sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2011

Charles Hazlewood: Trusting the ensemble

チャールズ・ヘイゼルウッド 「信頼がつくるアンサンブル」

July 13, 2011

指揮者チャールズ・ヘイゼルウッドが演奏のリーダーシップにおける信頼の役割について話します。それがどう機能するものなのかステージでスコットランド・アンサンブルを指揮しながら示します。またオペラ「ウ・カルメン・イ・カエリチャ」と「パラオーケストラ」の2つの音楽プロジェクトをビデオで紹介します。

Charles Hazlewood - Conductor
Charles Hazlewood dusts off and invigorates classical music, adding a youthful energy and modern twists to centuries-old masterworks. At TEDGlobal, he conducts the Scottish Ensemble. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I am a conductor,
私は指揮者ですが
00:15
and I'm here today
今日は皆さんに
00:17
to talk to you about trust.
信頼についてお話しします
00:19
My job depends upon it.
これは 私の仕事が基礎とするものです
00:21
There has to be, between me and the orchestra,
指揮者とオーケストラの間には
00:24
an unshakable bond of trust,
揺るぎない絆が必要であり
00:26
born out of mutual respect,
それは互いへの尊敬から生まれるものです
00:28
through which we can spin a musical narrative
それを通して私たちが信じるところの
00:31
that we all believe in.
音楽の物語を紡ぎ出すのです
00:34
Now in the old days, conducting, music making,
昔は指揮というと 信頼というよりも
00:36
was less about trust and more, frankly, about coercion.
率直なところ強制でさせるものでした
00:39
Up to and around about the Second World War,
第二次世界大戦以前の指揮者というと
00:42
conductors were invariably dictators --
みんな独裁者でした
00:44
these tyrannical figures
専制君主のような存在で
00:46
who would rehearse, not just the orchestra as a whole, but individuals within it,
オーケストラ全体ばかりでなく
00:48
within an inch of their lives.
個々のメンバーの生活の細部まで指図していました
00:51
But I'm happy to say now that the world has moved on,
幸い世界は進歩して
00:54
music has moved on with it.
その中で音楽も進歩しました
00:56
We now have a more democratic view and way of making music --
今ではもっと民主的な見方と方法がとられており
00:58
a two-way street.
もはや一方通行ではありません
01:01
I, as the conductor, have to come to the rehearsal with a cast-iron sense
私は指揮者として
01:03
of the outer architecture of that music,
音楽のしっかりした外枠を用意する必要がありますが
01:06
within which there is then immense personal freedom
その中には大きな自由があって
01:09
for the members of the orchestra to shine.
オーケストラのメンバーを輝かせるのです
01:12
For myself, of course,
私はまた
01:14
I have to completely trust my body language.
自分のボディランゲージを強く信頼する必要があります
01:16
That's all I have at the point of sale.
それが私に使えるすべてだからです
01:20
It's silent gesture.
無言の身振りです
01:22
I can hardly bark out instructions while we're playing.
演奏中に大声で指示するわけにはいきません
01:24
(Music)
(演奏)
01:29
Ladies and gentlemen, the Scottish Ensemble.
ご紹介します スコットランド・アンサンブルです
02:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:53
So in order for all this to work,
この全体を機能させるには
03:00
obviously I have got to be in a position of trust.
信頼を築く必要があります
03:02
I have to trust the orchestra,
オーケストラへの信頼が必要であり
03:04
and, even more crucially, I have to trust myself.
さらに重要なのは 自分自身への信頼です
03:06
Think about it: when you're in a position of not trusting,
考えてください
03:08
what do you do?
信頼がなかったら何ができるでしょう?
03:10
You overcompensate.
埋め合わせようと
03:12
And in my game, that means you overgesticulate.
オーバーなジェスチャーをし
03:14
You end up like some kind of rabid windmill.
狂った風車みたいになることでしょう
03:16
And the bigger your gesture gets,
ジェスチャーが大きくなるほど
03:18
the more ill-defined, blurry
不明瞭であいまいになり
03:20
and, frankly, useless it is to the orchestra.
オーケストラの役には立ちません
03:22
You become a figure of fun. There's no trust anymore, only ridicule.
滑稽なだけです 信頼は消え 嘲りだけが残るでしょう
03:24
And I remember at the beginning of my career,
指揮を始めた頃のことをよく覚えています
03:27
again and again, on these dismal outings with orchestras,
惨めなオーケストラ公演の繰り返しで
03:29
I would be going completely insane on the podium,
私が指揮台の上でムキになって
03:31
trying to engender a small scale crescendo really,
ちょっとしたクレッシェンドを—
03:34
just a little upsurge in volume.
ほんの小さな高まりを作ろうとしても
03:36
Bugger me, they wouldn't give it to me.
オーケストラは応えてくれません
03:38
I spent a lot of time in those early years
始めの頃はよく控え室で
03:40
weeping silently in dressing rooms.
長いこと静かに泣いていたものです
03:42
And how futile seemed the words of advice to me
イギリスのベテラン指揮者コリン・デイヴィスのアドバイスも
03:44
from great British veteran conductor Sir Colin Davis
無意味に思えました
03:47
who said, "Conducting, Charles,
「指揮というのはね チャールズ
03:49
is like holding a small bird in your hand.
小鳥をつかむようなものなんだ
03:51
If you hold it too tightly, you crush it.
握るのが強すぎたら小鳥を潰してしまう
03:53
If you hold it too loosely, it flies away."
握るのが緩すぎたら逃げてしまう」
03:56
I have to say, in those days, I couldn't really even find the bird.
当時の私にはその鳥を見つけることさえできない気がしました
03:59
Now a fundamental
私にとって
04:02
and really viscerally important experience for me, in terms of music,
音楽における根本的で本質的に重要な経験となったのは
04:04
has been my adventures in South Africa,
南アフリカでの冒険でした
04:07
the most dizzyingly musical country on the planet in my view,
地上でこれほどめくるめく音楽的な国はちょっとないでしょう
04:09
but a country which, through its musical culture,
その音楽文化を通して
04:12
has taught me one fundamental lesson:
1つ極めて根本的な教訓を教えてくれました
04:14
that through music making
ともに音楽をやる中で
04:17
can come deep levels
根源的な深いレベルの
04:19
of fundamental life-giving trust.
生きた信頼を生み出すことでができるということです
04:21
Back in 2000, I had the opportunity to go to South Africa
2000年に南アフリカで新しい歌劇団の結成に
04:24
to form a new opera company.
取り組む機会がありました
04:27
So I went out there, and I auditioned,
現地に赴き 主に国内あちこちの
04:29
mainly in rural township locations, right around the country.
非白人居住区でオーディションをしました
04:31
I heard about 2,000 singers
2,000人の歌手の歌を聴き
04:33
and pulled together a company
驚くばかりの才能に溢れた
04:35
of 40 of the most jaw-droppingly amazing young performers,
若い歌手40人からなる歌劇団を作りました
04:37
the majority of whom were black,
大半は黒人でしたが
04:40
but there were a handful of white performers.
白人の歌手も何人かいました
04:42
Now it emerged early on in the first rehearsal period
最初のリハーサルのとき
04:44
that one of those white performers
白人歌手の一人が
04:46
had, in his previous incarnation,
以前 南アフリカ警官隊の
04:48
been a member of the South African police force.
一員だったことがわかりました
04:50
And in the last years of the old regime,
旧体制の終わりの時期には
04:52
he would routinely be detailed to go into the township
非白人居住区の人々への攻撃に
04:54
to aggress the community.
たびたび派遣されていました
04:57
Now you can imagine what this knowledge did to the temperature in the room,
この情報がその場の空気に及ぼした影響は
04:59
the general atmosphere.
想像に難くないでしょう
05:02
Let's be under no illusions.
現実に目を向けましょう
05:04
In South Africa, the relationship most devoid of trust
南アフリカで何よりも信頼がないのは
05:06
is that between a white policeman
白人警官と
05:09
and the black community.
黒人コミュニティの間です
05:11
So how do we recover from that, ladies and gentlemen?
どうやってそこから立ち直ったと思いますか?
05:13
Simply through singing.
歌を通してです
05:15
We sang, we sang,
私たちは ただひたすら
05:17
we sang,
歌い続けました
05:20
and amazingly new trust grew,
すると驚くことに信頼が芽生え
05:22
and indeed friendship blossomed.
友情が花開いたのです
05:24
And that showed me such a fundamental truth,
それは深い真実に気づかせてくれました
05:26
that music making and other forms of creativity
音楽やその他の創造的活動というのは
05:28
can so often go to places
時に言葉では辿り着けない場所へと
05:31
where mere words cannot.
連れて行ってくれるのです
05:33
So we got some shows off the ground. We started touring them internationally.
私たちは公演や海外ツアーをするようになり
05:36
One of them was "Carmen."
演目の1つは「カルメン」でしたが
05:38
We then thought we'd make a movie of "Carmen,"
その映画を作ろうという話になって
05:40
which we recorded and shot outside on location
ケープタウン郊外のカエリチャという
05:42
in the township outside Cape Town called Khayelitsha.
非白人居住区で収録と撮影をしました
05:44
The piece was sung entirely in Xhosa,
曲は全部コーサ語で歌われています
05:46
which is a beautifully musical language, if you don't know it.
美しい音楽的な言葉です
05:48
It's called "U-Carmen e-Khayelitsha" --
タイトルは「ウ・カルメン・イ・カエリチャ」
05:51
literally "Carmen of Khayelitsha."
「カエリチャのカルメン」という意味です
05:53
I want to play you a tiny clip of it now
南アフリカの音楽が
05:55
for no other reason than to give you proof positive
どれほどのものか示す証拠として
05:57
that there is nothing tiny about South African music making.
映画の一部をご覧いただきたいと思います
05:59
(Music)
(音楽)
06:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:15
Something which I find utterly enchanting
南アフリカの音楽表現で
07:22
about South African music making
私がすっかり魅了されたのは
07:25
is that it's so free.
その自由さです
07:27
South Africans just make music really freely.
彼らは本当に自由に音楽を生み出すのです
07:29
And I think, in no small way,
その少なからぬ部分は
07:31
that's due to one fundamental fact:
彼らが表記法に囚われないという
07:33
they're not bound to a system of notation.
根本的な事実によるのだと思います
07:35
They don't read music.
彼らは楽譜を読みません
07:37
They trust their ears.
自分の耳を信頼しているのです
07:39
You can teach a bunch of South Africans a tune in about five seconds flat.
たくさんの南アフリカ人相手に旋律を5秒で教えられ
07:41
And then, as if by magic,
彼らは魔法のように
07:44
they will spontaneously improvise a load of harmony around that tune
その旋律をベースにたくさんのハーモニーを即興で作り出します
07:46
because they can.
単にそうできるのです
07:49
Now those of us that live in the West, if I can use that term,
西洋に住む我々の音楽に対する態度や感覚は
07:51
I think have a much more hidebound attitude or sense of music --
ずっと融通が利かないものです
07:54
that somehow it's all about skill and systems.
スキルとシステムがすべてです
07:57
Therefore it's the exclusive preserve
一部のエリート
08:00
of an elite, talented body.
才能ある人間だけのものです
08:03
And yet, ladies and gentlemen, every single one of us on this planet
それでもこの地球上の誰もが
08:05
probably engages with music on a daily basis.
日々音楽に関わっているのです
08:08
And if I can broaden this out for a second,
もっと一般的なところでは
08:11
I'm willing to bet that every single one of you sitting in this room
ここにいる誰もがまったくの自信を持って
08:13
would be happy to speak with acuity, with total confidence,
映画や文学について
08:16
about movies, probably about literature.
嬉々として話すことでしょうが
08:18
But how many of you would be able to make a confident assertion
クラシック音楽の曲となると 自信を持って語れる人が
08:21
about a piece of classical music?
どれほどいるでしょう?
08:24
Why is this?
なぜそうなのでしょう?
08:27
And what I'm going to say to you now
私が言いたいのは
08:29
is I'm just urging you to get over
その極度の自信のなさを克服し
08:31
this supreme lack of self-confidence,
飛躍して欲しいということです
08:33
to take the plunge, to believe that you can trust your ears,
自分の耳を信頼し
08:35
you can hear some of the fundamental muscle tissue,
名曲を名曲たらしめている
08:38
fiber, DNA,
基本的な筋組織 神経 DNAを
08:40
what makes a great piece of music great.
聞き取れるのだと信じてほしいのです
08:42
I've got a little experiment I want to try with you.
それでひとつ実験をしたいと思います
08:45
Did you know
TEDが旋律を表しているのは
08:47
that TED is a tune?
ご存じでしたか?
08:49
A very simple tune based on three notes -- T, E, D.
3つの音からなるシンプルな調べです T E D
08:51
Now hang on a minute.
ちょっと待ってください
08:54
I know you're going to say to me, "T doesn't exist in music."
「Tなんて音はない」と言いたいのはわかります
08:56
Well ladies and gentlemen, there's a time-honored system,
実は作曲家たちが何百年も使ってきた
08:59
which composers have been using for hundreds of years,
伝統的な表記法では
09:01
which proves actually that it does.
Tという音は確かにあるのです
09:03
If I sing you a musical scale: A, B, C, D, E, F, G --
音階をA B C D E F G と歌った後
09:06
and I just carry on with the next set of letters in the alphabet, same scale:
アルファベットの続きにそのまま進むのです
09:10
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
H I J K L M N
09:13
O, P, Q, R, S, T -- there you go.
O P Q R S T ほら
09:16
T, see it's the same as F in music.
これは通常のFと同じです
09:18
So T is F.
TはFなのです
09:20
So T, E, D is the same as F, E, D.
だからT E DはF E Dになります
09:22
Now that piece of music that we played at the start of this session
講演のはじめに演奏した
09:24
had enshrined in its heart
曲の主題の中には
09:27
the theme, which is TED.
TEDが埋め込まれていました
09:29
Have a listen.
お聞きください
09:31
(Music)
(演奏)
09:34
Do you hear it?
わかりましたか?
09:41
Or do I smell some doubt in the room?
なんか疑いの空気が漂っていますね
09:43
Okay, we'll play it for you again now,
もう一度やりましょう
09:45
and we're going to highlight, we're going to poke out the T, E, D.
TEDが際立って突き出すようにやりましょう
09:47
If you'll pardon the expression.
お下品でごめんなさい
09:50
(Music)
(演奏)
09:53
Oh my goodness me, there it was loud and clear, surely.
大きな音ではっきり聞こえましたね
10:00
I think we should make this even more explicit.
もっとはっきりさせましょう
10:03
Ladies and gentlemen, it's nearly time for tea.
皆さん もうすぐお茶の時間です
10:04
Would you reckon you need to sing for your tea, I think?
お茶をいただくには歌わなくちゃいけません
10:06
I think we need to sing for our tea.
お茶のためにみんなで歌いましょう
10:08
We're going to sing those three wonderful notes: T, E, D.
この素晴らしい3つの音 TEDを歌うんです
10:10
Will you have a go for me?
やってもらえますか?
10:13
Audience: T, E, D.
(聴衆) T E D
10:15
Charles Hazlewood: Yeah, you sound a bit more like cows really than human beings.
人よりは牛の声みたいでしたね
10:17
Shall we try that one again?
もう一度やりましょうか
10:20
And look, if you're adventurous, you go up the octave.
思い切ってオクターブ上げて
10:22
T, E, D.
T E D
10:24
Audience: T, E, D.
(聴衆) T E D
10:26
CH: Once more with vim. (Audience: T, E, D.)
もう一度元気よく (聴衆: T E D)
10:28
There I am like a bloody windmill again, you see.
また狂った風車に戻った感じです
10:31
Now we're going to put that in the context of the music.
今度は音楽のコンテキストの中でやってみましょう
10:33
The music will start, and then at a signal from me, you will sing that.
演奏が始まったら 私の合図で皆さん歌ってください
10:36
(Music)
(演奏)
10:41
One more time,
もう一度
10:53
with feeling, ladies and gentlemen.
気持ちを込めて
10:55
You won't make the key otherwise.
そうしないとお茶はなしですよ
10:57
Well done, ladies and gentlemen.
皆さん大変よくできました
11:00
It wasn't a bad debut for the TED choir,
TED合唱団のデビューとしては
11:02
not a bad debut at all.
悪くありません
11:05
Now there's a project that I'm initiating at the moment
今立ち上げようとしているプロジェクトで
11:08
that I'm very excited about and wanted to share with you,
夢中になっているものがあるのでご紹介したい
11:10
because it is all about changing perceptions,
これはみんなの認識を変え
11:12
and, indeed, building a new level of trust.
新たなレベルの信頼を作り出すものです
11:14
The youngest of my children was born with cerebral palsy,
私の末の子は生まれながらの脳性麻痺で
11:17
which as you can imagine,
それを受け入れるのがいかに大きなことかは
11:20
if you don't have an experience of it yourself,
自分で経験しなければ
11:22
is quite a big thing to take on board.
分からないと思います
11:24
But the gift that my gorgeous daughter has given me,
私の素晴らしい娘が私に与えてくれた贈り物が何かというと
11:26
aside from her very existence,
その子の存在そのものを別にすると
11:29
is that it's opened my eyes to a whole stretch of the community
これまで見えていなかった
11:31
that was hitherto hidden,
身障者コミュニティの広がりに
11:34
the community of disabled people.
私の目を見開かせてくれたことです
11:36
And I found myself looking at the Paralympics and thinking how incredible
パラリンピックを見たとき
11:38
how technology's been harnessed to prove beyond doubt
最高レベルの運動能力を達成するのに
11:41
that disability is no barrier
身体障害は壁にならないと示す上で
11:44
to the highest levels of sporting achievement.
テクノロジーがいかに有用か感心しました
11:46
Of course there's a grimmer side to that truth,
もっともこの事実には厳しい側面もあり
11:48
which is that it's actually taken decades for the world at large
身障者とスポーツは 面白く訴求力あるものとして
11:50
to come to a position of trust,
結びつきうるということを
11:53
to really believe that disability and sports can go together
世界の多くの人が理解し信頼するようになるには
11:56
in a convincing and interesting fashion.
何十年もかかったのです
11:59
So I find myself asking:
それで自問しました
12:02
where is music in all of this?
その点音楽はどうなんだろう?
12:04
You can't tell me that there aren't millions of disabled people,
イギリスに限っても
12:06
in the U.K. alone,
優れた音楽の潜在能力を持つ身障者が
12:08
with massive musical potential.
何百万といることでしょう
12:10
So I decided to create a platform for that potential.
だからその能力を育む基盤を作ることにしました
12:13
It's going to be Britain's first ever
これはイギリス初の
12:16
national disabled orchestra.
身障者のための国立オーケストラで
12:18
It's called Paraorchestra.
「パラオーケストラ」という名前です
12:20
I'm going to show you a clip now
最初に即興セッションをしたときの
12:22
of the very first improvisation session that we had.
ビデオをご覧いただきます
12:24
It was a really extraordinary moment.
本当にものすごい体験でした
12:26
Just me and four astonishingly gifted disabled musicians.
驚くほどの才能を持つ4人の障害者演奏家と私だけでやりました
12:28
Normally when you improvise --
即興をするときは通常
12:31
and I do it all the time around the world --
私は世界中でやっていますが
12:34
there's this initial period of horror,
はじめに緊迫した時間帯があって
12:36
like everyone's too frightened to throw the hat into the ring,
みんな始めるのを怖れ
12:38
an awful pregnant silence.
腹を探り合うような重い沈黙があるのですが
12:40
Then suddenly, as if by magic, bang! We're all in there
それから突然魔法のようにはじけ
12:42
and it's complete bedlam. You can't hear anything.
大騒ぎのようになって 何も聞こえず
12:44
No one's listening. No one's trusting.
誰も聞かず 信頼などどこにもなく
12:46
No one's responding to each other.
音楽的な受け応えもないのです
12:48
Now in this room with these four disabled musicians,
それがこの4人の身障者演奏家の場合
12:51
within five minutes
5分もせずに
12:53
a rapt listening, a rapt response
うっとりと聞き うっとりと応じ
12:55
and some really insanely beautiful music.
そして並外れて美しい音楽を奏でたのです
12:57
(Video) (Music)
(ビデオ)
13:02
Nicholas:: My name's Nicholas McCarthy.
(ニコラス) 僕はニコラス・マッカーシー
13:10
I'm 22, and I'm a left-handed pianist.
22歳の 左利きピアニストです
13:12
And I was born without my left hand -- right hand.
左手を持たずに生まれてきました・・・というか右手を
13:14
Can I do that one again?
もう一度お願いできますか?
13:17
(Music)
(演奏)
13:20
Lyn: When I'm making music,
(リン) 音楽を作っていると
13:27
I feel like a pilot in the cockpit flying an airplane.
飛行機を操縦しているパイロットのような気分になります
13:29
I become alive.
生きているんだと
13:32
(Music)
(演奏)
13:34
Clarence: I would rather be able to play an instrument again
(クラレンス) 歩けるようになるよりも
13:45
than walk.
楽器をまた演奏できるようになりたい
13:48
There's so much joy and things
楽器を弾き
13:50
I could get from playing an instrument and performing.
パフォーマンスすることで得られる喜びはとても大きく
13:52
It's removed some of my paralysis.
麻痺の一部を取り除きさえしてくれた
13:56
(Music)
(演奏)
14:00
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:15
CH: I only wish that some of those musicians were here with us today,
あの音楽家の中の誰かがこの場にいてくれたらと思います
14:22
so you could see at firsthand how utterly extraordinary they are.
彼らがどれほど素晴らしいか直接見ることができたでしょう
14:25
Paraorchestra is the name of that project.
パラオーケストラがこのプロジェクトの名前です
14:28
If any of you thinks you want to help me in any way
今はまだ信じがたく不可能に思える
14:30
to achieve what is a fairly impossible and implausible dream still at this point,
この夢の実現のために どんな形であれ手を貸してくださる方は
14:32
please let me know.
どうか知らせてください
14:35
Now my parting shot
最後に
14:37
comes courtesy of the great Joseph Haydn,
偉大なヨーゼフ・ハイドンの話をしましょう
14:39
wonderful Austrian composer in the second half of the 18th century --
18世紀後半オーストリアのすばらしい作曲家で
14:41
spent the bulk of his life
生涯の大半を
14:44
in the employ of Prince Nikolaus Esterhazy, along with his orchestra.
楽団とともにニコラウス・エステルハージに仕えました
14:46
Now this prince loved his music,
エステルハージ公は音楽好きでしたが 片田舎の城が
14:49
but he also loved the country castle that he tended to reside in most of the time,
気に入っていて 多くの時をそこで過ごしていました
14:52
which is just on the Austro-Hungarian border,
オーストリア=ハンガリー帝国の
14:55
a place called Esterhazy --
国境に近い エステルハージという
14:57
a long way from the big city of Vienna.
大都会ウィーンからは遠く隔たった場所です
14:59
Now one day in 1772,
1772年のある日
15:01
the prince decreed that the musicians' families,
エステルハージ公は 楽団員の家族を
15:03
the orchestral musicians' families,
今後城に受け入れないという
15:05
were no longer welcome in the castle.
布告を出しました
15:07
They weren't allowed to stay there anymore; they had to be returned to Vienna --
城にいられなくなり ウィーンに帰らなければなりません
15:09
as I say, an unfeasibly long way away in those days.
当時は滅多に行き来できないような遠隔地です
15:12
You can imagine, the musicians were disconsolate.
音楽家たちがいかに悲嘆に暮れたか想像に難くないでしょう
15:15
Haydn remonstrated with the prince, but to no avail.
ハイドンがエステルハージ公に諫言しても聞き入れられません
15:19
So given the prince loved his music,
エステルハージ公は音楽好きだったので
15:22
Haydn thought he'd write a symphony to make the point.
ハイドンは交響曲で気持ちを伝えることにしました
15:24
And we're going to play just the very tail end of this symphony now.
その曲の最後の部分をこれからお聴かせします
15:27
And you'll see the orchestra in a kind of sullen revolt.
オーケストラが一種の反抗を示すのがわかるでしょう
15:30
I'm pleased to say, the prince did take the tip
幸いエステルハージ公は
15:33
from the orchestral performance,
その演奏の心を察し 音楽家たちは再び
15:35
and the musicians were reunited with their families.
家族と暮らせるようになりました
15:37
But I think it sums up my talk rather well, this,
これは私の話の要点をよく示していると思います
15:39
that where there is trust,
信頼ある所に
15:42
there is music -- by extension life.
音楽は生き続け
15:44
Where there is no trust,
信頼ない所で
15:47
the music quite simply withers away.
音楽はしおれてしまうのです
15:49
(Music)
(演奏)
15:56
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:06
Translator:Yasushi Aoki
Reviewer:Akiko Hicks

sponsored links

Charles Hazlewood - Conductor
Charles Hazlewood dusts off and invigorates classical music, adding a youthful energy and modern twists to centuries-old masterworks. At TEDGlobal, he conducts the Scottish Ensemble.

Why you should listen

Charles Hazlewood's fresh presentations of classical music shake up the traditional settings of the form -- in one performance he’ll engage in a conversation with the audience, while in another he’ll blend film or sculpture into a piece -- but his goal is always the same: exposing the deep, always-modern joy of the classics. He's a familiar face on British TV, notably in the 2009 series The Birth of British Music on BBC2. He conducts the BBC Orchestras and guest-conducts orchestras around the world.

Together with Mark Dornford-May, he founded a lyric-theatre company in South Africa called Dimpho Di Kopane (which means "combined talents") after auditioning in the townships and villages of South Africa. Of the 40 members, only three had professional training. They debuted with Bizet's Carmen, which was later transposed into a movie version called U-Carmen eKhayelitsha, spoken and sung in Xhosa, that was honored at the Berlin Flim Festival. He regularly involves children in his projects and curates his own music festival, Play the Field, on his farm in Somerset. His latest project: the ParaOrchestra.

He says: "I have loads of issues with the way classical music is presented. It has been too reverential, too 'high art' -- if you're not in the club, they're not going to let you join. It's like The Turin Shroud: don't touch it because it might fall apart."

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.