English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED1998

David Gallo: Life in the deep oceans

デイビッド・ガロ「深海の生命について」

Filmed
Views 1,002,219

潜水艦から撮影したいきいきした映像を交えて、奇妙で回復力に富み、そして驚くほどに多様で密な生態系がひしめく、地球上で最も暗く、最も危険で有毒、それでいて最も美しい場所 -- 深海に眠る火山の尾根や谷をデイビッド・カロが案内します。

- Oceanographer
A pioneer in ocean exploration, David Gallo is an enthusiastic ambassador between the sea and those of us on dry land. Full bio

(Applause)
(拍手)
00:12
David Gallo: This is Bill Lange. I'm Dave Gallo.
デイビッド:彼はビル・ラング 私はデイブ・ガロです
00:13
And we're going to tell you some stories from the sea here in video.
ビデオをお見せして海について話をしようと思います
00:16
We've got some of the most incredible video of Titanic that's ever been seen,
我々はタイタニックの映像の中でも特に素晴らしい物を持っています
00:19
and we're not going to show you any of it.
そしてそれは今日お見せしません
00:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:27
The truth of the matter is that the Titanic --
タイタニックは実際に
00:30
even though it's breaking all sorts of box office records --
興行収入の記録は打ち立てましたが
00:32
it's not the most exciting story from the sea.
海洋における最もエキサイティングな話ではないんです
00:34
And the problem, I think, is that we take the ocean for granted.
海が当然のものと思われていることが問題です
00:38
When you think about it, the oceans are 75 percent of the planet.
考えてみれば海は地球の75%を占めており
00:41
Most of the planet is ocean water.
地球の大半は海です
00:43
The average depth is about two miles.
その深さは平均で約4kmですよ
00:45
Part of the problem, I think, is we stand at the beach,
私の思う問題の一部は
00:47
or we see images like this of the ocean,
海岸に立ったり 海を想像して
00:49
and you look out at this great big blue expanse, and it's shimmering
広大な青を臨むと海面はきらめきそして
00:52
and it's moving and there's waves and there's surf and there's tides,
動いています 波が寄せては返し 流れもあります
00:56
but you have no idea for what lies in there.
でもそこに何が眠っているかは知らないのです
00:59
And in the oceans, there are the longest mountain ranges on the planet.
海底には地球上最長の山脈があります
01:01
Most of the animals are in the oceans.
生命のほとんどは海中にいます
01:03
Most of the earthquakes and volcanoes are in the sea,
地震と火山も同様です
01:05
at the bottom of the sea.
つまり海底にあるんです
01:07
The biodiversity and the biodensity in the ocean is higher, in places,
海における多様性と生物密度は
01:09
than it is in the rainforests.
熱帯雨林のそれを上回ります
01:12
It's mostly unexplored, and yet there are beautiful sights like this
大部分が未開拓ですが我々を魅了し
01:14
that captivate us and make us become familiar with it.
親近感すら覚える美しい場所があります
01:16
But when you're standing at the beach, I want you to think
ですから浜辺はこの未知の世界の
01:19
that you're standing at the edge of a very unfamiliar world.
入り口であることを忘れないで下さい
01:21
We have to have a very special technology
我々がこの世界に入るには
01:23
to get into that unfamiliar world.
とても特別な技術を必要とします
01:25
We use the submarine Alvin and we use cameras,
我々は使用するのは潜水艦アルビンとカメラです
01:27
and the cameras are something that Bill Lange has developed with the help of Sony.
このカメラはビルがソニーと連携して開発したものです
01:30
Marcel Proust said, "The true voyage of discovery
マーセルが言いました「本当の探検とは
01:34
is not so much in seeking new landscapes as in having new eyes."
新たな風景の探索といより 新たな視点を持つということである」
01:36
People that have partnered with us have given us new eyes,
提携した人達も新たな視点を教えてくれます
01:41
not only on what exists --
既存の海底に眠る
01:43
the new landscapes at the bottom of the sea --
新たな風景だけでなく
01:45
but also how we think about life on the planet itself.
地球上の生命について考える方法です
01:47
Here's a jelly.
クラゲがいますね
01:49
It's one of my favorites, because it's got all sorts of working parts.
体全体が可動するので気に入っています
01:51
This turns out to be the longest creature in the oceans.
これは実は水中で最長の生物なんですよ
01:53
It gets up to about 150 feet long.
最長で約46mまで伸びます
01:55
But see all those different working things?
動きまわるのが見えますか?
01:58
I love that kind of stuff.
私はこの手のものが大好きです
02:00
It's got these fishing lures on the bottom. They're going up and down.
これには底にルアーがついていて 上下に動きます
02:02
It's got tentacles dangling, swirling around like that.
触手がこのようにゆらゆらと動きます
02:04
It's a colonial animal.
これは群体動物です
02:05
These are all individual animals
これらは全て別々の個体ですが
02:07
banding together to make this one creature.
集まり集合体を形成します
02:09
And it's got these jet thrusters up in front
前にはジェットエンジンがあって
02:11
that it'll use in a moment, and a little light.
小型のライトも装備しています
02:13
If you take all the big fish and schooling fish and all that,
大型の魚 群泳性の魚もろもろを捕獲して
02:17
put them on one side of the scale, put all the jelly-type of animals
測りを挟んで先ほどのクラゲと一緒に
02:20
on the other side, those guys win hands down.
並べれば こいつらの圧勝です
02:22
Most of the biomass in the ocean is made out of creatures like this.
海洋バイオマスの大半はこのような構造です
02:26
Here's the X-wing death jelly.
エックスウイングデスジェリーです
02:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:30
The bioluminescence -- they use the lights for attracting mates
発光は仲間を引き付ける際や獲物を誘惑する時―
02:34
and attracting prey and communicating.
意思疎通に利用されます
02:37
We couldn't begin to show you our archival stuff from the jellies.
クラゲのアーカイブをまずお見せすることは出来ませんでした
02:39
They come in all different sizes and shapes.
大きさ 形が全て異なっているからです
02:43
Bill Lange: We tend to forget about the fact that the ocean is miles deep
ビル:海が平均して何万kmもの深さがあることと我々が知っている
02:45
on average, and that we're real familiar with the animals
動物というのは海面から約―
02:49
that are in the first 200 or 300 feet, but we're not familiar
60-90mに生息するものだけで これ以降の
02:52
with what exists from there all the way down to the bottom.
深海の生物は未知であることを我々は忘れがちです
02:56
And these are the types of animals
そしてこういった生物たちは
02:59
that live in that three-dimensional space,
まだ未開拓の微小重力環境に
03:01
that micro-gravity environment that we really haven't explored.
暮らしている種族なのです
03:03
You hear about giant squid and things like that,
巨大イカの話は聞いたことがあるでしょうが
03:06
but some of these animals get up to be approximately 140, 160 feet long.
これらの一部は最大で約45mにもなります
03:09
They're very little understood.
彼らについての情報は殆どありません
03:13
DG: This is one of them, another one of our favorites, because it's a little octopod.
デイビッド:こちらもお気に入りです 小型のタコ目の一種です
03:15
You can actually see through his head.
実際に頭を見透かすことが出来ます
03:18
And here he is, flapping with his ears and very gracefully going up.
耳で水かきをして非常に優雅に泳ぐのです
03:20
We see those at all depths and even at the greatest depths.
最深部を含む あらゆる深度で見ることが出来ます
03:22
They go from a couple of inches to a couple of feet.
数cmのものから数mになるものもいます
03:25
They come right up to the submarine --
彼らはすぐに潜水艦に群がり -
03:27
they'll put their eyes right up to the window and peek inside the sub.
窓に目を押し付けて内を覗き見ます
03:29
This is really a world within a world,
これは実際に存在する世界です
03:31
and we're going to show you two.
他にあと2つお見せします
03:33
In this case, we're passing down through the mid-ocean and we see creatures like this.
海の真ん中を横切ると このような生き物を見ることが出来ます
03:35
This is kind of like an undersea rooster.
これは海底の乱暴者のようなものです
03:38
This guy, that looks incredibly formal, in a way.
こいつはある意味かなり畏まって見えます
03:40
And then one of my favorites. What a face!
こちらもお気に入りです なんて顔でしょう!
03:43
This is basically scientific data that you're looking at.
これが今眺めている科学的なデータです
03:47
It's footage that we've collected for scientific purposes.
科学的な目的のため採取した映像です
03:50
And that's one of the things that Bill's been doing,
これがビルの行ってきた作業の一つが
03:52
is providing scientists with this first view of animals like this,
このような動物の未知の分布状況を
03:54
in the world where they belong.
科学者に提供することです
03:56
They don't catch them in a net.
網で捕まえているわけではありません
03:58
They're actually looking at them down in that world.
実際に深海へ赴き撮影をしています
04:00
We're going to take a joystick,
操縦桿を握って 地上のコンピュータを
04:02
sit in front of our computer, on the Earth,
前に座りジョイスティックを
04:04
and press the joystick forward, and fly around the planet.
前に押して地球を飛び回ります
04:06
We're going to look at the mid-ocean ridge,
海中の尾根を探しに行きます
04:08
a 40,000-mile long mountain range.
約64000kmの長い山脈です
04:10
The average depth at the top of it is about a mile and a half.
山頂までの深さはだいたい800mです
04:12
And we're over the Atlantic -- that's the ridge right there --
ここは大西洋上です - あれが尾根です -
04:14
but we're going to go across the Caribbean, Central America,
カリブ海つまり中央アメリカを横断し
04:16
and end up against the Pacific, nine degrees north.
ここは太平洋 9度北上しました
04:19
We make maps of these mountain ranges with sound, with sonar,
音やソナーを用い これら山の地図を作成します
04:22
and this is one of those mountain ranges.
これは山脈の一つです
04:25
We're coming around a cliff here on the right.
右側に崖が近づいてきました
04:27
The height of these mountains on either side of this valley
この谷の両側 山の高さは
04:29
is greater than the Alps in most cases.
ほとんどの地点でアルプスのそれをしのぎます
04:31
And there's tens of thousands of those mountains out there that haven't been mapped yet.
まだ地図に記されていない山が何万と眠っています
04:33
This is a volcanic ridge.
これは火山の尾根です
04:36
We're getting down further and further in scale.
どんどん潜っていくと
04:38
And eventually, we can come up with something like this.
最終的にこんな所にたどり着きます
04:40
This is an icon of our robot, Jason, it's called.
我々のマスコットで ジェイソンと呼んでいます
04:42
And you can sit in a room like this,
このように座って ジョイスティックと
04:45
with a joystick and a headset, and drive a robot like that
ヘッドセットを用いてロボットを操作して
04:47
around the bottom of the ocean in real time.
実際に海底へ行くことが出来ます
04:50
One of the things we're trying to do at Woods Hole with our partners
ウッズホールとの共同目標の一つは
04:52
is to bring this virtual world --
この仮想世界 つまり
04:55
this world, this unexplored region -- back to the laboratory.
未だ未開拓の世界を 研究所へ持ち帰ることです
04:57
Because we see it in bits and pieces right now.
今見ているのは単なるデータに過ぎませんから
05:00
We see it either as sound, or we see it as video,
音として捉えたり 映像や写真に収めたり
05:02
or we see it as photographs, or we see it as chemical sensors,
科学センサーで感知していますが
05:05
but we never have yet put it all together into one interesting picture.
面白みのある全体像としてまとめたことは未だにないのです
05:07
Here's where Bill's cameras really do shine.
ここはビルのカメラの見せどころです
05:11
This is what's called a hydrothermal vent.
これは熱水噴出孔と呼ばれるものです
05:13
And what you're seeing here is a cloud of densely packed,
そして 今ご覧いただいているのは海底火山の軸から
05:15
hydrogen-sulfide-rich water
湧き出す濃密に圧縮された
05:18
coming out of a volcanic axis on the sea floor.
硫化水素を含む水の雲です
05:20
Gets up to 600, 700 degrees F, somewhere in that range.
華氏で600-700度の範囲まで上昇します
05:24
So that's all water under the sea --
これが海中に眠る世界
05:27
a mile and a half, two miles, three miles down.
海底数キロメートルの光景です
05:29
And we knew it was volcanic back in the '60s, '70s.
60、70年代には火山だったと確認されています
05:31
And then we had some hint that these things existed
この噴煙が地球の軸に沿って存在するという
05:34
all along the axis of it, because if you've got volcanism,
根拠があります 火山活動が起これば
05:37
water's going to get down from the sea into cracks in the sea floor,
海の水は割れ目へと流れ込みます そこで
05:39
come in contact with magma, and come shooting out hot.
マグマに触れ 熱せられた状態で噴出します
05:43
We weren't really aware that it would be so rich with sulfides, hydrogen sulfides.
水素酸化物をこんなに多く含んでいるとは知りませんでした
05:46
We didn't have any idea about these things, which we call chimneys.
こんなものは見たことがなく 煙突と呼んでいます
05:51
This is one of these hydrothermal vents.
これは熱水噴出孔の一種です
05:54
Six hundred degree F water coming out of the Earth.
地球から華氏600度の水が吹き出しています
05:56
On either side of us are mountain ranges that are higher than the Alps,
両側にある山はアルプスよりも高く この風景は
05:59
so the setting here is very dramatic.
とてもドラマチックです
06:03
BL: The white material is a type of bacteria
ビル: この白い物体はバクテリアの一種で
06:05
that thrives at 180 degrees C.
摂氏180度の所で暮らしています
06:07
DG: I think that's one of the greatest stories right now
デイブ:これは海底に見る素晴らしい
06:10
that we're seeing from the bottom of the sea,
物語の一つだと思っています
06:12
is that the first thing we see coming out of the sea floor
火山の噴火後に海底からまず
06:14
after a volcanic eruption is bacteria.
出てくるのはバクテリアなのです
06:16
And we started to wonder for a long time,
そこから長い間考えていました
06:18
how did it all get down there?
どうやって海底ができたのだろうか?
06:20
What we find out now is that it's probably coming from inside the Earth.
多分地球の内側からできたのだろうと考えています
06:22
Not only is it coming out of the Earth --
地球の内側から出来ただけではなく
06:25
so, biogenesis made from volcanic activity --
つまり火山活動による生物発生説
06:27
but that bacteria supports these colonies of life.
バクテリアも生物の生息地を支えているのでしょう
06:29
The pressure here is 4,000 pounds per square inch.
ここの水圧は1インチあたり約1800kgです
06:32
A mile and a half from the surface to two miles to three miles --
海面下数kmのここに
06:36
no sun has ever gotten down here.
太陽光が届くことはありません
06:38
All the energy to support these life forms
ここでの命を支えるエネルギーは全て
06:41
is coming from inside the Earth -- so, chemosynthesis.
地球内部から発生しています つまり化学合成です
06:43
And you can see how dense the population is.
生き物が沢山いることがわかりますね
06:46
These are called tube worms.
これはチューブワームと呼ばれています
06:48
BL: These worms have no digestive system. They have no mouth.
ビル: このワームには消化器官も口もありません
06:50
But they have two types of gill structures.
しかし二種類のえらを持っています
06:53
One for extracting oxygen out of the deep-sea water,
一つは深海水から酸素を取り込むもので
06:55
another one which houses this chemosynthetic bacteria,
もう一方は化学合成細菌を収容するものです
06:58
which takes the hydrothermal fluid --
このバクテリアは熱水流体を取り込むのです
07:02
that hot water that you saw coming out of the bottom --
先ほどお見せした 海底から沸き出るお湯ですが
07:05
and converts that into simple sugars that the tube worm can digest.
そしてこれをワームの消化できる純粋な糖分へと変えるのです
07:08
DG: You can see, here's a crab that lives down there.
デイビッド:カニが暮らしているのが見えますね
07:13
He's managed to grab a tip of these worms.
彼はワームをつかむことが出来ます
07:15
Now, they normally retract as soon as a crab touches them.
さて通常はカニが触れると反応します
07:17
Oh! Good going.
おっ! 動きましたね
07:19
So, as soon as a crab touches them,
カニが触れた瞬間に
07:21
they retract down into their shells, just like your fingernails.
ピクッと殻の中へ引っ込みます
07:23
There's a whole story being played out here
今お見せしているのは最近
07:25
that we're just now beginning to have some idea of
解明が始まったばかりのものばかりです
07:27
because of this new camera technology.
全て最新カメラ技術のおかげです
07:29
BL: These worms live in a real temperature extreme.
ビル:このワームは激動の気温変動の中暮らしています
07:31
Their foot is at about 200 degrees C
足元は摂氏約200度程ですが
07:34
and their head is out at three degrees C,
頭部の付近は摂氏3度程です
07:38
so it's like having your hand in boiling water and your foot in freezing water.
これは手を沸騰水に 足を凍りつく水に浸しているような感じです
07:41
That's how they like to live.
こういう生き方が好みなんです
07:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:47
DG: This is a female of this kind of worm.
デイビッド:これはワームのメスです
07:49
And here's a male.
こちらはオスです
07:51
You watch. It doesn't take long before two guys here --
見てください 長くはかかりませんよ --
07:53
this one and one that will show up over here -- start to fight.
こいつとあちらのやつが -- 喧嘩を始めます
07:56
Everything you see is played out in the pitch black of the deep sea.
これは全て真っ暗闇の深海での出来事です
07:59
There are never any lights there, except the lights that we bring.
光は我々の持ち込んだものしか届きません
08:02
Here they go.
始まりました
08:05
On one of the last dive series,
最近のあるダイビング中に
08:07
we counted 200 species in these areas --
この周辺で200の種を見ましたが
08:09
198 were new, new species.
そのうち198は新種でした
08:11
BL: One of the big problems is that for the biologists
ビル:問題の一つは生物学者がここらで
08:14
working at these sites, it's rather difficult to collect these animals.
作業をしており 回収作業が難しいことです
08:16
And they disintegrate on the way up,
さらに帰還中に分解してしまうので
08:19
so the imagery is critical for the science.
科学には実物が必要ですよね
08:21
DG: Two octopods at about two miles depth.
デイビッド:約4kmの所にタコが2体います
08:24
This pressure thing really amazes me --
水圧も驚くべきものです
08:26
that these animals can exist there at a depth
彼らはタイタニックをペプシの空き缶のように
08:28
with pressure enough to crush the Titanic like an empty Pepsi can.
潰してしまうほどの圧力下で暮らしているのです
08:31
What we saw up till now was from the Pacific.
太平洋からここまで登ってきました
08:34
This is from the Atlantic. Even greater depth.
大西洋です 更に深くに行きましょう
08:36
You can see this shrimp is harassing this poor little guy here,
このエビは小さいやつにちょっかいを出していますね
08:38
and he'll bat it away with his claw. Whack!
爪で追い払っちゃうよ バーン!
08:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:43
And the same thing's going on over here.
ここでも同じことが起きています
08:44
What they're getting at is that -- on the back of this crab --
こいつらでカニの背中で食料を採取しています
08:46
the foodstuff here is this very strange bacteria
とても変わったバクテリアで
08:49
that lives on the backs of all these animals.
あらゆる動物の背中に生息します
08:51
And what these shrimp are trying to do
そして このエビはこの動物の背中から
08:53
is actually harvest the bacteria from the backs of these animals.
バクテリアを栽培しようとしているのです
08:55
And the crabs don't like it at all.
カニはこれが大嫌いなんです
08:58
These long filaments that you see on the back of the crab
カニの背部に見えるこの長いフィラメントは
09:00
are actually created by the product of that bacteria.
あのバクテリアの生成物によって作られたものです
09:02
So, the bacteria grows hair on the crab.
つまりバクテリアがカニの毛を育てるのです
09:06
On the back, you see this again.
背中をもう一度見てください
09:08
The red dot is the laser light of the submarine Alvin
赤い点は噴気孔からの距離特定用に
09:10
to give us an idea about how far away we are from the vents.
潜水艦アルビンが発しているレーザーライトです
09:12
Those are all shrimp.
これは全てエビです
09:15
You see the hot water over here, here and here, coming out.
熱湯がぼこぼこ吹き出しているのが分かります
09:17
They're clinging to a rock face
彼らは岩肌にくっついていますが 実は
09:19
and actually scraping bacteria off that rock face.
岩肌からバクテリアをそぎ落としているのです
09:22
Here's a tiny, little vent that's come out of the side of that pillar.
支柱の脇に小さな噴出孔があります
09:25
Those pillars get up to several stories.
この支柱の長さは何メートルもあります
09:30
So here, you've got this valley with this incredible alien landscape
この谷は 柱に噴き出る熱湯 火山活動―
09:32
of pillars and hot springs and volcanic eruptions and earthquakes,
地震といった異様な光景に溢れており
09:35
inhabited by these very strange animals
地球内部で生成される化学エネルギーを
09:39
that live only on chemical energy coming out of the ground.
糧に生きる奇妙な生物が暮らしているのです
09:41
They don't need the sun at all.
彼らに太陽は不要なのです
09:43
BL: You see this white V-shaped mark on the back of the shrimp?
ビル:エビの背中に白いV字型の印が見えますか?
09:45
It's actually a light-sensing organ.
実はこれは光センサー器官です
09:48
It's how they find the hydrothermal vents.
こうして熱水噴出孔を探し当てます
09:50
The vents are emitting a black body radiation -- an IR signature --
ここからは黒体放射 -- 赤外線の一種 -- が出ていいるため
09:52
and so they're able to find these vents at considerable distances.
彼らはかなりの距離からでも噴出孔を見つけることができるのです
09:56
DG: All this stuff is happening along that 40,000-mile long mountain range
デイビッド:お見せしたのは約64000kmに渡る山脈で
10:00
that we're calling the ribbon of life, because just even today,
命のリボンと呼んでいます 今私達が話を
10:03
as we speak, there's life being generated there from volcanic activity.
している間も 火山活動により命が誕生しているからです
10:06
This is the first time we've ever tried this any place.
これは我々の初の試みなのです
10:10
We're going to try to show you high definition from the Pacific.
太平洋での高解像映像をお見せします
10:12
We're moving up one of these pillars.
柱を一本持ち帰っているところです
10:15
This one's several stories tall.
この柱は数メートルの長さがあります
10:17
In it, you'll see that it's a habitat for a lot of different animals.
内部に様々な動物が生息していることがわかりますね
10:19
There's a funny kind of hot plate here, with vent water coming out of it.
変てこなホットプレートから熱湯が漏れています
10:23
So all of these are individual homes for worms.
これらは全てワームの住処なのです
10:26
Now here's a closer view of that community.
さらに接写した映像をお見せします
10:29
Here's crabs here, worms here.
こちらにカニとワームがいます
10:31
There are smaller animals crawling around.
小さいのが這い回ってますね
10:33
Here's pagoda structures.
塔みたな構造をしています
10:35
I think this is the neatest-looking thing.
見た目上はこれが一番かと思います
10:37
I just can't get over this --
ここは見逃せませんよ
10:39
that you've got these little chimneys sitting here smoking away.
小さな煙突が煙を履いています
10:41
This stuff is toxic as hell, by the way.
これはおぞましいほど有毒なんです
10:43
You could never get a permit to dump this in the ocean,
これを海に廃棄する許可は降りないでしょうね
10:45
and it's coming out all from it.
まぁ全て海から出ているんですが
10:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:49
It's unbelievable. It's basically sulfuric acid,
信じがたいですが これは硫酸なんです
10:54
and it's being just dumped out, at incredible rates.
途方も無い量が海水に流入してます ここは
10:56
And animals are thriving -- and we probably came from here.
動物の住処で 多分人類誕生の場所です
10:59
That's probably where we evolved from.
多分ここから進化してきたのでしょう
11:01
BL: This bacteria that we've been talking about
ビル:さっき話しをしたこのバクテリアは
11:03
turns out to be the most simplest form of life found.
知りうる限り最も単純な生命体なんです
11:05
There are a number of groups that are proposing
これら噴出孔から生物が生まれたと
11:10
that life evolved at these vent sites.
主張する団体はいくらもあります
11:12
Although the vent sites are short-lived --
噴出孔自体は短命なんですけどね
11:14
an individual site may last only 10 years or so --
一箇所は10年程度しか存続しません
11:16
as an ecosystem they've been stable for millions -- well, billions -- of years.
ここの生態系は何百万 -- いや何十億 -- 年も続いていますけどね
11:20
DG: It works too well. You see there're some fish inside here as well.
デイビッド:上手くいき過ぎです ここには魚がいます
11:25
There's a fish sitting here.
魚が一匹座っています
11:28
Here's a crab with his claw right at the end of that tube worm,
チューブワームに爪を向けるカニがいます
11:30
waiting for that worm to stick his head out.
頭をくっつけてくるのを待っているんです
11:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:35
BL: The biologists right now cannot explain
ビル:今日の生物学者達はこれらの
11:37
why these animals are so active.
生命体の活力を説明するに至っていません
11:39
The worms are growing inches per week!
このワームは週に数cmも伸びるんですよ!
11:41
DG: I already said that this site,
デイビッド:先ほど言いましたが
11:43
from a human perspective, is toxic as hell.
ここは人間には地獄同然です
11:45
Not only that, but on top -- the lifeblood --
それだけでなく -- 活力である --
11:47
that plumbing system turns off every year or so.
噴出孔もだんだんと枯れていくので
11:50
Their plumbing system turns off, so the sites have to move.
別の噴出孔に移り住まなくてはいけません
11:53
And then there's earthquakes,
さらには地震も起こりますし
11:55
and then volcanic eruptions, on the order of one every five years,
5年毎くらいに起こる火山の噴火で
11:57
that completely wipes the area out.
何もかも流されてしまいます
12:00
Despite that, these animals grow back in about a year's time.
にも関わらず1年もすれば命が戻って来ます
12:02
You're talking about biodensities and biodiversity, again,
これは息を吹き返したばかりの熱帯雨林の
12:05
higher than the rainforest that just springs back to life.
多様性 密度を凌いでいるんです
12:09
Is it sensitive? Yes.
感受性は?高いです
12:12
Is it fragile? No, it's not really very fragile.
脆いの?いえ そんなに脆くはありません
12:14
I'll end up with saying one thing.
最後に一つだけ言っておきます
12:16
There's a story in the sea, in the waters of the sea,
海 海水 堆積物 海底の岩の中には
12:18
in the sediments and the rocks of the sea floor.
物語が眠っています
12:20
It's an incredible story.
驚愕の物語です
12:22
What we see when we look back in time,
堆積物や岩を観察し時間を
12:24
in those sediments and rocks, is a record of Earth history.
さかのぼると見えるものは地球の歴史なのです
12:26
Everything on this planet -- everything -- works by cycles and rhythms.
地球上のありとあらゆるものは周期とリズムに従って働いています
12:29
The continents move apart. They come back together.
大陸は分断し 再びめぐり合う
12:33
Oceans come and go. Mountains come and go. Glaciers come and go.
海も山も氷山もよせてはかえす
12:35
El Nino comes and goes. It's not a disaster, it's rhythmic.
エルニーニョ現象の発生は突発的でなく周期的
12:38
What we're learning now, it's almost like a symphony.
我々の学んでいることは協奏曲みたいなものです
12:40
It's just like music -- it really is just like music.
音楽みたい -- というか音楽そのものです
12:43
And what we're learning now is that
そして50億年分の協奏曲を
12:45
you can't listen to a five-billion-year long symphony, get to today and say,
聞かずに今日に至り「やめろ!明日の調べは今日のものと
12:47
"Stop! We want tomorrow's note to be the same as it was today."
一緒がいいんだ」とは言えないのです
12:51
It's absurd. It's just absurd.
馬鹿げてます 本当に
12:54
So, what we've got to learn now is to find out where this planet's going
つまり この全く異なるスケールで地球がどこへ向かっているのか
12:56
at all these different scales and work with it.
そしてどう付き合っていくのか知る必要があるのです
12:59
Learn to manage it.
指揮するために知りましょう
13:01
The concept of preservation is futile.
保存という概念は虚しいものです
13:03
Conservation's tougher, but we can probably get there.
保全は難しいですが おそらく達成できるでしょう
13:05
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
13:07
Thank you.
ありがとう
13:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:11
Translated by Takahiro Shimpo
Reviewed by Hidetoshi Yamauchi

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

David Gallo - Oceanographer
A pioneer in ocean exploration, David Gallo is an enthusiastic ambassador between the sea and those of us on dry land.

Why you should listen

David Gallo works to push the bounds of oceanic discovery. Active in undersea exploration (sometimes in partnership with legendary Titanic-hunter Robert Ballard), he was one of the first oceanographers to use a combination of manned submersibles and robots to map the ocean world with unprecedented clarity and detail. He was a co-expedition leader during an exploration of the RMS Titanic and the German battleship Bismarck, using Russian Mir subs.

On behalf of the Woods Hole labs, he appears around the country speaking on ocean and water issues. Most recently he co-led an expedition to create the first detailed and comprehensive map of the RMS Titanic and he co-led the successful international effort to locate the wreck site of Air France flight 447. He is involved in planning an international Antarctic expedition to locate and document the wreckage of Ernest Shackleton’s ship, HMS Endurance.

More profile about the speaker
David Gallo | Speaker | TED.com