sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2005

Richard Dawkins: Why the universe seems so strange

ドーキンスが語る「奇妙な」宇宙

July 7, 2005

生物学者のリチャード・ドーキンスが、人間の視点から宇宙を理解することが どれほど難しいか考えながら「ありえないことを想像する」ことについて論じます。

Richard Dawkins - Evolutionary biologist
Oxford professor Richard Dawkins has helped steer evolutionary science into the 21st century, and his concept of the "meme" contextualized the spread of ideas in the information age. In recent years, his devastating critique of religion has made him a leading figure in the New Atheism. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
My title: "Queerer than we can suppose: The strangeness of science."
この講演に「想像できないほど奇妙な科学の不思議さ」と名付けました
00:25
"Queerer than we can suppose" comes from J.B.S. Haldane,
「想像できないほど奇妙な」という一節は
00:31
the famous biologist, who said, "Now, my own suspicion is
有名な生物学者J.B.S.ホールデンのものです。
00:34
that the universe is not only queerer than we suppose,
「宇宙は我々が想像しているよりも奇妙なのはもちろんのこと、...
00:38
but queerer than we can suppose.
...我々の想像する能力を越えて奇妙なのではないだろうか」
00:42
I suspect that there are more things in heaven and earth
「おそらく、どんな哲学が夢見た、そして夢見れるものよりも
00:44
than are dreamed of, or can be dreamed of, in any philosophy."
奇妙なものが天や地にはあるだろう」とホールデンは言っています
00:47
Richard Feynman compared the accuracy of quantum theories --
物理学者リチャード=ファインマンは、量子論により実測結果を予測することを
00:53
experimental predictions -- to specifying the width of North America
「北アメリカ大陸の幅を
00:58
to within one hair's breadth of accuracy.
髪の毛一本分の誤差範囲内で特定するぐらい正確だ」と例えています
01:03
This means that quantum theory has got to be in some sense true.
このことから、量子論はある意味で真実だと言えるでしょう
01:07
Yet the assumptions that quantum theory needs to make
しかし、この正確な予測のために必要な仮定は
01:12
in order to deliver those predictions are so mysterious
とても不可解なものなのです
01:14
that even Feynman himself was moved to remark,
ファインマン彼自身このように言っています
01:18
"If you think you understand quantum theory,
「もしも量子力学を理解できたと思ったならば...
01:21
you don't understand quantum theory."
...それは量子力学を理解できていない証拠だ」
01:24
It's so queer that physicists resort to one or another
あまりにも奇妙なので、物理学者は
01:27
paradoxical interpretation of it.
いろいろな逆説的な解釈をしなければならないほどです
01:32
David Deutsch, who's talking here, in "The Fabric of Reality,"
この場で講演することになっているデイヴィッド=ドイッチェは
01:34
embraces the "many worlds" interpretation of quantum theory,
著書「世界の究極理論は存在するか」で量子力学の「多世界解釈」を容認しています
01:39
because the worst that you can say about it is
なぜなら「多世界解釈」について言えるのは、悪くても
01:45
that it's preposterously wasteful.
途方もなく無駄が多いことだけだからです
01:47
It postulates a vast and rapidly growing number of universes
この解釈では、無数の、そして急速に増加する宇宙が
01:49
existing in parallel -- mutually undetectable except through
並行して存在すると主張します
01:54
the narrow porthole of quantum mechanical experiments.
しかしそれらは量子力学の実験を通した小さな覗き窓からしか互いの存在を検知できません
01:58
And that's Richard Feynman.
ファインマンの話は以上です
02:04
The biologist Lewis Wolpert
生物学者 ルイス=ウォルパートは
02:07
believes that the queerness of modern physics
現代物理学の奇妙な点は
02:10
is just an extreme example. Science, as opposed to technology,
極端な例の一端に過ぎないと信じています
02:12
does violence to common sense.
科学はテクノロジーと違い常識を裏切ります
02:16
Every time you drink a glass of water, he points out,
彼が指摘するには、あなたがコップ一杯の水を飲むごとに
02:19
the odds are that you will imbibe at least one molecule
オリバー=クロムウェルの膀胱を通過した分子を
02:23
that passed through the bladder of Oliver Cromwell. (Laughter)
少なくともひとつは吸収するだろうというのです
02:26
It's just elementary probability theory.
これは初歩の確率の問題に過ぎません
02:31
The number of molecules per glassful is hugely greater
一杯のコップに含まれるの水の分子の数は
02:34
than the number of glassfuls, or bladdersful, in the world --
世界中にあるコップや膀胱の数よりも遥かに多いのです
02:38
and, of course, there's nothing special about Cromwell
もちろん、クロムウェルや膀胱が特別なのではありません
02:41
or bladders. You have just breathed in a nitrogen atom
あなたが今まさに呼吸したのは
02:44
that passed through the right lung of the third iguanodon
背の高いソテツの木の左側の3番目のイグアナドンの
02:47
to the left of the tall cycad tree.
右の肺を通過した窒素原子です
02:51
"Queerer than we can suppose."
「想像できないほど奇妙な」
02:56
What is it that makes us capable of supposing anything,
我々は、どうして想像することができるのでしょうか
03:00
and does this tell us anything about what we can suppose?
どんなことまでを想像できるのでしょうか
03:03
Are there things about the universe that will be
この宇宙には、我々より高度な知能には理解できるけれども
03:07
forever beyond our grasp, but not beyond the grasp of some
我々の理解を越えるようなことがあるでしょうか?
03:10
superior intelligence? Are there things about the universe
それとも我々の理解を越えるだけでなく
03:14
that are, in principle, ungraspable by any mind,
どんなに高等な知能であっても理解できないようなことが
03:18
however superior?
存在するのでしょうか
03:22
The history of science has been one long series
科学の歴史は突拍子もない考えの連続です
03:25
of violent brainstorms, as successive generations
それぞれの次の世代では
03:28
have come to terms with increasing levels of queerness
より奇妙さを増してゆく宇宙と
03:32
in the universe.
折り合いを付けなければなりません
03:35
We're now so used to the idea that the Earth spins --
現代の我々は、太陽が地球を回るのではなく
03:37
rather than the Sun moves across the sky -- it's hard for us to realize
地球が自転するという考えに慣れてます
03:40
what a shattering mental revolution that must have been.
それがどんな精神的な大革命だったか想像が難しいですが
03:43
After all, it seems obvious that the Earth is large and motionless,
大地が広大で静止しており太陽は小さくて動きまわるというのが
03:47
the Sun small and mobile. But it's worth recalling
とても明白に思えます しかしこの主題に対するウィトゲンシュタインの見解を
03:51
Wittgenstein's remark on the subject.
思い起こすとよいでしょう
03:55
"Tell me," he asked a friend, "why do people always say, it was natural
「なぜ、地球が自転するより
03:57
for man to assume that the sun went round the earth
...太陽が地球を回る方が自然だと
04:02
rather than that the earth was rotating?"
...みんな言うのだろう」と彼が尋ねると
04:05
His friend replied, "Well, obviously because it just looks as though
友人はこう答えました
04:09
the Sun is going round the Earth."
「そりゃもちろん太陽の方が回っているように見えるからさ」
04:12
Wittgenstein replied, "Well, what would it have looked like
「ではもし地球が自転しているとしたら
04:15
if it had looked as though the Earth was rotating?" (Laughter)
...どう見えただろうね」とウィトゲンシュタインは切り返しました
04:18
Science has taught us, against all intuition,
岩やクリスタルのように明らかに固いものが
04:27
that apparently solid things, like crystals and rocks,
直感を裏切ってほとんど空っぽの空間から出来ていると
04:30
are really almost entirely composed of empty space.
科学は我々に教えてくれました
04:33
And the familiar illustration is the nucleus of an atom is a fly
原子核は野球場の中央にいるハエだという説明があります
04:37
in the middle of a sports stadium and the next atom
その隣りにある原子は
04:43
is in the next sports stadium.
隣りの野球場に相当します
04:46
So it would seem the hardest, solidest, densest rock
ですから、どんなに固く頑丈な岩であっても
04:49
is really almost entirely empty space, broken only by tiny particles
ほとんどが空っぽの空間からできていて
04:52
so widely spaced they shouldn't count.
粒子はとてもまばらにしか存在しません
04:58
Why, then, do rocks look and feel solid and hard and impenetrable?
ではなぜ、岩は固いように感じられるのでしょうか
05:01
As an evolutionary biologist, I'd say this: our brains have evolved
進化生物学者として、私の説明はこうです
05:06
to help us survive within the orders of magnitude of size and speed
我々の脳は、体が活動するサイズと速度にあわせて生存できるように進化してきました
05:11
which our bodies operate at. We never evolved to navigate
原子の世界で生きるようには
05:17
in the world of atoms.
進化しなかったのです
05:21
If we had, our brains probably would perceive rocks
もししていたら、我々の脳は岩をほとんどからっぽの空間と認識したでしょう
05:22
as full of empty space. Rocks feel hard and impenetrable
岩が固く、手では貫けないように感じるのは
05:25
to our hands precisely because objects like rocks and hands
まさに岩石や手のような物体は
05:29
cannot penetrate each other. It's therefore useful
互いに貫くことがないからです
05:34
for our brains to construct notions like "solidity" and "impenetrability,"
ですから、我々がいる中くらいのサイズの世界を生きてゆく上で
05:38
because such notions help us to navigate our bodies through
我々の脳が「固い」とか「貫けない」といった概念を生み出すのは
05:44
the middle-sized world in which we have to navigate.
便利なことなのです
05:48
Moving to the other end of the scale, our ancestors never had to
反対に大きなスケールのことを考えると、我々の祖先は
05:52
navigate through the cosmos at speeds close to
宇宙空間を光速に近い速度で移動する必要はありませんでした
05:56
the speed of light. If they had, our brains would be much better
もし必要だったら、アインシュタインを理解するのも簡単だったでしょう
05:59
at understanding Einstein. I want to give the name "Middle World"
我々が活動し進化してきたこの中くらいの大きさの世界を
06:03
to the medium-scaled environment in which we've evolved
「 中ほどの国」と名付けたいと思います。
06:08
the ability to take act -- nothing to do with Middle Earth.
指輪物語の「中つ国」とは...
06:11
Middle World. (Laughter)
...関係ありません。「中ほどの国」です
06:13
We are evolved denizens of Middle World, and that limits
我々はこの「中ほどの国」で進化してきました
06:17
what we are capable of imagining. We find it intuitively easy
そしてそのことが我々の想像力を制約します
06:21
to grasp ideas like, when a rabbit moves at the sort of
兎が「中ほどの国」の物体が動くような「中ほど」の速度で動いていて
06:25
medium velocity at which rabbits and other Middle World objects move,
別の「中ほどの国」の物体である岩がぶつかったら
06:28
and hits another Middle World object, like a rock, it knocks itself out.
失神する、と直感で簡単に想像できます
06:32
May I introduce Major General Albert Stubblebine III,
アルバート=スタブルバイン三世のことを紹介しましょう
06:38
commander of military intelligence in 1983.
彼は1983年に陸軍情報部少将でした
06:44
He stared at his wall in Arlington, Virginia, and decided to do it.
彼はヴァージニア州アーリントンでオフィスの壁を睨んで決断しました
06:49
As frightening as the prospect was, he was going into the next office.
なんと、彼は隣りのオフィスへ行くというのです
06:54
He stood up, and moved out from behind his desk.
彼は立ち上がって机を背にします
07:00
What is the atom mostly made of? he thought. Space.
彼は考えました「原子はほとんどが空っぽの空間でできている」
07:05
He started walking. What am I mostly made of? Atoms.
彼は歩き始めました「私は何でできている? 原子だ」
07:09
He quickened his pace, almost to a jog now.
彼は歩調を早めて小走りになりました
07:15
What is the wall mostly made of? Atoms.
「壁は何でできている?原子だ」
07:18
All I have to do is merge the spaces.
「私がやるべきことは、空っぽの空間を合せるだけだ」
07:23
Then, General Stubblebine banged his nose hard on the wall
そして少将は、鼻を壁に強くぶつけたのです
07:27
of his office. Stubblebine, who commanded 16,000 soldiers,
16000人の兵士を率いるスタブルバイン少将は
07:32
was confounded by his continual failure to walk through the wall.
どうしても壁を通り抜けられずに困惑していました
07:38
He has no doubt that this ability will, one day, be a common tool
彼はこの能力がいつの日か一般的な軍事手段になると信じていました
07:42
in the military arsenal. Who would screw around with an army
そんなことが本当にできるなら誰も軍を馬鹿にはしないでしょう
07:45
that could do that? That's from an article in Playboy,
これはプレイボーイで読んだ記事なのですが
07:48
which I was reading the other day. (Laughter)
私にはこれが真実だと信じる理由があります
07:53
I have every reason to think it's true; I was reading Playboy
実は私の記事もそこに載っていたので
07:56
because I, myself, had an article in it. (Laughter)
プレイボーイを読んでいたんです
07:59
Unaided human intuition schooled in Middle World
「中ほどの国」で学んだ人間の直感では
08:07
finds it hard to believe Galileo when he tells us
空気抵抗がなければ重い物体と軽い物体は
08:12
a heavy object and a light object, air friction aside,
同時に落下するというガリレオの教えは
08:15
would hit the ground at the same instant.
信じるのが難しいものです
08:19
And that's because in Middle World, air friction is always there.
それは「中ほどの国」では空気抵抗は常に存在するからです
08:20
If we'd evolved in a vacuum, we would expect them
我々が真空中で進化したなら、同時だと思うでしょう
08:24
to hit the ground simultaneously. If we were bacteria,
また我々がバクテリアだったとしたら
08:27
constantly buffeted by thermal movements of molecules,
常に分子の熱運動に常に揺さぶられているので
08:30
it would be different,
違う予想でしょう
08:33
but we Middle Worlders are too big to notice Brownian motion.
しかし「中ほどの国」の住人はブラウン運動を感じるには大きすぎます
08:35
In the same way, our lives are dominated by gravity
そしてまた我々の生活は重力によって支配されています
08:39
but are almost oblivious to the force of surface tension.
一方、表面張力のことはあまり気にしません
08:42
A small insect would reverse these priorities.
小さな虫ではこの優先順序は逆です
08:46
Steve Grand -- he's the one on the left,
写真の左、スティーブ=グランドは
08:50
Douglas Adams is on the right -- Steve Grand, in his book,
...右はダグラス=アダムズですが... スティーブ=グランドは著書
08:52
"Creation: Life and How to Make It," is positively scathing
「創造: 生とその作成」のなかで我々の物質への先入観を
08:55
about our preoccupation with matter itself.
肯定的に捉えています
08:59
We have this tendency to think that only solid, material things
我々は固い、実体をもったものだけが真の「物」だと考えがちです
09:03
are really things at all. Waves of electromagnetic fluctuation
真空中の電磁気の揺らぎによる波などは
09:07
in a vacuum seem unreal.
実在とは思えません
09:12
Victorians thought the waves had to be waves in some material medium:
18世紀の人々は、波には波を伝える物質、エーテルが必要だと考えていました
09:15
the ether. But we find real matter comforting only because
しかし我々にとって物質という概念が分かりやすいのは
09:20
we've evolved to survive in Middle World,
物質を想定することが生存に便利であるような
09:24
where matter is a useful fiction.
「中ほどの国」で進化したからに過ぎないのです
09:28
A whirlpool, for Steve Grand, is a thing with just as much reality
グランドにとっては渦巻も岩と同じくらいに
09:31
as a rock.
実在のものなのです
09:35
In a desert plain in Tanzania, in the shadow of the volcano
タンザニアの砂漠、オル=ドニョ=レンガイ火山のふもとに
09:38
Ol Donyo Lengai, there's a dune made of volcanic ash.
火山灰でできた砂丘があります
09:42
The beautiful thing is that it moves bodily.
なんとその砂丘は丸ごと移動します
09:46
It's what's technically known as a "barchan," and the entire dune
砂漠を横切って砂丘がそっくり西の方角へ
09:50
walks across the desert in a westerly direction
年間およそ17メートルの速度で移動するこの砂丘は
09:53
at a speed of about 17 meters per year.
「バルハン」と言われています
09:56
It retains its crescent shape and moves in the direction of the horns.
砂丘は三日月の形を保ったまま、ツノの方向へと移動します
10:00
What happens is that the wind blows the sand
風が砂をなだらかな斜面に沿って吹き上げて
10:04
up the shallow slope on the other side, and then,
そして砂は砂丘の頂上を越えて反対側
10:07
as each sand grain hits the top of the ridge,
つまり三日月の凹の側へと
10:10
it cascades down on the inside of the crescent,
すべり落ちるのです
10:11
and so the whole horn-shaped dune moves.
そして全体として三日月形の砂丘が移動します
10:14
Steve Grand points out that you and I are, ourselves,
スティーブ=グランドは、我々も永続するものではなくて
10:20
more like a wave than a permanent thing.
波のようなものだと言います
10:23
He invites us, the reader, to "think of an experience
「子供時代のことを考えて下さい」
10:27
from your childhood -- something you remember clearly,
「何かはっきりした記憶」
10:30
something you can see, feel, maybe even smell,
「そこにいるかのように鮮明な、映像、感触...」
10:33
as if you were really there.
...あるいは匂い」
10:36
After all, you really were there at the time, weren't you?
「実際、あなたはその時代、そこにいたのですから」
10:37
How else would you remember it?
「だから記憶があるのですよね?」
10:41
But here is the bombshell: You weren't there.
「衝撃でしょうが、実は違うのです」
10:43
Not a single atom that is in your body today was there
「あなたの体を構成する原子はひとつとして...
10:46
when that event took place. Matter flows from place to place
...その記憶の時代のものとは同じではありません」
10:49
and momentarily comes together to be you.
「物質は移動しながら少しの間だけあなたを構成します」
10:53
Whatever you are, therefore, you are not the stuff
「ですから、あなたの実体とあなたを構成する物質は...
10:56
of which you are made.
...関係ないのです」
10:59
If that doesn't make the hair stand up on the back of your neck,
「この重要な事実に、毛が逆立たないのならば...
11:02
read it again until it does, because it is important."
...もう一度、読み返して下さい」
11:04
So "really" isn't a word that we should use with simple confidence.
つまり「現実に」という言葉は、軽々しく使うべきではないのです
11:09
If a neutrino had a brain,
もしもニュートリノが脳を持っていたなら
11:14
which it evolved in neutrino-sized ancestors,
ニュートリノの大きさの祖先から進化したのですから
11:16
it would say that rocks really do consist of empty space.
岩なんてほとんどからっぽだ、と言うことでしょう
11:19
We have brains that evolved in medium-sized ancestors
我々の脳は、岩を通り抜けられない、中ほどの大きさの祖先から
11:24
which couldn't walk through rocks.
進化したのです
11:26
"Really," for an animal, is whatever its brain needs it to be
生存をする上で脳が必要とすることは
11:29
in order to assist its survival,
何であれ「現実」です
11:33
and because different species live in different worlds,
違った種は違った世界に住んでいるのですから
11:36
there will be a discomforting variety of "really"s.
そこには受け入れがたい様々な現実が存在するのです
11:39
What we see of the real world is not the unvarnished world
我々が見ている現実世界は、ありのままの世界ではありません
11:45
but a model of the world, regulated and adjusted by sense data,
現実世界に対処しやすいように調整され構成された
11:49
but constructed so it's useful for dealing with the real world.
感覚データによる世界のモデルなのです
11:54
The nature of the model depends on the kind of animal we are.
モデルの性質はどんな動物かによって変わります
11:58
A flying animal needs a different kind of model
飛ぶ動物は、歩き、登り、あるいは泳ぐ動物とは
12:02
from a walking, climbing or swimming animal.
違った種類のモデルが必要です
12:05
A monkey's brain must have software capable of simulating
猿の頭脳は枝や幹からなる三次元の世界をシミュレートする
12:08
a three-dimensional world of branches and trunks.
ソフトウェアを持っていることでしょう
12:13
A mole's software for constructing models of its world
モグラが世界をモデル化するソフトウェアは
12:16
will be customized for underground use.
地下の生活に適合しているでしょう
12:19
A water strider's brain doesn't need 3D software at all,
エドウィン=アボット著「平面世界の住人」のように
12:22
since it lives on the surface of the pond
アメンボは池の水面に暮らしているので
12:26
in an Edwin Abbott flatland.
三次元のソフトウェアは不要でしょう
12:28
I've speculated that bats may see color with their ears.
私は、コウモリは耳で色を見れるのではないかと思っています
12:32
The world model that a bat needs in order to navigate
コウモリは、日中に飛ぶツバメのような鳥と同じように
12:37
through three dimensions catching insects
虫を捕まえるために三次元空間を飛びまわるので
12:40
must be pretty similar to the world model that any flying bird,
コウモリの世界のモデルは
12:42
a day-flying bird like a swallow, needs to perform
空を飛ぶ鳥のモデルと非常に似ているに
12:45
the same kind of tasks.
違いありません
12:48
The fact that the bat uses echoes in pitch darkness
コウモリが暗闇で音の反響を使って現状をモデルに入力し
12:50
to input the current variables to its model,
一方でツバメが光を使っているのは
12:53
while the swallow uses light, is incidental.
状況に応じた違いにすぎません
12:56
Bats, I've even suggested, use perceived hues, such as red and blue,
さらに、ツバメや人間が赤や青などの色によって
12:59
as labels, internal labels, for some useful aspect of echoes --
波長の長短を区別するのと同じように
13:04
perhaps the acoustic texture of surfaces, furry or smooth and so on,
コウモリは感じた色あいを
13:11
in the same way as swallows or, indeed, we, use those
音響的に「ふわふわした」とか「滑らかな」など
13:15
perceived hues -- redness and blueness etc. --
表面の質感を区別するために
13:19
to label long and short wavelengths of light.
使っていると思います
13:22
There's nothing inherent about red that makes it long wavelength.
赤が長い波長であることに特別な意味はありません
13:24
And the point is that the nature of the model is governed by
重要なのは、モデルの性質が知覚の種別で決まるのではなく
13:29
how it is to be used, rather than by the sensory modality involved.
それがどう使われるかで決まるということです
13:31
J. B .S. Haldane himself had something to say about animals
ホールデンは、ニオイが重要な役割を果す動物の世界についても
13:38
whose world is dominated by smell.
意見を持っていました
13:41
Dogs can distinguish two very similar fatty acids, extremely diluted:
極めて濃度の低いよく似た脂肪酸、カプリル酸とカプロン酸を
13:44
caprylic acid and caproic acid.
犬は区別することができます
13:49
The only difference, you see, is that one has an extra pair of
その違いは、見てのとおり一方は炭素原子がひとつ余計に
13:52
carbon atoms in the chain.
多いだけです
13:55
Haldane guesses that a dog would probably be able to place the acids
ホールデンの推測では、人間がピアノの弦の長さを
13:57
in the order of their molecular weights by their smells,
その音程によって感じられるのと同じように
14:01
just as a man could place a number of piano wires
犬もニオイによって脂肪酸の分子量を
14:05
in the order of their lengths by means of their notes.
感じられるだろう、というのです
14:08
Now, there's another fatty acid, capric acid,
実はカプリン酸というもうひとつの似た
14:12
which is just like the other two,
脂肪酸があります
14:16
except that it has two more carbon atoms.
違いは炭素原子がふたつ多いだけです
14:17
A dog that had never met capric acid would, perhaps,
我々が過去に聞いたことのあるトランペットの音よりも
14:20
have no more trouble imagining its smell than we would have trouble
ひとつ高い音程の音を想像できるのと同じように
14:23
imagining a trumpet, say, playing one note higher
カプリン酸に出会ったことがない犬でも
14:28
than we've heard a trumpet play before.
簡単にそのニオイを想像できるでしょう
14:31
Perhaps dogs and rhinos and other smell-oriented animals
もしかしたらコウモリのときの議論と同じように
14:36
smell in color. And the argument would be
犬やサイのような嗅覚中心の動物は
14:41
exactly the same as for the bats.
ニオイで色を感じるかもしれません。
14:44
Middle World -- the range of sizes and speeds
我々が進化して本能的に扱えるようになった
14:48
which we have evolved to feel intuitively comfortable with --
「中ほどの国」での大きさや速度の範囲は
14:52
is a bit like the narrow range of the electromagnetic spectrum
種々の色として見える光の波長域に少し似て
14:55
that we see as light of various colors.
狭いと言えるでしょう
14:59
We're blind to all frequencies outside that,
その外側の波長は特別な測定器を使わないと
15:02
unless we use instruments to help us.
我々には見ることができません
15:04
Middle World is the narrow range of reality
奇妙に思える微小、巨大な、または超高速の世界に対し
15:09
which we judge to be normal, as opposed to the queerness
我々が普通だと判断する「中ほどの国」というのは
15:12
of the very small, the very large and the very fast.
狭い範囲の現実でしかないのです
15:15
We could make a similar scale of improbabilities;
確率についても似たようなことが言えます
15:20
nothing is totally impossible.
どんなことも、全く不可能ではありません
15:23
Miracles are just events that are extremely improbable.
奇跡的な出来事というのは、極めて確率が低いだけなのです
15:25
A marble statue could wave its hand at us; the atoms that make up
大理石の彫像も、それを構成する原子があちこちへ振動してるのですから
15:29
its crystalline structure are all vibrating back and forth anyway.
もしかしたら手を振ることがあるかもしれません
15:33
Because there are so many of them,
しかし原子の数は非常に多く、
15:37
and because there's no agreement among them
それぞれバラバラの方向に動いているので
15:39
in their preferred direction of movement, the marble,
「中ほどの国」で我々が見る大理石は
15:41
as we see it in Middle World, stays rock steady.
岩のように動かないのです
15:44
But the atoms in the hand could all just happen to move
しかし、彫像の手を構成する原子が
15:47
the same way at the same time, and again and again.
偶然、同時に同じように繰り返し動いたらどうでしょう
15:49
In this case, the hand would move and we'd see it waving at us
我々に向って手を振ることがあるかも知れません
15:52
in Middle World. The odds against it, of course, are so great
もちろんそんな確率は非常に低く
15:56
that if you set out writing zeros at the time of
その数字を書いたとしたら
16:00
the origin of the universe, you still would not have
宇宙の始まりから現在までゼロを書き続けたとしても
16:03
written enough zeros to this day.
まだ足りないくらいです
16:06
Evolution in Middle World has not equipped us to handle
「中ほどの国」での進化した我々は寿命が短いので
16:12
very improbable events; we don't live long enough.
非常に可能性が低い事象をうまく扱えません
16:13
In the vastness of astronomical space and geological time,
広大な天文学的な空間と地質学的な時間の中では
16:16
that which seems impossible in Middle World
「中ほどの国」では不可能に思えることさえも
16:21
might turn out to be inevitable.
不可避かも知れないのです
16:24
One way to think about that is by counting planets.
そのひとつの例として惑星の数を数えてみましょう
16:28
We don't know how many planets there are in the universe,
どれほどの惑星がこの宇宙にあるのかわかりませんが
16:32
but a good estimate is about 10 to the 20, or 100 billion billion.
10の20乗すなわち1000億の10億個くらいだと推測されています
16:34
And that gives us a nice way to express our estimate
そこから生命がどれくらいの確率で存在するか
16:38
of life's improbability.
推測ができます
16:41
Could make some sort of landmark points
そして先程取り上げた電磁波の波長のスペクトルのように
16:44
along a spectrum of improbability, which might look like
確率のスペクトルの中のどこが傑出しているか
16:46
the electromagnetic spectrum we just looked at.
考えることができます
16:49
If life has arisen only once on any --
もしも生命が惑星ひとつに一回づつ生まれたら
16:54
if -- if life could -- I mean, life could originate once per planet,
生命はとてもありふれていることになります
16:58
could be extremely common, or it could originate once per star,
恒星ひとつにつき、あるいは銀河につき一回かもしれないし
17:01
or once per galaxy or maybe only once in the entire universe,
もしかしたら宇宙全体で一回だけ、
17:06
in which case it would have to be here. And somewhere up there
つまりここにいる私達かも知れません
17:11
would be the chance that a frog would turn into a prince
その中には、カエルが王子様に変身するような
17:14
and similar magical things like that.
魔法が起きる可能性も含まれるでしょう
17:16
If life has arisen on only one planet in the entire universe,
もしも生命が発生した惑星が全宇宙でひとつだけなら
17:20
that planet has to be our planet, because here we are talking about it.
その惑星とはこうして話をしている我々がいる地球のことです
17:24
And that means that if we want to avail ourselves of it,
ですから生命の誕生が100億の10億倍くらい
17:28
we're allowed to postulate chemical events in the origin of life
めずらしい科学的現象だろうと
17:31
which have a probability as low as one in 100 billion billion.
推測するのも妥当なことです
17:35
I don't think we shall have to avail ourselves of that,
しかし私は生命はありふれていると思うので
17:39
because I suspect that life is quite common in the universe.
それが正しい考え方とは思えません
17:42
And when I say quite common, it could still be so rare
ありふれてるとは言っても、残念なことですが、
17:45
that no one island of life ever encounters another,
異なる生命同士がお互いに出会うことがない程度には
17:48
which is a sad thought.
稀かも知れません
17:52
How shall we interpret "queerer than we can suppose?"
「想像できないほど奇妙な」ことをどう解釈すれば良いのでしょう
17:55
Queerer than can in principle be supposed,
原理的に想像することができないことなのか
17:58
or just queerer than we can suppose, given the limitations
それとも単に「中ほどの国」で進化した我々の
18:01
of our brain's evolutionary apprenticeship in Middle World?
脳の限界を越えているだけなのでしょうか?
18:04
Could we, by training and practice, emancipate ourselves
訓練すれば「中ほどの国」の思考を抜け出して
18:09
from Middle World and achieve some sort of intuitive,
数学的だけではなく直感的に
18:12
as well as mathematical, understanding of the very small
極微小な、または巨大な世界を理解できるのでしょうか?
18:15
and the very large? I genuinely don't know the answer.
私には全く分かりません
18:18
I wonder whether we might help ourselves to understand, say,
もしかすると小さな子供のころから
18:22
quantum theory, if we brought up children to play computer games,
例えば量子論の世界をコンピュータゲームで遊ぶことが
18:25
beginning in early childhood, which had a sort of
理解の助けになるかも知れません
18:29
make-believe world of balls going through two slits on a screen,
ボールが二つのスリットを同時に通り抜けるような
18:32
a world in which the strange goings on of quantum mechanics
奇妙なことが起きる量子力学の世界を
18:34
were enlarged by the computer's make-believe,
コンピュータで「中ほどの国」の大きさに
18:37
so that they became familiar on the Middle-World scale of the stream.
拡大して親しみやすくするのです
18:40
And, similarly, a relativistic computer game in which
スクリーン上の物体がローレンツ収縮を起すような
18:44
objects on the screen manifest the Lorenz Contraction, and so on,
相対論的なコンピュータゲームでは
18:47
to try to get ourselves into the way of thinking --
相対論的考え方を我々に…
18:52
get children into the way of thinking about it.
子供たちに身に付けさせられるかも知れません
18:54
I want to end by applying the idea of Middle World
最後に「中ほどの国」のアイデアを我々をお互いの
18:57
to our perceptions of each other.
認知について当てはめてみましょう
19:01
Most scientists today subscribe to a mechanistic view of the mind:
今日の科学者の大半は、精神を機械論的にとらえています
19:04
we're the way we are because our brains are wired up as they are;
脳の配線やホルモンによって、我々がどんな存在であるかが
19:08
our hormones are the way they are.
決まると言うのです
19:12
We'd be different, our characters would be different,
そして神経構造や生理化学が異なれば
19:13
if our neuro-anatomy and our physiological chemistry were different.
個性も異なると言います
19:15
But we scientists are inconsistent. If we were consistent,
しかし、我々科学者は矛盾しています
19:20
our response to a misbehaving person, like a child-murderer,
例えば、幼児殺害犯のような異常行動をする人間に対し
19:24
should be something like, this unit has a faulty component;
「この部品は故障してるから修理が必要だ」
19:27
it needs repairing. That's not what we say.
というような反応はしません
19:30
What we say -- and I include the most austerely mechanistic among us,
我々は、たとえ私のように極端な
19:33
which is probably me --
人間機械論者であっても
19:37
what we say is, "Vile monster, prison is too good for you."
「この怪物め、地獄へ落ちろ」という反応をします
19:38
Or worse, we seek revenge, in all probability thereby triggering
あるいはもっと悪いことに復讐が引き金となって、いま世界中で見るように
19:42
the next phase in an escalating cycle of counter-revenge,
エスカレートしてゆく復讐の連鎖が
19:46
which we see, of course, all over the world today.
発生するかも知れません
19:49
In short, when we're thinking like academics,
つまり、研究者として考える場合は
19:52
we regard people as elaborate and complicated machines,
人をコンピュータや車のような複雑な機械として扱います
19:55
like computers or cars, but when we revert to being human
しかし人間の立場へ戻ると
19:58
we behave more like Basil Fawlty, who, we remember,
まるでコメディ「フォルティ=タワーズ」のバシル=フォルティのように
20:03
thrashed his car to teach it a lesson when it wouldn't start
夕食会の日に車が動かないとひっぱたいて
20:06
on gourmet night. (Laughter)
お仕置きをするのです
20:09
The reason we personify things like cars and computers
我々が車やコンピュータのようなものを擬人化するのは
20:13
is that just as monkeys live in an arboreal world
猿が樹上の世界で、モグラは地下の世界で
20:16
and moles live in an underground world
そしてアメンボが表面張力が支配する世界で
20:19
and water striders live in a surface tension-dominated flatland,
生きているのと同じように、我々が社会的な世界で生きているからです
20:22
we live in a social world. We swim through a sea of people --
我々は人々の海を泳いでいるのです
20:26
a social version of Middle World.
「中ほどの国」の社会的なバージョンです
20:30
We are evolved to second-guess the behavior of others
我々は進化によって優秀な心理学者となり
20:34
by becoming brilliant, intuitive psychologists.
他者の行動を推測できるようになりました
20:37
Treating people as machines
人々を機械のように扱うのは
20:41
may be scientifically and philosophically accurate,
科学的、生理学的には正しいかも知れません
20:43
but it's a cumbersome waste of time
しかし、それは人の次の行動を
20:47
if you want to guess what this person is going to do next.
推測するには非常に時間の無駄なのです
20:48
The economically useful way to model a person
快楽と苦痛、欲望と意図を持ち、罪と罰の対象になる
20:52
is to treat him as a purposeful, goal-seeking agent
目的を追い掛けるエージェントとして
20:55
with pleasures and pains, desires and intentions,
人々をモデル化する方が
20:58
guilt, blame-worthiness.
合理的な方法です
21:01
Personification and the imputing of intentional purpose
擬人化して意図を持ったものとして扱うことが
21:03
is such a brilliantly successful way to model humans,
人々をモデル化する非常に成功した方法だったので
21:08
it's hardly surprising the same modeling software
しばしば同じモデル化の手法を
21:11
often seizes control when we're trying to think about entities
バシル=フォルティが車にしたように
21:14
for which it's not appropriate, like Basil Fawlty with his car
あるいは何百万もの人々が信じている天の意思のように、
21:18
or like millions of deluded people with the universe as a whole. (Laughter)
不適切なものにまでその手法を適用してしまうのも不思議ではありません
21:21
If the universe is queerer than we can suppose,
宇宙が我々が想像できることを越えて奇妙だとして、
21:29
is it just because we've been naturally selected to suppose
それは更新世の時代にアフリカで生き抜くために
21:32
only what we needed to suppose in order to survive
必要なことだけを想像できるように
21:35
in the Pleistocene of Africa?
自然淘汰されたからでしょうか?
21:38
Or are our brains so versatile and expandable that we can
それとも、我々の脳は訓練によって進化の囲いを抜け出せるほど
21:41
train ourselves to break out of the box of our evolution?
柔軟で拡張可能なのでしょうか?
21:45
Or, finally, are there some things in the universe so queer
あるいは、最後に、どんなに神のように万能な存在も
21:50
that no philosophy of beings, however godlike, could dream them?
想像できないほどに我々の宇宙は奇妙なのでしょうか?
21:54
Thank you very much.
ご静聴ありがとうございました
22:01
Translator:Ryoichi KATO
Reviewer:Satoshi Tatsuhara

sponsored links

Richard Dawkins - Evolutionary biologist
Oxford professor Richard Dawkins has helped steer evolutionary science into the 21st century, and his concept of the "meme" contextualized the spread of ideas in the information age. In recent years, his devastating critique of religion has made him a leading figure in the New Atheism.

Why you should listen

As an evolutionary biologist, Richard Dawkins has broadened our understanding of the genetic origin of our species; as a popular author, he has helped lay readers understand complex scientific concepts. He's best-known for the ideas laid out in his landmark book The Selfish Gene and fleshed out in The Extended Phenotype: the rather radical notion that Darwinian selection happens not at the level of the individual, but at the level of our DNA. The implication: We evolved for only one purpose — to serve our genes.

Of perhaps equal importance is Dawkins' concept of the meme, which he defines as a self-replicating unit of culture -- an idea, a chain letter, a catchy tune, an urban legend -- which is passed person-to-person, its longevity based on its ability to lodge in the brain and inspire transmission to others. Introduced in The Selfish Gene in 1976, the concept of memes has itself proven highly contagious, inspiring countless accounts and explanations of idea propagation in the information age.

In recent years, Dawkins has become outspoken in his atheism, coining the word "bright" (as an alternate to atheist), and encouraging fellow non-believers to stand up and be identified. His controversial, confrontational 2002 TED talk was a seminal moment for the New Atheism, as was the publication of his 2006 book, The God Delusion, a bestselling critique of religion that championed atheism and promoted scientific principles over creationism and intelligent design.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.