1926年当初と変わらない鮮度を今日の作品(最新ラインは08年に発表)にもたらすものは、彼女ならではの遊び心、美的センス、そして冒険を求める気持ちでしょう。豊かで色彩に満ちた人生にまつわるお話をお楽しみください。

- Designer
The legendary Eva Zeisel worked as a ceramics designer -- whose curvy, sensual pieces bring delight and elegance to tabletops around the world. Full bio

So I understand that this meeting was planned,
この つどいのテーマは
00:12
and the slogan was From Was to Still.
『過去からまだへ』 だそうですね
00:16
And I am illustrating Still.
私は 「まだ」の例で呼ばれたようだけど
00:20
Which, of course, I am not agreeing with because,
もちろん それには同意できません
00:25
although I am 94, I am not still working.
私は 94歳だけど
「まだ」仕事をしているわけではありません
00:29
And anybody who asks me, "Are you still doing this or that?"
「まだ あれをしているの?」と聞くような人には
00:33
I don't answer because I'm not doing things still, I'm doing it like I always did.
返事すらしない まだ何かをしているのではなく
これまでと同じことをやっているだけですから
00:39
I still have -- or did I use the word still? I didn't mean that.
私はまだ・・・あら 私「まだ」って言った?
失敗したわ
00:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:52
I have my file which is called To Do. I have my plans.
私は「やるべきこと」のリストがあって
計画も立てています
00:56
I have my clients. I am doing my work like I always did.
顧客がいて
これまでと同じように仕事をしています
01:06
So this takes care of my age.
これで年齢の話はもういいわね
01:13
I want to show you my work so you know what I am doing and why I am here.
私が何をして なぜここにいるのか理解してもらうため
いくつか作品を紹介します
01:18
This was about 1925.
こちらは1925年頃の作品
01:25
All of these things were made during the last 75 years.
これらの作品は 過去75年に渡って作られました
01:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:39
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:41
But, of course, I'm working since 25,
私は1925年から働いていて
01:47
doing more or less what you see here. This is Castleton China.
ここでお目にかけているようなものを手がけました
これはキャッスルトン・チャイナ
01:50
This was an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art.
こちらはニューヨーク近代美術館の展示品
01:55
This is now for sale at the Metropolitan Museum.
現在 メトロポリタン美術館で販売しているもの
02:01
This is still at the Metropolitan Museum now for sale.
これらもメトロポリタン美術館で
まだ販売されているわ
02:05
This is a portrait of my daughter and myself.
これは娘と私のポートレイト
02:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:16
These were just some of the things I've made.
私が作ってきたものの一部です
02:26
I made hundreds of them for the last 75 years.
75年もの間に何百というものを作ってきました
02:30
I call myself a maker of things.
私は自分をメーカーと呼んでいます
02:35
I don't call myself an industrial designer because I'm other things.
商業デザイナーとは呼びません
なぜなら私は違うから
02:39
Industrial designers want to make novel things.
商業デザイナーは
目新しいものを作りたがります
02:47
Novelty is a concept of commerce, not an aesthetic concept.
「目新しさ」は商業的なコンセプトで
美学的なコンセプトではありません
02:52
The industrial design magazine, I believe, is called "Innovation."
商業デザイン雑誌で
『イノベーション』というのがあります
03:01
Innovation is not part of the aim of my work.
イノベーション(革新)は
私の仕事の目的ではありません
03:09
Well, makers of things: they make things more beautiful, more elegant,
ものをつくる人は職人とは違って
より美しい よりエレガントな
03:19
more comfortable than just the craftsmen do.
より心地よいものをつくります
03:27
I have so much to say. I have to think what I am going to say.
言いたいことが沢山あるから
ちょっと考えをまとめないと
03:32
Well, to describe our profession otherwise,
私たちの職業は言うならば
03:37
we are actually concerned with the playful search for beauty.
美を探求する遊び心を持つということ
03:41
That means the playful search for beauty was called the first activity of Man.
遊びながら美を探ることは
人類の最初の行動であると言われています
03:48
Sarah Smith, who was a mathematics professor at MIT, wrote,
MIT(マサチューセッツ工科大学)の
数学教授だったサラ・スミスは
03:57
"The playful search for beauty was Man's first activity --
「遊びながら美を探ることは
人類の最初の行動で ―
04:03
that all useful qualities and all material qualities
使いやすい特質や
そのものの特質を活かすことは
04:10
were developed from the playful search for beauty."
遊び心をもって 美を追求することから発達した」
と言いました
04:16
These are tiles. The word, "playful" is a necessary aspect of our work
こちらはタイルで
「遊び心」は私たちの仕事に大切です
04:22
because, actually, one of our problems is that we have to make,
実は 生涯にわたって
04:29
produce, lovely things throughout all of life, and this for me is now 75 years.
素敵なものを作り出していくことは課題でした
気づけば75年間も行ってきました
04:38
So how can you, without drying up,
どうすれば ひからびることなく
04:51
make things with the same pleasure, as a gift to others, for so long?
喜びをもって 誰かのために
こんなにも長い間 ものを作ることができるでしょうか?
04:54
The playful is therefore an important part of our quality as designer.
遊び心は 私たちのデザイナーの質として
非常に重要な部分なのです
05:03
Let me tell you some about my life.
私の人生についてお話しましょう
05:16
As I said, I started to do these things 75 years ago.
先ほども言いましたが
私は75年前に ものづくりを始めました
05:21
My first exhibition in the United States
私が初めて 米国で出展したのは
05:29
was at the Sesquicentennial exhibition in 1926 --
独立宣言150年を記念した
1926年の世界博覧会で ―
05:34
that the Hungarian government sent one of my hand-drawn pieces as part of the exhibit.
ハンガリー政府が 私の手製の作品の一つを
展覧会の一部として送りました
05:39
My work actually took me through many countries,
私は自分の作品と共に様々な国に行き
05:57
and showed me a great part of the world.
世界の沢山の場所を見ることができました
06:05
This is not that they took me -- the work didn't take me --
自分が生み出した作品が
私を世界にいざなってくれたのではなく
06:08
I made the things particularly because I wanted to use them to see the world.
私が ものを作ったのは
世界を見るために それを利用したいと思ったからです
06:12
I was incredibly curious to see the world, and I made all these things,
私は世界を知ることに大変興味があって
これが ものをづくりを掻き立て
06:20
which then finally did take me to see many countries and many cultures.
最終的に 沢山の国や文化を
見せてくれました
06:28
I started as an apprentice to a Hungarian craftsman,
最初は ハンガリー人の職人の
見習いから始めました
06:35
and this taught me what the guild system was in Middle Ages.
中世のギルドシステムを学ぶことができました
06:46
The guild system: that means when I was an apprentice,
ギルドシステム つまり
私がこの世界に足を踏み入れたとき
06:54
I had to apprentice myself in order to become a pottery master.
陶芸のマイスターを目指すなら
まず見習いから始めなければならなかったのです
06:59
In my shop where I studied, or learned, there was a traditional hierarchy
私が学び 教わった工房では
伝統的なヒエラルキーがあり
07:08
of master, journeyman and learned worker, and apprentice,
マイスター 渡り職人や職人 見習い という階級で
07:21
and I worked as the apprentice.
私は見習いとして働きました
07:28
The work as an apprentice was very primitive.
見習いとしての仕事は
まったく昔ながらのものでした
07:33
That means I had to actually learn every aspect of making pottery by hand.
要するに 陶芸のすべての要素を
手で覚えなければいけませんでした
07:40
We mashed the clay with our feet when it came from the hillside.
丘の中腹から粘土が出ると
私たちは足でそれを踏みつぶし
07:49
After that, it had to be kneaded. It had to then go in, kind of, a mangle.
それを手でこねて
ドロドロにしなければいけませんでした
08:02
And then finally it was prepared for the throwing.
最後に ろくろ に乗せるための
準備をしました
08:07
And there I really worked as an apprentice.
そこでは文字通り
見習いとして働きました
08:15
My master took me to set ovens
マイスターは 私に炉の準備をさせました
08:19
because this was part of oven-making, oven-setting, in the time.
なぜなら それも当時の
陶芸づくりの 一部だったから
08:24
And finally, I had received a document
最後に 私は修了証書を受け取り
08:32
that I had accomplished my apprenticeship successfully,
見習い期間を立派に終了し
08:37
that I had behaved morally, and this document was given to me
道徳的に行動したことで
この証書が授与されたの
08:43
by the Guild of Roof-Coverers, Rail-Diggers, Oven-Setters,
屋根づくり 路線堀り 炉づくり
08:50
Chimney Sweeps and Potters.
煙突掃除 そして陶芸のギルドによってね
08:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:01
I also got at the time a workbook which explained my rights
この時に基準書をもらいました
そこには私の権利と ―
09:04
and my working conditions, and I still have that workbook.
労働環境の取り決めが説明してあって
まだ この基準書を持っています
09:10
First I set up a shop in my own garden,
手始めに 私は自宅の庭に
工房を構え
09:16
and made pottery which I sold on the marketplace in Budapest.
そこで作った陶器を
ブダペストの市場で売りました
09:21
And there I was sitting, and my then-boyfriend --
当時のボーイフレンドと一緒に
座りながらね
09:27
I didn't mean it was a boyfriend like it is meant today --
ボーイフレンドと言っても
今で言うような意味ではないのよ
09:34
but my boyfriend and I sat at the market and sold the pots.
そのボーイフレンドと私は
市場に座りながら陶器を売ったの
09:38
My mother thought that this was not very proper,
これに私の母は心配して
09:43
so she sat with us to add propriety to this activity.
行儀良く見せるために
私たちと一緒になって市場に座りました
09:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:55
However, after a while there was a new factory being built in Budapest,
でも しばらくしてブダペストに
新しい工場 ―
09:58
a pottery factory, a large one.
とても大きな陶器工場が
建設されました
10:04
And I visited it with several ladies, and asked all sorts of questions of the director.
私は数人の女性とともに そこを訪れて
工場長に様々な質問をしました
10:07
Then the director asked me, why do you ask all these questions?
工場長は どうして沢山質問してくるのか
尋ねたので
10:14
I said, I also have a pottery.
私も陶器を作っていることを話しました
10:18
So he asked me, could he please visit me, and then finally he did,
彼は 家を見に来てもいいか尋ねて
実際に訪ねて来た時
10:22
and explained to me that what I did now in my shop was an anachronism,
私が工房でやっていることは
時代錯誤で ―
10:27
that the industrial revolution had broken out,
世間では産業革命がおきたのだと
10:33
and that I rather should join the factory.
だから私も工場に入った方がいいと説得しました
10:36
There he made an art department for me where I worked for several months.
彼は 私のためにデザイン部を作って
私はそこで数ヶ月働きました
10:39
However, everybody in the factory spent his time at the art department.
ところが工場にいる皆が
デザイン部で時間を費やし
10:45
The director there said there were several women casting
工場長は 数名の女性が
私のデザインを生産していることを告げ
10:53
and producing my designs now in molds, and this was sold also to America.
米国にも出荷されたということでした
11:02
I remember that it was quite successful.
かなり成功したことを覚えています
11:10
However, the director, the chemist, model maker -- everybody --
でも工場長 化学技師 型職人
すべての人が ―
11:14
concerned himself much more with the art department --
より多くの手間と時間を
デザイン部である
11:21
that means, with my work -- than making toilets,
私の仕事に費やしていたの
トイレを生産することよりね
11:25
so finally they got a letter from the center, from the bank who owned the factory,
最終的に 工場のオーナーである銀行から
本部を通して手紙が来て
11:29
saying, make toilet-setting behind the art department, and that was my end.
「トイレの生産に力を入れるように」という通達で
私の仕事は終わりました
11:37
So this gave me the possibility because now I was a journeyman,
それによって 渡り職人だった私には
可能性が与えられた
11:43
and journeymen also take their satchel and go to see the world.
渡り職人は 鞄を肩に
外の世界に出かけるものでしょう
11:47
So as a journeyman, I put an ad into the paper that I had studied,
私は職人として
新聞に広告を出しました
11:53
that I was a down-to-earth potter's journeyman
訓練を受けた
堅実な陶器職人であり
11:59
and I was looking for a job as a journeyman.
渡り職人として 仕事を探しているという
広告です
12:03
And I got several answers, and I accepted the one
いくつか もらったオファーの中から
選んだのは
12:06
which was farthest from home and practically, I thought, halfway to America.
家から一番離れていて 当時の私にとっては
米国までの半分の道のりのように思えた
12:11
And that was in Hamburg.
ハンブルグでの仕事でした
12:17
Then I first took this job in Hamburg, at an art pottery
ハンブルグでの初仕事は
芸術的な陶器作りで
12:20
where everything was done on the wheel,
すべてが ろくろ で行われ
12:28
and so I worked in a shop where there were several potters.
何人かの陶器作家と一緒に
工房で働きました
12:31
And the first day, I was coming to take my place at the turntable --
最初の日 ろくろ がある
自分の場所に座ろうとしたところ ―
12:38
there were three or four turntables -- and one of them, behind where I was sitting,
部屋には 数個の ろくろ があって
私の後ろに ―
12:48
was a hunchback, a deaf-mute hunchback, who smelled very bad.
せむし男が座っていました
耳と口が不自由で とても臭い人でした
12:57
So I doused him in cologne every day, which he thought was very nice,
そこで 彼に香水を毎日 大量に振りかけたら
とても好意的に受け取ったようで
13:04
and therefore he brought bread and butter every day,
毎日 パンとバターを
持ってきてくれました
13:11
which I had to eat out of courtesy.
もちろん私は礼儀として
いただきました
13:16
The first day I came to work in this shop
この工房で働き始めた初日に
13:19
there was on my wheel a surprise for me.
私の ろくろ にサプライズの贈り物が
置いてありました
13:23
My colleagues had thoughtfully put on the wheel where I was supposed to work
私が使うことになる ろくろに
同僚たちは いみじくも―
13:30
a very nicely modeled natural man's organs.
とても上手に象られた
男性器の陶器を置いてくれたのです
13:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:48
After I brushed them off with a hand motion, they were very --
私が それを片手で払いのけると
13:54
I finally was now accepted, and worked there for some six months.
やっと一員として認めてくれて
そこで半年ほど仕事をしました
13:59
This was my first job.
これが私の最初の仕事でした
14:06
If I go on like this, you will be here till midnight.
この調子でいったら
きっと真夜中になってしまいますね
14:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:17
So I will try speed it up a little
では もう少し早く話さないとね
14:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:24
Moderator: Eva, we have about five minutes.
司会者: エヴァ 残り時間5分ほどです
14:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:28
Eva Zeisel: Are you sure?
エヴァ・ザイゼル: あら 本当?
14:33
Moderator: Yes, I am sure.
司会者: ええ 本当です
14:36
EZ: Well, if you are sure,
あなたが そう言うのなら
14:39
I have to tell you that within five minutes I will talk very fast.
あと5分で伝えなくてはいけないから
早口でいくわね
14:41
And actually, my work took me to many countries
事実 仕事が沢山の国へ
いざなってくれました
14:46
because I used my work to fill my curiosity.
私は自分の好奇心を満たすことに
仕事を利用していたからです
14:54
And among other things, other countries I worked, was in the Soviet Union,
様々な国で仕事をしましたが
ある時は旧ソビエト連邦に行って
14:59
where I worked from '32 to '37 -- actually, to '36.
1932年から1937年・・・
正しくは1936年までいました
15:06
I was finally there, although I had nothing to do -- I was a foreign expert.
やっと辿り着いたものの やることがありませんでした
私は外国人エキスパートとして迎えられ
15:14
I became art director of the china and glass industry,
陶器とガラス産業の
アート・ディレクターになりました
15:20
and eventually under Stalin's purges -- at the beginning of Stalin's purges,
やがて スターリンの抑圧下になり
スターリンの粛清当初は
15:23
I didn't know that hundreds of thousands of innocent people were arrested.
何百 何千という罪のない人々が
逮捕されたことを知りませんでした
15:34
So I was arrested quite early in Stalin's purges,
私もスターリンの粛清の
早い段階で逮捕され
15:40
and spent 16 months in a Russian prison.
ロシアの監獄で16ヶ月を過ごしました
15:45
The accusation was that I had successfully prepared an Attentat on Stalin's life.
逮捕理由は私がスターリンの生命を脅かす
計画に加担したもので
15:53
This was a very dangerous accusation.
とても危険な告発でした
16:01
And if this is the end of my five minutes, I want to tell you that
ここで私に残された5分間が終わってしまうので
最後に言いたいのは
16:07
I actually did survive, which was a surprise.
私が 事実 生き延びたことは驚きでした
16:14
But since I survived and I'm here,
生き延びて ここに来ることができました
16:21
and since this is the end of the five minutes, I will --
さて これで5分が過ぎてしまったようね
16:24
Moderator: Tell me when your last trip to Russia was.
司会者: 最後にロシアを訪れたのはいつですか
16:28
Weren't you there recently?
最近行かれたのではありませんか
16:30
EZ: Oh, this summer, in fact,
ええ 今年の夏でした
16:32
the Lomonosov factory was bought by an American company, invited me.
ロモノソフ工場が米国企業に買収されて
私を招待してくれました
16:35
They found out that I had worked in '33 at this factory,
私が この工場で1933年に働いていたことを知って
16:47
and they came to my studio in Rockland County,
ロックランド郡にある 私のスタジオに
16:51
and brought the 15 of their artists to visit me here.
15人ものアーティストを連れて
会いにきてくれました
16:58
And they invited myself to come to the Russian factory last summer,
昨年の7月でしたが
お皿をいくつか作ったり デザインするために
17:04
in July, to make some dishes, design some dishes.
私をロシアの工場に招いてくれるということでした
17:10
And since I don't like to travel alone, they also invited my daughter,
私は一人で旅行をするのが好きではないので
娘も招待してくれました
17:15
son-in-law and granddaughter,
義理の息子と孫娘もね
17:23
so we had a lovely trip to see Russia today,
現代のロシアを見物して
素敵な旅行でした
17:25
which is not a very pleasant and happy view.
あまり 愉しくも幸せでもない風景でしたけどね
17:30
Here I am now, if this is the end? Thank you.
さあ もう終わりかしら?
どうもありがとう
17:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:40
Translated by Mika Akutsu
Reviewed by Mari Arimitsu

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Eva Zeisel - Designer
The legendary Eva Zeisel worked as a ceramics designer -- whose curvy, sensual pieces bring delight and elegance to tabletops around the world.

Why you should listen

Young Eva Zeisel was driven by two desires: to make beautiful things, and to see the world. Her long and legendary career in ceramics helped her do both. Born in Budapest in 1906, she apprenticed to a guild of potters as a teenager, then worked in Germany and later Russia (where she was imprisoned by Stalin for 16 months) and Vienna. Landing in New York in 1938 with her husband Hans, Zeisel began her second design career.

In the American postwar period, Zeisel's work simply defined the era. Organic shapes, toned colors, a sense of fun and play -- her Town and Country line for Red Wing in particular evokes an urbane early-1950s kitchen where you'd be likely to get an excellent cup of coffee and some good conversation.

Zeisel took a break from design in the 1960s and 1970s, returning to the scene in the 1980s as interest in her older work revived. But as she collected lifetime achievement awards and saw centenary exhibitions open and close, she didn't simply rehash her older work for the repro crowd -- instead branching out into glassware and furniture. Zeisel died in late 2011 at the age of 105.

More profile about the speaker
Eva Zeisel | Speaker | TED.com