English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2005

James Watson: How we discovered DNA

ジェームズ・ワトソンが語る「DNA構造解明にいたるまで」

Filmed
Views 1,539,211

TED2005のオープニングを飾ってノーベル賞受賞者のジェームズ・ワトソンが、研究仲間のフランシス・クリックと共に歩んだDNA構造の解明までの物語についておもしろおかしく、ざっくばらんに話します。

- Biologist, Nobel laureate
Nobel laureate James Watson took part in one of the most important scientific breakthroughs of the 20th century: the discovery of the structure of DNA. More than 50 years later, he continues to investigate biology's deepest secrets. Full bio

Well, I thought there would be a podium, so I'm a bit scared.
演壇があるものだと思っていたので、ちょっと落ち着きませんね
00:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:28
Chris asked me to tell again how we found the structure of DNA.
DNAの構造を解明した話をまたしてくれとクリスに頼まれました
00:31
And since, you know, I follow his orders, I'll do it.
彼の仰せですから、やることにしましょう
00:34
But it slightly bores me.
私にとってはちょっと退屈な話なのですがね
00:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:39
And, you know, I wrote a book. So I'll say something --
まあ本を書いたくらいなんだから、何か言うことがあるでしょ…
00:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:46
-- I'll say a little about, you know, how the discovery was made,
どう解明したのか、それがなぜ私とフランシスだったのか
00:48
and why Francis and I found it.
ひとつお話しすることにしましょう
00:51
And then, I hope maybe I have at least five minutes to say
そして、最後に時間が余ったら、最低5分くらい
00:53
what makes me tick now.
今私が夢中なことについてお話しできるといいですね
00:57
In back of me is a picture of me when I was 17.
後ろに出ているのは私が17のときの写真です
01:01
I was at the University of Chicago, in my third year,
私はシカゴ大学の3年生でした
01:06
and I was in my third year because the University of Chicago
なぜ3年だったかというと、シカゴ大学は中高等学校を2年やっただけで
01:09
let you in after two years of high school.
入学させてくれたのです
01:15
So you -- it was fun to get away from high school -- (Laughter) --
中高等学校から解放されるのはありがたかったね
01:17
because I was very small, and I was no good in sports,
なぜって私は本当にちびで、スポーツなんかには全く
01:23
or anything like that.
能がなかったから
01:26
But I should say that my background -- my father was, you know,
私の育ちについてちょっとお話しましょう。父は
01:27
raised to be an Episcopalian and Republican,
聖公会と共和党の家系に育ちました
01:33
but after one year of college, he became an atheist and a Democrat.
しかし大学入学一年後には無神論と民主党支持者になっていました
01:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:40
And my mother was Irish Catholic,
母はアイルランド系カトリックでした
01:43
and -- but she didn't take religion too seriously.
しかしそんなに信心深くはありませんでした
01:45
And by the age of 11, I was no longer going to Sunday Mass,
そんな理由で11歳になる頃にはもう日曜教会に行かずに
01:50
and going on birdwatching walks with my father.
私は父とバードウォッチングに出かけるようになったのです
01:54
So early on, I heard of Charles Darwin.
そしてまだ幼い頃にチャールズ ダーウィンを知りました
01:58
I guess, you know, he was the big hero.
彼は大ヒーローだったんです
02:02
And, you know, you understand life as it now exists through evolution.
今ある生物が進化の結果であることを明らかにしたものですから
02:05
And at the University of Chicago I was a zoology major,
私はシカゴ大学で動物学を専攻していました
02:11
and thought I would end up, you know, if I was bright enough,
そして、もし十分優秀だったら、
02:15
maybe getting a Ph.D. from Cornell in ornithology.
コーネル大学で鳥類学の博士号を取得できるかな、などと考えていました
02:18
Then, in the Chicago paper, there was a review of a book
そしたらシカゴの新聞に載っていたシュレーディンガーというすばらしい物理学者による
02:23
called "What is Life?" by the great physicist, Schrodinger.
「生命とは何か」という本の書評を見かけました
02:29
And that, of course, had been a question I wanted to know.
それはまさに私が知りたいと思っていた疑問でした
02:33
You know, Darwin explained life after it got started,
ダーウィンは生命が始まった後についてを明らかにしましたが、
02:36
but what was the essence of life?
生命の本質は何なんでしょう?
02:39
And Schrodinger said the essence was information
シュレーディンガーによるとそれは染色体に記された情報で、
02:41
present in our chromosomes, and it had to be present
分子として存在するということでした
02:45
on a molecule. I'd never really thought of molecules before.
私はそれまで分子について真剣に考えたことがありませんでした
02:49
You know chromosomes, but this was a molecule,
染色体は分かるけれど、これは分子についての話でした
02:55
and somehow all the information was probably present
そして全ての情報は何らかのデジタル形式で
02:59
in some digital form. And there was the big question
存在しているのです。そしてもう一つ大きな疑問は、その情報はどうやって
03:02
of, how did you copy the information?
複製されるのかということです
03:06
So that was the book. And so, from that moment on,
そんな本でした。その時点から
03:08
I wanted to be a geneticist --
私は遺伝学者になりたいと思うようになりました
03:13
understand the gene and, through that, understand life.
遺伝子を通して生命を理解したいと
03:18
So I had, you know, a hero at a distance.
そんなわけで私には遠いところにヒーローができたのです
03:20
It wasn't a baseball player; it was Linus Pauling.
野球選手ではなく、ライナス ポーリングでした
03:25
And so I applied to Caltech and they turned me down.
だから私はカルテク(カリフォルニア工科大学)を受験しましたが、けられました
03:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:33
So I went to Indiana,
それでインディアナ大に行きました
03:35
which was actually as good as Caltech in genetics,
実はカルテクと同じくらい遺伝学に強く、
03:36
and besides, they had a really good basketball team. (Laughter)
その上インディアナにはとても強いバスケット ボール部があったのです
03:39
So I had a really quite happy life at Indiana.
だからインディアナではかなり幸せな学生時代をすごしました
03:43
And it was at Indiana I got the impression
またこの頃に、遺伝子の正体はDNAじゃないかと
03:46
that, you know, the gene was likely to be DNA.
思うようになりました
03:49
And so when I got my Ph.D., I should go and search for DNA.
そして博士号を取得したらDNAを追求するべきだと考えだしました
03:51
So I first went to Copenhagen because I thought, well,
そのためまずコペンハーゲンに渡りました。なぜって、まあ生化学者になるべきかなと
03:55
maybe I could become a biochemist,
思ったからです
04:01
but I discovered biochemistry was very boring.
でも生化学は全くおもしろくないということに気付きました
04:02
It wasn't going anywhere toward, you know, saying what the gene was;
遺伝子の正体を解明するという方向には全然進んでいなかったのです
04:05
it was just nuclear science. And oh, that's the book, little book.
もっぱら核酸の化学でした。ああ、この本が「生命とは何か」です
04:09
You can read it in about two hours.
2時間くらいで読めるね
04:13
And -- but then I went to a meeting in Italy.
そんなときイタリアで開かれた会議に出席しました
04:15
And there was an unexpected speaker who wasn't on the program,
そこには予想外の、プログラムに載っていない講演者がいました
04:19
and he talked about DNA.
そして彼はDNAについて話したのです
04:24
And this was Maurice Wilkins. He was trained as a physicist,
モーリス ウィルキンスです。彼は元々物理学者でした
04:26
and after the war he wanted to do biophysics, and he picked DNA
戦後は生物物理学を研究したいと考え、DNAを選んだのです
04:29
because DNA had been determined at the Rockefeller Institute
なぜならロックフェラー研究所でDNAが
04:33
to possibly be the genetic molecules on the chromosomes.
染色体にある遺伝子の分子だろうということが示されたからです
04:36
Most people believed it was proteins.
タンパク質だと思われていたのですが
04:40
But Wilkins, you know, thought DNA was the best bet,
ウィルキンスは DNA の可能性が一番高いと考え
04:41
and he showed this x-ray photograph.
このX線写真を披露したのです
04:45
Sort of crystalline. So DNA had a structure,
結晶のように見えます。DNAにそういう構造があるということです
04:49
even though it owed it to probably different molecules
いろいろな分子がそれぞれ異なる指令を
04:53
carrying different sets of instructions.
保持しているのでしょうけれど
04:56
So there was something universal about the DNA molecule.
つまりDNA分子には万能な一面があったのです
04:58
So I wanted to work with him, but he didn't want a former birdwatcher,
私は彼と研究がしたかったのですが、彼は元バードウォッチャーなんかに用はなかったものですから
05:00
and I ended up in Cambridge, England.
私は英国、ケンブリッジに行くことにしました
05:05
So I went to Cambridge,
ケンブリッジに行ったのは、
05:06
because it was really the best place in the world then
当時X線回折で最先端だったからです
05:08
for x-ray crystallography. And x-ray crystallography is now a subject
今日X線回折といえば
05:11
in, you know, chemistry departments.
化学科の領域ですよね
05:15
I mean, in those days it was the domain of the physicists.
でもそのころは物理学者の領域でした
05:17
So the best place for x-ray crystallography
だからX線回折を勉強するのに最高な場所は
05:20
was at the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge.
ケンブリッジのキャベンディッシュ研究所でした
05:24
And there I met Francis Crick.
そしてそこでフランシス クリックに出会ったのです
05:27
I went there without knowing him. He was 35. I was 23.
それ以前には彼を知りませんでした。彼は35、私は23でした
05:33
And within a day, we had decided that
そして1日たらずで私達は
05:36
maybe we could take a shortcut to finding the structure of DNA.
DNAの構造解明への近道があるかもしれないという結論に至りました
05:41
Not solve it like, you know, in rigorous fashion, but build a model,
厳密な方法で明らかにするのではなく、模型を作ってはどうかと
05:46
an electro-model, using some coordinates of, you know,
X線写真を元に長さなどを求めて
05:52
length, all that sort of stuff from x-ray photographs.
分子模型を作ったらどうかと考えました
05:56
But just ask what the molecule -- how should it fold up?
ただ分子がどう畳み込まれているのかさえ解明すればいいのです
05:59
And the reason for doing so, at the center of this photograph,
そうしようと思ったきっかけは、この写真の真ん中に写っている
06:02
is Linus Pauling. About six months before, he proposed
ライナス ポーリングでした。6ヶ月ほど前に彼は
06:06
the alpha helical structure for proteins. And in doing so,
タンパク質のαヘリックス構造を提案して、そのとき
06:09
he banished the man out on the right,
左の男を蹴落としたのです
06:13
Sir Lawrence Bragg, who was the Cavendish professor.
キャベンディッシュの教授だったローレンス ブラッグ卿
06:15
This is a photograph several years later,
これは数年後の彼の写真です
06:18
when Bragg had cause to smile.
そのころのブラッグには笑う理由がありました
06:20
He certainly wasn't smiling when I got there,
でも私が到着したときは笑ってはいませんでしたよ
06:22
because he was somewhat humiliated by Pauling getting the alpha helix,
αヘリックス構造をポーリングに解明されたことで、いくらか恥をかいたものですから
06:24
and the Cambridge people failing because they weren't chemists.
ケンブリッジの人達は化学者でなかったため失敗したのです
06:28
And certainly, neither Crick or I were chemists,
もちろんクリックと私も化学者ではありませんでしたけど
06:32
so we tried to build a model. And he knew, Francis knew Wilkins.
頑張って模型を作りました。フランシスはウィルキンスを知っていて
06:37
So Wilkins said he thought it was the helix.
彼はヘリックス構造だと思うと言ったのです
06:43
X-ray diagram, he thought was comparable with the helix.
X線図で見るとヘリックスに似ていると
06:45
So we built a three-stranded model.
私達は三本鎖型の模型を作りました
06:48
The people from London came up.
ロンドンの人達が見に来ました
06:50
Wilkins and this collaborator, or possible collaborator,
ウィルキンスと彼の研究仲間の、正確に言うと後の研究仲間の、
06:52
Rosalind Franklin, came up and sort of laughed at our model.
ロザリンド フランクリンが来て、私たちの模型を見ては笑ったのです
06:57
They said it was lousy, and it was.
ひどい模型だと。その通りだったのですが
07:00
So we were told to build no more models; we were incompetent.
だから模型なんてもうやめろと言われました。私達は無能だと
07:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:07
And so we didn't build any models,
だからもう模型は作りませんでした
07:11
and Francis sort of continued to work on proteins.
フランシスはタンパク質についての研究を続けました
07:13
And basically, I did nothing. And -- except read.
私は特に何もしませんでした。ただ読書をしていただけです
07:16
You know, basically, reading is a good thing; you get facts.
読書するのは基本的にいいことです。事実を学べます
07:22
And we kept telling the people in London
そしてライナス ポーリングはきっとDNAに取り組むぞと
07:25
that Linus Pauling's going to move on to DNA.
ロンドンの人達に訴え続けました
07:28
If DNA is that important, Linus will know it.
DNAが重要ならライナスは気付くはずです
07:30
He'll build a model, and then we're going to be scooped.
彼が模型を作れば、私たちは出し抜かれてしまう
07:32
And, in fact, he'd written the people in London:
彼はロンドンの人達に手紙を書いて
07:34
Could he see their x-ray photograph?
彼らのX線写真を見せてもらえないか、と尋ねていたのです
07:36
And they had the wisdom to say "no." So he didn't have it.
彼らが賢明にも断ったので、ライナスはX線写真を持っていませんでした
07:39
But there was ones in the literature.
ただ写真は文献に載っていたのですが
07:42
Actually, Linus didn't look at them that carefully.
実はライナスはあんまり詳しく見ていませんでした
07:44
But about, oh, 15 months after I got to Cambridge,
でも私がケンブリッジに来て15ヶ月たったとき
07:46
a rumor began to appear from Linus Pauling's son,
当時ケンブリッジにいたライナス ポーリングの息子が
07:52
who was in Cambridge, that his father was now working on DNA.
彼の父親がDNAの研究をしているという噂をはじめました
07:55
And so, one day Peter came in and he said he was Peter Pauling,
そしてある日ピーターがやって来て、自分はピーター ポーリングだと名乗り
07:59
and he gave me a copy of his father's manuscripts.
彼の父親の原稿をくれました
08:03
And boy, I was scared because I thought, you know, we may be scooped.
私は先を越されたかもと思って焦りました
08:05
I have nothing to do, no qualifications for anything.
何もしていないし、何も認めてもらえないんだと
08:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:14
And so there was the paper, and he proposed a three-stranded structure.
そしてその原稿で彼は三本鎖型を提案していました
08:16
And I read it, and it was just -- it was crap.
見てみたら、全くクズでしたね
08:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:24
So this was, you know, unexpected from the world's --
あの世界の…がこれ?
08:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:32
-- and so, it was held together by hydrogen bonds
リン酸基の間を水素結合で
08:34
between phosphate groups.
つないでありました
08:37
Well, if the peak pH that cells have is around seven,
もし細胞の最高pHが7くらいだとしたら、
08:39
those hydrogen bonds couldn't exist.
そんな水素結合が存在することは不可能です
08:43
We rushed over to the chemistry department and said,
大急ぎで化学科に行き
08:46
"Could Pauling be right?" And Alex Hust said, "No." So we were happy.
「ポーリングが正しい可能性はあるか?」と聞くと、ハストが「いや、ない」と言ったので、私達は喜びました
08:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:54
And, you know, we were still in the game, but we were frightened
私達はまだ負けたわけではありませんでしたが
08:56
that somebody at Caltech would tell Linus that he was wrong.
カルテクで誰かがライナスの間違いを彼に指摘するのではとびくびくしていました
08:59
And so Bragg said, "Build models."
ブラッグは「模型を作りなさい」と言いました
09:03
And a month after we got the Pauling manuscript --
そしてポーリングの原稿を受け取って1ヶ月後
09:05
I should say I took the manuscript to London, and showed the people.
私はロンドンにその原稿を持って行ってそこの人達に見せたのです
09:09
Well, I said, Linus was wrong and that we're still in the game
私は、ライナスは間違ってる、まだ私達にはチャンスがある
09:14
and that they should immediately start building models.
すぐ模型を作るべきだと言いました
09:17
But Wilkins said "no." Rosalind Franklin was leaving in about two months,
しかしウィルキンスは、いや、ロザリンド フランクリンが約2ヶ月で発つ予定だから
09:19
and after she left he would start building models.
彼女がいなくなってから模型に取りかかろう、と言いました
09:24
And so I came back with that news to Cambridge,
だから私はケンブリッジに戻ってその話を伝えたのですが
09:27
and Bragg said, "Build models."
ブラッグは「模型を作れ」と
09:31
Well, of course, I wanted to build models.
もちろん望むところです
09:32
And there's a picture of Rosalind. She really, you know,
そしてこれがロザリンドです
09:33
in one sense she was a chemist,
彼女はある意味では化学者で
09:39
but really she would have been trained --
でも本当のことをいうと
09:41
she didn't know any organic chemistry or quantum chemistry.
彼女は有機化学や量子化学について何も知らなかった
09:43
She was a crystallographer.
彼女は結晶学者だったのです
09:46
And I think part of the reason she didn't want to build models
そして彼女が模型を作りたがらなかったのは
09:47
was, she wasn't a chemist, whereas Pauling was a chemist.
彼女はポーリングのように化学者でなかったということに関係していたのでしょう
09:52
And so Crick and I, you know, started building models,
だからクリックと私は模型作りを始めました
09:55
and I'd learned a little chemistry, but not enough.
私が過去に得たわずかな化学の知識は不十分でした
10:00
Well, we got the answer on the 28th February '53.
さて、1953年2月28日に答えにたどり着きました
10:03
And it was because of a rule, which, to me, is a very good rule:
あるルールのおかげでした。それは私に言わせるととってもいいルールで
10:07
Never be the brightest person in a room, and we weren't.
「その場で一番できる人間にはならないこと」というものです
10:11
We weren't the best chemists in the room.
私達は確かにその中で一番賢い化学者ではありませんでした
10:17
I went in and showed them a pairing I'd done,
組み上げた模型を持って行って見せると
10:19
and Jerry Donohue -- he was a chemist -- he said, it's wrong.
化学者のジェリー ドナヒューに却下されました
10:21
You've got -- the hydrogen atoms are in the wrong place.
水素原子の位置が間違っていると
10:25
I just put them down like they were in the books.
本の通りに置いたのですが
10:28
He said they were wrong.
彼は間違っていると言いました
10:31
So the next day, you know, after I thought, "Well, he might be right."
次の日、「彼は正しいのかも」と思いました
10:32
So I changed the locations, and then we found the base pairing,
そして水素の場所を変えてやってみてるうちに、塩基対を見出したのです
10:36
and Francis immediately said the chains run in absolute directions.
フランシスはすぐにらせんの方向は絶対的なものだということに気づきました
10:40
And we knew we were right.
明らかに正しい理論でした
10:43
So it was a pretty, you know, it all happened in about two hours.
本当に全てが2時間ほどで起きたのです
10:45
From nothing to thing.
無から有へと
10:52
And we knew it was big because, you know, if you just put A next to T
これは明らかに重要な発見だったのです。何しろもしTの隣にAをおき、
10:56
and G next to C, you have a copying mechanism.
Cの隣にGをおけば情報複製システムが成り立つのですから
11:01
So we saw how genetic information is carried.
遺伝情報がどのように受け継がれるのかが分かったのです
11:04
It's the order of the four bases.
4つの塩基の順番が重要だったのです
11:08
So in a sense, it is a sort of digital-type information.
つまり、一種のデジタル情報なわけです
11:09
And you copy it by going from strand-separating.
縒りがほどけることで情報が複製されます
11:13
So, you know, if it didn't work this way, you might as well believe it,
もしこの仕組みが間違っていたら、まあこうなんだと信じるしかないのです
11:18
because you didn't have any other scheme.
だって別の案はなかったのですから
11:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:27
But that's not the way most scientists think.
しかし一般の科学者はそのような考え方をしないのです
11:30
Most scientists are really rather dull.
ほとんどの科学者は本当に結構つまらんのです。正しいことがわかるまでは
11:33
They said, we won't think about it until we know it's right.
それについて考えないというのですから
11:36
But, you know, we thought, well, it's at least 95 percent right or 99 percent right.
でも私達は、まあ95%、もしくは99%正しいだろうと思いました
11:38
So think about it. The next five years,
だから考えてみてください。その後の5年間に
11:44
there were essentially something like five references
私たちがネイチャー誌に載せた論文は
11:48
to our work in "Nature" -- none.
たった5回しか引用されなかったのです
11:50
And so we were left by ourselves,
だから私達は誰の協力もなしに
11:53
and trying to do the last part of the trio: how do you --
3つ目の課題に取り組みました
11:55
what does this genetic information do?
つまり、この遺伝情報はどんなことをするのか、という課題です
12:00
It was pretty obvious that it provided the information
RNAに情報を提供するものだということはかなり明白でしたが
12:04
to an RNA molecule, and then how do you go from RNA to protein?
その後どのようにRNAからタンパク質に伝達されるのでしょう?
12:08
For about three years we just -- I tried to solve the structure of RNA.
約3年間、私はただRNAの構造を解明することに努めました
12:11
It didn't yield. It didn't give good x-ray photographs.
成功しませんでした。いいX線図を得ることができなかったのです
12:16
I was decidedly unhappy; a girl didn't marry me.
私は全く不幸でした。好きな子は結婚してくれなかったし
12:19
It was really, you know, sort of a shitty time.
まったくクソみたいな時期でしたよ
12:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:25
So there's a picture of Francis and I before I met the girl,
これはフランシスと私の写真です。その子に会う前ですから
12:28
so I'm still looking happy.
まだ幸せそうですね
12:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:33
But there is what we did when we didn't know
どの方向に進めばいいのか分からなかったとき、こんなことをしました
12:36
where to go forward: we formed a club and called it the RNA Tie Club.
RNAネクタイ部を結成したのです
12:39
George Gamow, also a great physicist, he designed the tie.
ネクタイをデザインしたのはジョージ ガモフで、彼もまた偉大な物理学者でした
12:45
He was one of the members. The question was:
彼は部員の一人でした。私達が知りたかったのは、
12:49
How do you go from a four-letter code
どうやって塩基の4文字のコードが
12:52
to the 20-letter code of proteins?
タンパク質の20文字のコードになるのか
12:54
Feynman was a member, and Teller, and friends of Gamow.
ファインマン、テラー、そして他にカモフの友人達もクラブのメンバーでした
12:56
But that's the only -- no, we were only photographed twice.
でも写真はこれだけ...いや、2度だけ一緒に写真を撮りました
13:01
And on both occasions, you know, one of us was missing the tie.
2回とも誰か一人が肝心のネクタイをしてなかったのですよね
13:07
There's Francis up on the upper right,
向かって左上がフランシスです
13:10
and Alex Rich -- the M.D.-turned-crystallographer -- is next to me.
右下が私で、その隣はアレックス リッチという元医者の結晶学者です
13:13
This was taken in Cambridge in September of 1955.
これは1955年の9月にケンブリッジで撮ったものです
13:18
And I'm smiling, sort of forced, I think,
私は笑っていますが、作り笑いだったと思います
13:22
because the girl I had, boy, she was gone.
何しろその子はもういなかったのですから
13:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:31
And so I didn't really get happy until 1960,
私が本気で再び喜びを感じ始めたのは1960年でした
13:35
because then we found out, basically, you know,
なぜならその頃
13:40
that there are three forms of RNA.
RNAには3種類あるということを発見したからです
13:44
And we knew, basically, DNA provides the information for RNA.
そしてDNAはRNAに、RNAはタンパク質に情報を提供する
13:46
RNA provides the information for protein.
ということが分かったのです
13:49
And that let Marshall Nirenberg, you know, take RNA -- synthetic RNA --
そしてマーシャル ニーレンバーグがタンパク質生成系に合成したRNAを投入し
13:51
put it in a system making protein. He made polyphenylalanine,
ポリフェニルアラニンを作ることに成功しました
13:56
polyphenylalanine. So that's the first cracking of the genetic code,
遺伝子コードが初めて解読されたのです
14:02
and it was all over by 1966.
1966年までには完全に解明し終えたのです
14:10
So there, that's what Chris wanted me to do, it was --
だからクリスが私に話してほしかったのは
14:12
so what happened since then?
その後の進展についてです
14:15
Well, at that time -- I should go back.
少し戻りますが
14:19
When we found the structure of DNA, I gave my first talk
初めてDNAの構造を発見した頃、
14:22
at Cold Spring Harbor. The physicist, Leo Szilard,
コールド スプリング ハーバーでの初講義で物理学者のレオ シラードに
14:27
he looked at me and said, "Are you going to patent this?"
「特許を取るつもりは?」と聞かれました
14:30
And -- but he knew patent law, and that we couldn't patent it,
でも彼は特許法をよく知っていて、この発見での特許取得は不可能だと分かっていました
14:33
because you couldn't. No use for it.
何の役にも立ちゃしませんから
14:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:40
And so DNA didn't become a useful molecule,
だからDNAは大して役に立つ分子にはなりませんでしたし、
14:42
and the lawyers didn't enter into the equation until 1973,
1973年までは法律家とは無縁でした
14:46
20 years later, when Boyer and Cohen in San Francisco
発見から20年後、スタンフォード大学のボイヤーとコーエンがサンフランシスコで
14:51
and Stanford came up with their method of recombinant DNA,
組換えDNAの仕組みを発見し
14:56
and Stanford patented it and made a lot of money.
スタンフォードが特許権を取得して大もうけしたのです
14:58
At least they patented something
少なくとも特許権を得ただけいいですね
15:01
which, you know, could do useful things.
役に立つこともありますから
15:02
And then, they learned how to read the letters for the code.
次に、彼らはコードの解読を研究しました
15:05
And, boom, we've, you know, had a biotech industry. And,
いっきにバイオテクノロジー産業が出現しました
15:08
but we were still a long ways from, you know,
でも、まだまだ道のりは長かったのです
15:13
answering a question which sort of dominated my childhood,
子供の頃に私を捉えていた疑問
15:20
which is: How do you nature-nurture?
「生まれか育ちか」という問題の答えにたどり着くまでには
15:22
And so I'll go on. I'm already out of time,
時間切れですが、もう少し話を続けましょう
15:27
but this is Michael Wigler, a very, very clever mathematician
これはマイケル ウィグラーというとっても賢い
15:31
turned physicist. And he developed a technique
元数学者の物理学者です
15:34
which essentially will let us look at sample DNA
DNAのサンプルについて、その上の膨大な点を調べられる
15:37
and, eventually, a million spots along it.
技法を開発しました
15:41
There's a chip there, a conventional one. Then there's one
左は従来のチップで、右はニンブルジェン社が
15:43
made by a photolithography by a company in Madison
フォトリソグラフィで作成したものです
15:46
called NimbleGen, which is way ahead of Affymetrix.
アフィメトリックス社よりずっと進んでいます
15:49
And we use their technique.
私達はニンブルジェン社のものを使っているのです
15:54
And what you can do is sort of compare DNA of normal segs versus cancer.
この技法は正常なDNAと癌のものの比較を可能にします
15:56
And you can see on the top
この上のものを見ると分かるように
16:01
that cancers which are bad show insertions or deletions.
癌のひどいものは遺伝子が挿入されたり削除されたりしています
16:05
So the DNA is really badly mucked up,
だからDNA はかなりめちゃくちゃなのです
16:10
whereas if you have a chance of surviving,
反対にもし生存可能ならば
16:13
the DNA isn't so mucked up.
DNAはそこまでめちゃくちゃではないのです
16:15
So we think that this will eventually lead to what we call
この技法はいつかいわゆる
16:17
"DNA biopsies." Before you get treated for cancer,
“DNAバイオプシー”を可能にするでしょう。だから癌治療を受けに行く前に
16:20
you should really look at this technique,
必ずこの技法について調べて、
16:24
and get a feeling of the face of the enemy.
闘っている病がどんなものか理解しておくべきなのです
16:26
It's not a -- it's only a partial look, but it's a --
完璧に状態を把握することはできないけれど、
16:29
I think it's going to be very, very useful.
それはとても役に立つでしょう
16:32
So, we started with breast cancer
私達はまず乳癌に取り組みました
16:35
because there's lots of money for it, no government money.
なぜならそのための研究費がいっぱいありますから、政府からは全くですが
16:37
And now I have a sort of vested interest:
それから私が個人的に強い関心があるのは
16:40
I want to do it for prostate cancer. So, you know,
前立腺癌のための研究です
16:44
you aren't treated if it's not dangerous.
治療を受ける必要のない患者が治療を受けるということがないように
16:46
But Wigler, besides looking at cancer cells, looked at normal cells,
ウィグラーは、癌細胞以外にも正常な細胞を観察し、
16:49
and made a really sort of surprising observation.
かなり意外なことに気付きました
16:55
Which is, all of us have about 10 places in our genome
それは、私達は誰でも遺伝子が不足しているか余分にある場所が
16:58
where we've lost a gene or gained another one.
ゲノムに10 箇所くらいあるということです
17:02
So we're sort of all imperfect. And the question is well,
つまり私達はみなある意味不完全なのです
17:05
if we're around here, you know,
それでも私達が生きているということは、
17:11
these little losses or gains might not be too bad.
別に多少多くても足りなくても大して問題ないのかもしれません
17:13
But if these deletions or amplifications occurred in the wrong gene,
でもそのような削除や挿入が遺伝子の具合の悪い場所で起きると
17:16
maybe we'll feel sick.
病気になるのかもしれません
17:21
So the first disease he looked at is autism.
彼が最初にみてみたのは自閉症でした
17:22
And the reason we looked at autism is we had the money to do it.
自閉症に注目したのは、そのための研究費があったからです
17:26
Looking at an individual is about 3,000 dollars. And the parent of a child
調査は一人につき約3,000ドルかかります
17:31
with Asperger's disease, the high-intelligence autism,
自閉症の一種、アスペルガー症の子の両親が
17:36
had sent his thing to a conventional company; they didn't do it.
その子のデータを一般の会社に送ったのですが引き受けてもらえませんでした
17:38
Couldn't do it by conventional genetics, but just scanning it
伝統的な遺伝子論では解釈できなかったのですが、
17:43
we began to find genes for autism.
私達はスキャンしただけで自閉症の遺伝子を識別できました
17:46
And you can see here, there are a lot of them.
ここに見えるように、実にたくさんあります
17:49
So a lot of autistic kids are autistic
つまり自閉症の子供の多くは
17:53
because they just lost a big piece of DNA.
DNAに大きな欠損があるのです
17:57
I mean, big piece at the molecular level.
相当なと言っても、それは分子のレベルの話です
17:59
We saw one autistic kid,
ある自閉症の子は、
18:01
about five million bases just missing from one of his chromosomes.
染色体の一つに500万の塩基が欠けていました
18:03
We haven't yet looked at the parents, but the parents probably
まだ両親のものは見ていませんが、おそらく両親に同様の欠損はないでしょう
18:06
don't have that loss, or they wouldn't be parents.
そうじゃなきゃ親にはなれませんから
18:09
Now, so, our autism study is just beginning. We got three million dollars.
私達の自閉症の研究はまだ始まったばかりです。研究費は300万ドルあります
18:12
I think it will cost at least 10 to 20 before you'd be in a position
最低1000万から2000万ドル必要なのではないでしょうか、
18:19
to help parents who've had an autistic child,
自分の子供が自閉症かもしれないと思っている人や
18:23
or think they may have an autistic child,
自閉症の子を持つ人の力になって
18:26
and can we spot the difference?
問題を特定できるようになるまでには
18:28
So this same technique should probably look at all.
だからこの技法はおそらく全てに適用するべきなのでしょう
18:30
It's a wonderful way to find genes.
遺伝子を認定するのには最適な方法です
18:33
And so, I'll conclude by saying
それでは最後に、私達が研究した
18:37
we've looked at 20 people with schizophrenia.
20人の統合失調症患者についてお話しましょう
18:39
And we thought we'd probably have to look at several hundred
全体像が見えるまでには数百の症例を見る必要があると思っていました
18:41
before we got the picture. But as you can see,
でもご覧の通り
18:45
there's seven out of 20 had a change which was very high.
20のうち7人に違いが見られました。これは相当な数です、
18:47
And yet, in the controls there were three.
対照群では3人だったのですから
18:51
So what's the meaning of the controls?
これはどういうことなのでしょう?
18:54
Were they crazy also, and we didn't know it?
異常があるのに気付かなかったんでしょうか?
18:56
Or, you know, were they normal? I would guess they're normal.
それとも、彼らは正常だったのでしょうか。おそらく正常だったのでしょうね
18:58
And what we think in schizophrenia is there are genes of predisposure,
統合失調症にかかりやすくなる遺伝子があるのではないかと思います
19:02
and whether this is one that predisposes --
そしてそのかかりやすくなるのがあるかどうかによって
19:09
and then there's only a sub-segment of the population
実際に統合失調症になり得るグループが
19:15
that's capable of being schizophrenic.
決まるのだと思います
19:19
Now, we don't have really any evidence of it,
はっきりとした証拠があるわけではないのですが
19:21
but I think, to give you a hypothesis, the best guess
私の仮説をお話すると
19:25
is that if you're left-handed, you're prone to schizophrenia.
左利きの人は統合失調症になる可能性が高いのです
19:30
30 percent of schizophrenic people are left-handed,
統合失調症の人の30パーセントは左利きです
19:36
and schizophrenia has a very funny genetics,
また統合失調症にはとっても変わった遺伝子がみられます
19:39
which means 60 percent of the people are genetically left-handed,
つまり60パーセントの人が遺伝子上は左利きなのですが
19:42
but only half of it showed. I don't have the time to say.
そのうち半数の人しか左利きにならなかったのです
19:46
Now, some people who think they're right-handed
自分は右利きだと思っている人の中には
19:49
are genetically left-handed. OK. I'm just saying that, if you think,
遺伝的には左利きの人がいるのです。そういうのも
19:52
oh, I don't carry a left-handed gene so therefore my, you know,
自分は左利きの遺伝子がないから
19:58
children won't be at risk of schizophrenia. You might. OK?
子供が統合失調症になる可能性はないと思うかもしれませんが、そうではないのですよ
20:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:05
So it's, to me, an extraordinarily exciting time.
私にとって今は非常にわくわくする時代です
20:08
We ought to be able to find the gene for bipolar;
躁鬱病の遺伝子も見つかるでしょう
20:11
there's a relationship.
はっきりとした傾向があるはずです
20:13
And if I had enough money, we'd find them all this year.
もし費用が足りれば、全て今年発見できるでしょう
20:14
I thank you.
どうもありがとう
20:18
Translated by Natsu Fukui
Reviewed by Yasushi Aoki

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

James Watson - Biologist, Nobel laureate
Nobel laureate James Watson took part in one of the most important scientific breakthroughs of the 20th century: the discovery of the structure of DNA. More than 50 years later, he continues to investigate biology's deepest secrets.

Why you should listen

James Watson has led a long, remarkable life, starting at age 12, when he was one of radio's high-IQ Quiz Kids. By age 15, he had enrolled in the University of Chicago, and by 25, working with Francis Crick (and drawing, controversially, on the research of Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin), he had made the discovery that would eventually win the three men the Nobel Prize.

Watson and Crick's 1953 discovery of DNA's double-helix structure paved the way for the astounding breakthroughs in genetics and medicine that marked the second half of the 20th century. And Watson's classic 1968 memoir of the discovery, The Double Helix, changed the way the public perceives scientists, thanks to its candid account of the personality conflicts on the project.

From 1988 to 1994, he ran the Human Genome Project. His current passion is the quest to identify genetic bases for major illnesses; in 2007 he put his fully sequenced genome online, the second person to do so, in an effort to encourage personalized medicine and early detection and prevention of diseases. 

More profile about the speaker
James Watson | Speaker | TED.com