sponsored links
TEDMED 2013

Andrew Solomon: Love, no matter what

アンドリュー・ソロモン: 揺るぎなき愛

April 24, 2013

自分と根本的に異質な子供(例えば天才児、あるいは特異な才能を持った子供や犯罪に手を染めた子供など)を育てるというのは、どのようなことなのでしょうか?この静かに進行するトークの中で、作家のアンドリュー・ソロモンは何十組もの親たちとの対話を通して学んだことを語ります。無条件の愛と無条件の受容とは何が異なるのでしょうか?

Andrew Solomon - Writer
Andrew Solomon writes about politics, culture and psychology. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
"Even in purely non-religious terms,
「宗教的なことは一切 抜きにしても
00:12
homosexuality represents a misuse of the sexual faculty.
ホモセクシャルは性的機能の
誤用と言わざるを得ない
00:16
It is a pathetic little second-rate substitute for reality --
それは救いようのない
低俗な現実の代用品であり
00:22
a pitiable flight from life.
人生からの哀れむべき逃避である
00:27
As such, it deserves no compassion,
それ自体 同情には値せず
00:29
it deserves no treatment
マイノリティの苦難として
00:33
as minority martyrdom,
治療にも値しない
00:35
and it deserves not to be deemed anything but a pernicious sickness."
不治の病と見なすより他にない」
00:38
That's from Time magazine in 1966, when I was three years old.
これは1966年 私が3歳の時に発行された
TIME誌からの引用です
00:45
And last year, the president of the United States
そして昨年 アメリカ合衆国大統領は
00:50
came out in favor of gay marriage.
同性婚に好意的な態度を表明しました
00:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
00:57
And my question is, how did we get from there to here?
ここまでの道程は
どんなものだったのでしょう
01:04
How did an illness become an identity?
いかにして「病」は
アイデンティティになったのでしょう
01:10
When I was perhaps six years old,
私が6歳ぐらいだった時のことです
01:14
I went to a shoe store with my mother and my brother.
母と弟と一緒に 靴屋へ行きました
01:17
And at the end of buying our shoes,
靴を買った後
01:20
the salesman said to us that we could each have a balloon to take home.
お店の人が風船をくれると言いました
01:23
My brother wanted a red balloon, and I wanted a pink balloon.
弟は赤い風船を
私はピンクの風船を希望しました
01:27
My mother said that she thought I'd really rather have a blue balloon.
母は私に「本当は青がいいんでしょ?」
と言いました
01:32
But I said that I definitely wanted the pink one.
でも私は絶対に
ピンクが良かったのです
01:37
And she reminded me that my favorite color was blue.
母は 「青色が好きだったでしょう」と
念押ししました
01:40
The fact that my favorite color now is blue, but I'm still gay --
現在の私は青が好きですが
相変わらずゲイですから―
01:46
(Laughter) --
(笑)
01:50
is evidence of both my mother's influence and its limits.
これは母親の影響力と その限界を
同時に証明している訳です
01:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:58
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:00
When I was little, my mother used to say,
小さい頃 母はよく言っていました
02:07
"The love you have for your children is like no other feeling in the world.
「子供に対する親の愛情は
他のどんな感情にも代えがたいものよ
02:09
And until you have children, you don't know what it's like."
子供を持ってみないと
わからないけどね」
02:14
And when I was little, I took it as the greatest compliment in the world
私たち兄弟を育てることを
そんなふうに言ってくれる―
02:17
that she would say that about parenting my brother and me.
幼い私にとって
母の言葉は最大の賛辞でした
02:21
And when I was an adolescent, I thought
思春期になり 私は自分がゲイで
02:23
that I'm gay, and so I probably can't have a family.
おそらく家族を持つことはないと
思うようになりました
02:26
And when she said it, it made me anxious.
すると母の言葉は
私を不安にさせました
02:29
And after I came out of the closet,
カミングアウト後も
02:32
when she continued to say it, it made me furious.
母は例のセリフを言い続け
私は怒りを覚えました
02:33
I said, "I'm gay. That's not the direction that I'm headed in.
「僕はゲイだから
その方向へは進まない」
02:36
And I want you to stop saying that."
「もう言わないでくれ」と言いました
02:41
About 20 years ago, I was asked by my editors at The New York Times Magazine
20年ほど前 私はニューヨーク・
タイムズ・マガジンの編集者から
02:46
to write a piece about deaf culture.
ろう文化についての記事を
依頼されました
02:51
And I was rather taken aback.
かなり戸惑いました
02:54
I had thought of deafness entirely as an illness.
「ろう」を全くの疾患と思っていたのです
02:56
Those poor people, they couldn't hear.
耳の聞こえない 気の毒な人々
02:58
They lacked hearing, and what could we do for them?
聴覚のない彼らのために
何ができるのか?
03:00
And then I went out into the deaf world.
やがて私は ろうの世界に入り
03:02
I went to deaf clubs.
ろう者のクラブに行きました
03:04
I saw performances of deaf theater and of deaf poetry.
ろう者の演劇や手話詩を
見に行きました
03:07
I even went to the Miss Deaf America contest in Nashville, Tennessee
テネシー州ナッシュビルで開催された
ろう者のミスコンにも行ったのですが
03:11
where people complained about that slurry Southern signing.
そこでは皆「南部の手話は訛っている」
と文句を言っていました
03:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:21
And as I plunged deeper and deeper into the deaf world,
ろう者の世界に どんどん深く
はまって行き
03:25
I become convinced that deafness was a culture
私は ろう が文化であると
確信しました
03:29
and that the people in the deaf world who said,
ろう者たちの
「我々は聴覚がないんじゃない
03:32
"We don't lack hearing, we have membership in a culture,"
この文化を担う
権利を持ってるんだ」という言葉に
03:34
were saying something that was viable.
たくましさを感じました
03:38
It wasn't my culture,
私は部外者でしたし
03:40
and I didn't particularly want to rush off and join it,
その文化に殊更
入りたいとも思っていませんでしたが
03:42
but I appreciated that it was a culture
私はそれが一つの文化であり
03:45
and that for the people who were members of it,
その文化のメンバーたちにとっては
03:47
it felt as valuable as Latino culture or gay culture or Jewish culture.
ラテン文化やゲイ文化 ユダヤ文化と同様
価値のあるものなんだと感じました
03:50
It felt as valid perhaps even as American culture.
仮に アメリカ文化と比べても
引けを取らないでしょう
03:56
Then a friend of a friend of mine had a daughter who was a dwarf.
同じ頃 友達の友達に
小人症の娘が生まれました
04:01
And when her daughter was born,
娘が生まれると同時に
04:04
she suddenly found herself confronting questions
母親の目の前には
疑問が立ちはだかりました
04:06
that now began to seem quite resonant to me.
それは今の私には
とても共感できることです
04:08
She was facing the question of what to do with this child.
「この子と どう向き合えばいいのか?」
という疑問です
04:11
Should she say, "You're just like everyone else but a little bit shorter?"
「あなたは ちょっと小さいけど
他の皆と同じなのよ」と言うのか?
04:15
Or should she try to construct some kind of dwarf identity,
それとも 小人としての
アイデンティティの確立を目指し
04:18
get involved in the Little People of America,
Little People of America に参加して
04:21
become aware of what was happening for dwarfs?
小人症の現状に目を向けるべきか?
04:24
And I suddenly thought,
私は突然 思いつきました
04:27
most deaf children are born to hearing parents.
ろうの子の殆どは
健常の親の元に生まれます
04:28
Those hearing parents tend to try to cure them.
親たちは「治療」を考えがちですが
04:31
Those deaf people discover community somehow in adolescence.
子供は思春期になると
ろうのコミュニティを発見するものです
04:33
Most gay people are born to straight parents.
同性愛者の殆どは
ストレートの親の元に生まれます
04:37
Those straight parents often want them to function
ストレートの親は大抵
自分たちの考える「普通」の世界で
04:40
in what they think of as the mainstream world,
生きていけるようになってほしい
と望みますが
04:42
and those gay people have to discover identity later on.
同性愛者は自らのアイデンティティを
いずれ発見することになります
04:45
And here was this friend of mine
いま私の友人が直面しているのは
04:48
looking at these questions of identity with her dwarf daughter.
小人症の娘の
アイデンティティの問題です
04:50
And I thought, there it is again:
同じだと思いました
04:53
A family that perceives itself to be normal
どこか普通でない子を持ちながらも
04:55
with a child who seems to be extraordinary.
そのことを普通だと捉えている家族
04:57
And I hatched the idea that there are really two kinds of identity.
私はアイデンティティには
2種類あると考えるようになりました
05:00
There are vertical identities,
1つは「縦」のアイデンティティ
05:04
which are passed down generationally from parent to child.
これは親から子へ
受け継がれていくもので
05:06
Those are things like ethnicity, frequently nationality, language, often religion.
民族性や 多くの場合
国民性 言語や宗教などのことです
05:09
Those are things you have in common with your parents and with your children.
これらは親子間で
共有されるアイデンティティです
05:15
And while some of them can be difficult,
中には厳しいものもありますが
05:19
there's no attempt to cure them.
誰もそれを「治療」しようとはしません
05:22
You can argue that it's harder in the United States --
現大統領が有色とはいえ
やはりアメリカ合衆国において
05:24
our current presidency notwithstanding --
有色人種であることは
05:27
to be a person of color.
困難を伴うと言えるでしょう
05:29
And yet, we have nobody who is trying to ensure
だからと言って アフリカ系アメリカ人や
05:31
that the next generation of children born to African-Americans and Asians
アジア人の間に生まれる
次世代の子供たちの肌をクリーム色に
05:34
come out with creamy skin and yellow hair.
髪を黄色にしてやろうと思う人は
どこにもいません
05:38
There are these other identities which you have to learn from a peer group.
これとは別に仲間から学ぶ
アイデンティティがあります
05:41
And I call them horizontal identities,
仲間というのは
横に広がる感覚ですから
05:45
because the peer group is the horizontal experience.
私はこれを
「横」のアイデンティティと呼びます
05:48
These are identities that are alien to your parents
このアイデンティティについて
親は門外漢ですから
05:50
and that you have to discover when you get to see them in peers.
仲間との関わりから
見つけるしかないのです
05:53
And those identities, those horizontal identities,
このような横のアイデンティティは
05:57
people have almost always tried to cure.
ほとんどの場合
「治療」の対象にされます
06:00
And I wanted to look at what the process is
私はこうしたアイデンティティを
持つ人々が
06:04
through which people who have those identities
それらと上手く
付き合えるようになるまでの
06:07
come to a good relationship with them.
過程を調べたいと考えました
06:09
And it seemed to me that there were three levels of acceptance
どうやら その過程では
もれなく3段階の受容が
06:12
that needed to take place.
生じるようでした
06:16
There's self-acceptance, there's family acceptance, and there's social acceptance.
それは 自己による受容 家族による受容
そして社会による受容です
06:17
And they don't always coincide.
同時に起きるとは限りません
06:23
And a lot of the time, people who have these conditions are very angry
こうした状況にある人は大抵
怒りに満ちています
06:25
because they feel as though their parents don't love them,
彼らが親に愛されていないと
感じているためですが
06:29
when what actually has happened is that their parents don't accept them.
実は親は
彼らを受容できていないだけなのです
06:32
Love is something that ideally is there unconditionally
愛は 理想的に言えば
06:36
throughout the relationship between a parent and a child.
親子の間で 常に
無条件に存在するものです
06:39
But acceptance is something that takes time.
しかし受容には時間がかかります
06:43
It always takes time.
時間がかかるものなのです
06:46
One of the dwarfs I got to know was a guy named Clinton Brown.
知り合いの小人症の男性に
クリントン・ブラウンという人がいました
06:48
When he was born, he was diagnosed with diastrophic dwarfism,
彼は生まれた時に
変形性小人症で―
06:53
a very disabling condition,
重度の障害と診断されました
06:56
and his parents were told that he would never walk, he would never talk,
両親は こう告げられました
彼は歩くことも話すこともできず
06:58
he would have no intellectual capacity,
知能も持たず
07:02
and he would probably not even recognize them.
おそらく親を認識することすら
ないだろうと
07:03
And it was suggested to them that they leave him at the hospital
そして彼が静かに息を引き取れるよう
07:06
so that he could die there quietly.
病院に置いていくことを
勧められました
07:10
And his mother said she wasn't going to do it.
ところが彼の母は きっぱり断り
07:12
And she took her son home.
彼を家に連れて帰ったのです
07:14
And even though she didn't have a lot of educational or financial advantages,
教育の面でも経済的にも
余裕はありませんでしたが
07:16
she found the best doctor in the country
変形小人症に立ち向かうために
07:19
for dealing with diastrophic dwarfism,
母親は
国内で最高の医者を見つけ出し
07:21
and she got Clinton enrolled with him.
クリントンを そこへ入院させました
07:23
And in the course of his childhood,
彼は幼少期のうちに
07:25
he had 30 major surgical procedures.
30回の大手術を受けました
07:28
And he spent all this time stuck in the hospital
彼はその間のすべての時間を
07:31
while he was having those procedures,
病院で過ごしましたが
07:33
as a result of which he now can walk.
おかげで歩けるようになりました
07:35
And while he was there, they sent tutors around to help him with his school work.
入院中も学校の勉強ができるように
親は家庭教師を雇いました
07:37
And he worked very hard because there was nothing else to do.
他にすることもないので
彼は一生懸命勉強しました
07:41
And he ended up achieving at a level
そして ついに彼は
07:44
that had never before been contemplated by any member of his family.
家族の誰もが予期しなかった程の
レベルに到達したのです
07:46
He was the first one in his family, in fact, to go to college,
彼は家族の中で大学に進んだ
第1号となり
07:49
where he lived on campus and drove a specially-fitted car
キャンパスに住み
彼の特別な体に合わせた―
07:53
that accommodated his unusual body.
特別装備の車を運転しました
07:56
And his mother told me this story of coming home one day --
彼の母がこんな話をしてくれました
ある日の帰宅途中のこと
07:59
and he went to college nearby --
彼の大学は近所にあるのですが
08:02
and she said, "I saw that car, which you can always recognize,
「あの子の車は
見たらすぐにわかるでしょ
08:04
in the parking lot of a bar," she said. (Laughter)
それがバーの駐車場にあったのよ」
(笑)
08:07
"And I thought to myself, they're six feet tall, he's three feet tall.
「他の人たちは身長180センチ
彼は90センチだから
08:11
Two beers for them is four beers for him."
2杯のビールは
彼には4杯分ってことよ」
08:16
She said, "I knew I couldn't go in there and interrupt him,
「そこへ割り込んで行くわけにも
いかないし
08:18
but I went home, and I left him eight messages on his cell phone."
家に帰って 彼の携帯に
8回も留守電を入れちゃった」
08:21
She said, "And then I thought,
「その時 思ったの
08:25
if someone had said to me when he was born
彼が生まれた時に
『いずれは大学の仲間と車で飲みに行って
08:26
that my future worry would be that he'd go drinking and driving with his college buddies -- "
心配させられることになるよ』
なんて言う人がいたかしら」
08:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:34
And I said to her, "What do you think you did
彼女に尋ねました
「彼がここまで魅力的で―
08:43
that helped him to emerge as this charming, accomplished, wonderful person?"
優秀で素晴らしい人間になったのは
あなたが何をしたからでしょう?」
08:45
And she said, "What did I do? I loved him, that's all.
彼女は言いました「私が何をしたか?
私は彼を愛してた ただそれだけよ
08:49
Clinton just always had that light in him.
クリントンは輝く素質のある子でした
08:54
And his father and I were lucky enough to be the first to see it there."
夫と私はそれを誰よりも先に見られて
幸運でした」
08:57
I'm going to quote from another magazine of the '60s.
ここでまた60年代の別の雑誌から
引用を紹介します
09:04
This one is from 1968 -- The Atlantic Monthly, voice of liberal America --
1968年のアトランティック誌からです
自由主義アメリカの声として
09:07
written by an important bioethicist.
ある生命倫理学の重鎮が書きました
09:12
He said, "There is no reason to feel guilty
「ダウン症の子供を捨てたとしても
09:15
about putting a Down syndrome child away,
何ら罪を感じる必要はない
09:19
whether it is put away in the sense of hidden in a sanitarium
施設に こっそり捨てようと
09:22
or in a more responsible, lethal sense.
もっと責任を問われるような
命に関わる捨て方だろうと
09:27
It is sad, yes -- dreadful. But it carries no guilt.
それは悲しく厭な事ではあるが
罪を伴うことではない
09:31
True guilt arises only from an offense against a person,
罪とは 人間に対して犯すものに
限られるが
09:36
and a Down's is not a person."
ダウン症は人間ではない」
09:40
There's been a lot of ink given to the enormous progress that we've made
ゲイに対する待遇が
大きく進展したことについては
09:45
in the treatment of gay people.
多くの言説が公になっています
09:49
The fact that our attitude has changed is in the headlines every day.
ゲイに対する態度が変化したことを
日々マスコミが取り上げています
09:51
But we forget how we used to see people who had other differences,
ところが私たちは他の違いを持つ人々を
過去にどういう目で見ていたか
09:55
how we used to see people who were disabled,
障害者を どう見ていたのか
10:00
how inhuman we held people to be.
人々をいかに残酷な生き物にしてきたか
忘れていました
10:02
And the change that's been accomplished there,
今日達成された変化は
10:05
which is almost equally radical,
ゲイと同程度に急進的ですが
10:07
is one that we pay not very much attention to.
私たちは十分に注意を
払ってきませんでした
10:08
One of the families I interviewed, Tom and Karen Robards,
私が取材した家族の中に
トム&カレン・ロバーズがいます
10:11
were taken aback when, as young and successful New Yorkers,
若くして成功したニューヨーカーである
夫妻は非常に驚きました
10:15
their first child was diagnosed with Down syndrome.
初めての子供がダウン症と
診断されたのです
10:19
They thought the educational opportunities for him were not what they should be,
夫妻は息子に用意された教育が
適切なものではないと考え
10:22
and so they decided they would build a little center --
自らの手で小さな教育センターを
作る決意をしました
10:27
two classrooms that they started with a few other parents --
他の親たちと一緒に2つの教室を作り
10:30
to educate kids with D.S.
ダウン症の子の教育を始めました
10:34
And over the years, that center grew into something called the Cooke Center,
やがて拡大し「クック・センター」と
呼ばれるまでになり
10:36
where there are now thousands upon thousands
今や何千もの知的障害を持つ子たちが
10:40
of children with intellectual disabilities who are being taught.
そこで教育を受けています
10:43
In the time since that Atlantic Monthly story ran,
例のアトランティック誌の記事掲載から
今日までに
10:46
the life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has tripled.
ダウン症の人々の平均余命は
3倍になりました
10:49
The experience of Down syndrome people includes those who are actors,
ダウン症の人々の中には 役者になったり
10:54
those who are writers, some who are able to live fully independently in adulthood.
作家になったり 完全に独立した成人として
生活できている人もいます
10:58
The Robards had a lot to do with that.
ロバーズ夫妻の功績です
11:04
And I said, "Do you regret it?
夫妻に尋ねました
「悔いはありますか?」
11:06
Do you wish your child didn't have Down syndrome?
「我が子がダウン症でなかったらと
思いますか?
11:08
Do you wish you'd never heard of it?"
ダウン症と縁のない人生を
望みますか?」
11:10
And interestingly his father said,
父親の答えは興味深いものでした
11:12
"Well, for David, our son, I regret it,
「息子のデビッドに関しては
悔いがあります
11:15
because for David, it's a difficult way to be in the world,
デビッドにとっては
生き辛くさせていますからね
11:17
and I'd like to give David an easier life.
息子には もっと楽な生き方を
させてあげたかった
11:21
But I think if we lost everyone with Down syndrome, it would be a catastrophic loss."
でも もしダウン症の子を皆 失ったら
それは とてつもない損失です」
11:23
And Karen Robards said to me, "I'm with Tom.
カレン・ロバーズは言いました
「私もトムと同じです
11:28
For David, I would cure it in an instant to give him an easier life.
息子に関しては すぐにでも治して
もっと楽に生きられるようにしてあげたい
11:32
But speaking for myself -- well, I would never have believed 23 years ago when he was born
だけど 自分に関して言えば
デビッドが生まれた23年前には
11:36
that I could come to such a point --
考えられなかったことだけど
11:41
speaking for myself, it's made me so much better and so much kinder
私自身は ダウン症と関わって
ずっと親切で良い人間になれたし
11:43
and so much more purposeful in my whole life,
はっきり目的を持って
生きられるようになったわ
11:48
that speaking for myself, I wouldn't give it up for anything in the world."
だから私に関して言えば
悔いは何一つありません」
11:51
We live at a point when social acceptance for these and many other conditions
ダウン症を含む様々な障害が
確実に社会で受容される時代に
11:57
is on the up and up.
私たちは生きています
12:01
And yet we also live at the moment
そして同時に この時代は
12:03
when our ability to eliminate those conditions
その障害を取り除くための
我々の能力も
12:05
has reached a height we never imagined before.
かつて想像できなかった程の
レベルに達しています
12:08
Most deaf infants born in the United States now
今日 アメリカで ろうで生まれた子の
ほとんどは
12:11
will receive Cochlear implants,
人工内耳の手術が受けられます
12:14
which are put into the brain and connected to a receiver,
人工内耳を脳に埋め込み
受信機と接続することで
12:16
and which allow them to acquire a facsimile of hearing and to use oral speech.
彼らは電送によって聞き
発語できるようになります
12:20
A compound that has been tested in mice, BMN-111,
すでにマウス実験を終えた
BMN-111という治験薬は
12:25
is useful in preventing the action of the achondroplasia gene.
軟骨発育不全症の遺伝子の作用を
防ぐのに効果があります
12:30
Achondroplasia is the most common form of dwarfism,
軟骨発育不全は小人症の原因として
最も多いものですが
12:35
and mice who have been given that substance and who have the achondroplasia gene,
軟骨発育不全の遺伝子を持つマウスに
その薬を与えると
12:37
grow to full size.
通常のサイズに成長します
12:41
Testing in humans is around the corner.
人間への臨床試験まで
あと少しです
12:43
There are blood tests which are making progress
ダウン症の胎児をより正確に
12:46
that would pick up Down syndrome more clearly and earlier in pregnancies than ever before,
かつてないほど早い段階で判定できる
血液検査も進歩しています
12:48
making it easier and easier for people to eliminate those pregnancies,
これにより妊娠中絶を望む場合には
より簡単に
12:54
or to terminate them.
できるようになります
12:59
And so we have both social progress and medical progress.
このように社会的にも医学的にも
進歩があります
13:00
And I believe in both of them.
私はどちらも大切なことだと思います
13:05
I believe the social progress is fantastic and meaningful and wonderful,
社会的な進歩は素敵なことですし
有意義で素晴らしいと思います
13:07
and I think the same thing about the medical progress.
医学的な進歩も同様に
素晴らしいと考えています
13:11
But I think it's a tragedy when one of them doesn't see the other.
しかし 双方の思惑がすれ違っていては
悲劇です
13:14
And when I see the way they're intersecting
私が挙げた3つの障害を取り巻く環境で
13:18
in conditions like the three I've just described,
2つの進歩が交差する様子は
13:20
I sometimes think it's like those moments in grand opera
まるでグランド・オペラの一幕のようだと
思うことがあります
13:23
when the hero realizes he loves the heroine
主人公がヒロインを愛していると悟った
まさにその時
13:26
at the exact moment that she lies expiring on a divan.
ヒロインは横たわり息を引き取るという
あの場面です
13:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:33
We have to think about how we feel about cures altogether.
私たちは 治療に対する感情について
一緒に考えなくてはなりません
13:36
And a lot of the time the question of parenthood is,
親の立場から
いつも問題となるのは
13:40
what do we validate in our children,
自分たちの子供の何に
価値を見出すのか
13:43
and what do we cure in them?
子供の何を治すのかということです
13:45
Jim Sinclair, a prominent autism activist, said,
ジム・シンクレアという有名な
自閉症の活動家がこう言っています
13:46
"When parents say 'I wish my child did not have autism,'
「親が 『うちの子に自閉症がなければ
良かったのに』と言ったら それは
13:51
what they're really saying is 'I wish the child I have did not exist
『この子が生まれてこなかったら
良かったのに そして代わりに―
13:55
and I had a different, non-autistic child instead.'
自閉症でない子供がほしかった』と
言っているのと同じです」
14:00
Read that again. This is what we hear when you mourn over our existence.
「よく考えてください 私たちの存在を
嘆いているように聞こえるのですよ
14:04
This is what we hear when you pray for a cure --
あなた方が私たちの治癒を願う時
私たちは こう感じています
14:09
that your fondest wish for us
あなた方の一番の願いは
14:12
is that someday we will cease to be
私たちの存在がなくなり
その中身だけが
14:14
and strangers you can love will move in behind our faces."
あなた方の愛せる知らない誰かと
こっそり入れ替わることなのだと」
14:16
It's a very extreme point of view,
これは非常に極端な物の見方ですが
14:22
but it points to the reality that people engage with the life they have
障害を持つ人々が人生で直面している
現実を示しています
14:25
and they don't want to be cured or changed or eliminated.
彼らは治癒も変化も
障害の除去も 望んではいないのです
14:29
They want to be whoever it is that they've come to be.
どんな境遇であれ
彼らは自分のままでありたいのです
14:34
One of the families I interviewed for this project
このプロジェクトのために
インタビューした家族の中に
14:37
was the family of Dylan Klebold who was one of the perpetrators of the Columbine massacre.
コロンバイン高校の虐殺犯の一人
ディラン・クレボルドの家族がいました
14:41
It took a long time to persuade them to talk to me,
話してくれるよう説得するには
長い時間がかかりましたが
14:46
and once they agreed, they were so full of their story
一旦了解すると 彼らからは
様々な話が溢れ出し
14:49
that they couldn't stop telling it.
止めどもなく 語ってくれました
14:51
And the first weekend I spent with them -- the first of many --
週末ごとに何度も 彼らに会いましたが
14:53
I recorded more than 20 hours of conversation.
その初回だけでも
20時間以上の会話を録音しました
14:56
And on Sunday night, we were all exhausted.
日曜の夜には全員 疲れ果てていました
14:59
We were sitting in the kitchen. Sue Klebold was fixing dinner.
私たちは台所に座り スー・クレボルドは
晩御飯の支度中でした
15:01
And I said, "If Dylan were here now,
私は尋ねました
「もしディランが今ここに居たら
15:04
do you have a sense of what you'd want to ask him?"
彼に何か聞きたいという気持ちは
ありますか?」
15:07
And his father said, "I sure do.
父親はこう答えました
「もちろんです
15:09
I'd want to ask him what the hell he thought he was doing."
どういうつもりで あんな事をしでかしたか
聞いてやりたいです」
15:12
And Sue looked at the floor, and she thought for a minute.
スーは床を見つめて
しばらく考えていました
15:15
And then she looked back up and said,
顔を上げると 彼女はこう言いました
15:19
"I would ask him to forgive me for being his mother
「私は母親でありながら
彼の内面で何が起きているのか
15:21
and never knowing what was going on inside his head."
分かってあげられなかったことを
許してと言いたいわ」
15:25
When I had dinner with her a couple of years later --
数年後 彼女と夕食を
とっていた時のことです
15:30
one of many dinners that we had together --
何度も ご一緒したうちの一回です
15:33
she said, "You know, when it first happened,
彼女は言いました
「あの事件があった時
15:35
I used to wish that I had never married, that I had never had children.
私は結婚して子供を持ったことを
とても悔やんでいたわ
15:38
If I hadn't gone to Ohio State and crossed paths with Tom,
もし私がオハイオ州立大に行かず
トムと出会わなければ
15:42
this child wouldn't have existed and this terrible thing wouldn't have happened.
あの子は生まれてこなかったし
あの悲惨な事件も起きなかったでしょう
15:45
But I've come to feel that I love the children I had so much
でも ようやく私は子供たちを
とても愛していたと思えるようになったの
15:49
that I don't want to imagine a life without them.
子供たち抜きの人生なんて
想像できないわ
15:53
I recognize the pain they caused to others, for which there can be no forgiveness,
あの子達が他の人に与えた苦しみは
決して許されるものではありません
15:57
but the pain they caused to me, there is," she said.
でも 私の苦しみに限っては
許してやろうと思うの」
16:02
"So while I recognize that it would have been better for the world
「だから もしディランが
生まれてこなかったとしたら
16:05
if Dylan had never been born,
世の中にとって良かったとは思うけど
16:09
I've decided that it would not have been better for me."
私にとっては そうではなかったと
思うことに決めたの」
16:11
I thought it was surprising how all of these families had all of these children with all of these problems,
驚くべきことだと思いました
様々な問題のある子供を持つ家族は皆
16:17
problems that they mostly would have done anything to avoid,
大抵 その問題を何とか回避しようとし
16:23
and that they had all found so much meaning in that experience of parenting.
そこで親として経験したことに
とても大きな意義を見出しているのです
16:26
And then I thought, all of us who have children
そして私は 子供を持つ全ての親は
16:30
love the children we have, with their flaws.
その欠陥も含めて我が子を
愛しているのだと思いました
16:33
If some glorious angel suddenly descended through my living room ceiling
もしも突然 美しい天使が
リビングの天井から舞い降りて来て
16:36
and offered to take away the children I have
私の子供を取り上げる代わりに
16:40
and give me other, better children -- more polite, funnier, nicer, smarter --
もっと良い子供― 礼儀正しくて 愉快で
素直で 賢い子供をあげると言われたら
16:43
I would cling to the children I have and pray away that atrocious spectacle.
私は我が子に しがみついて
その最悪な状況が過ぎ去るよう祈るでしょう
16:49
And ultimately I feel
こうした感情は 結局のところ
16:54
that in the same way that we test flame-retardant pajamas in an inferno
我が子がストーブに手を伸ばした時
火がつかないように
16:56
to ensure they won't catch fire when our child reaches across the stove,
燃えないパジャマを
念のため火にくべてみるのと同じです
17:00
so these stories of families negotiating these extreme differences
乗り越えてきた違いは極端でも
これらの家族のストーリーは
17:04
reflect on the universal experience of parenting,
万国共通の親心の表れであって
17:08
which is always that sometimes you look at your child and you think,
親が子供の顔を見て ふと思う
あの感慨と同じです
17:11
where did you come from?
「あなたはどこから来たの?」
17:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:17
It turns out that while each of these individual differences is siloed --
それぞれの違いは個別で
それ自体に関連性はありませんから
17:20
there are only so many families dealing with schizophrenia,
ある家族は統合失調症に取り組み
17:25
there are only so many families of children who are transgender,
ある家族はトランスジェンダーの子を持つ
という具合ですが
17:27
there are only so many families of prodigies --
天才児を抱えた家族にしても
17:30
who also face similar challenges in many ways --
直面する困難としては よく似ています
17:32
there are only so many families in each of those categories --
各カテゴリーに分類される家族の
数は限られるものの
17:35
but if you start to think
家族の間で生じた違いに―
17:37
that the experience of negotiating difference within your family
折り合いをつけていく経験を
他の人々も取り組んでいるのだと
17:39
is what people are addressing,
考えるようにすれば
17:42
then you discover that it's a nearly universal phenomenon.
それが ごく一般的な現象であることに
気づくでしょう
17:44
Ironically, it turns out, that it's our differences, and our negotiation of difference,
皮肉なことですが 違いがあり
その違いに折り合いをつけていくからこそ
17:48
that unite us.
私たちの間に 結びつきが生まれるのです
17:53
I decided to have children while I was working on this project.
このプロジェクトに取り組みながら 私は
自分も子供を持つことを決心しました
17:55
And many people were astonished and said,
多くの人たちは驚いて こう言いました
18:00
"But how can you decide to have children
「子育ての大変さを調査している最中に
18:03
in the midst of studying everything that can go wrong?"
よく子供を持とうと思ったね」
18:05
And I said, "I'm not studying everything that can go wrong.
こう返しました 「私は大変さを
調査しているんじゃないですよ
18:09
What I'm studying is how much love there can be,
私が調査しているのは
ものすごく大変そうな中に
18:13
even when everything appears to be going wrong."
いかに たくさんの愛が存在しているか
ということです」
18:16
I thought a lot about the mother of one disabled child I had seen,
私は障害児を持った ある母親のことを
よく考えました
18:20
a severely disabled child who died through caregiver neglect.
その子は重度の障害児で
介護者のネグレクトによって亡くなりました
18:26
And when his ashes were interred, his mother said,
遺灰を埋める時 母親はこう言いました
18:30
"I pray here for forgiveness for having been twice robbed,
「2度に渡って奪われた罪を
お赦しいただきたく 祈ります
18:33
once of the child I wanted and once of the son I loved."
一度は私が望んだ子
そして もう一度は私が愛した子を」
18:41
And I figured it was possible then for anyone to love any child
それを聞き私は 強い意志さえあれば
どんな人でも どんな子でも
18:47
if they had the effective will to do so.
愛することが可能なのだと気づきました
18:51
So my husband is the biological father of two children
私の夫には ミネアポリスに住む
レズビアンの友人との間に
18:54
with some lesbian friends in Minneapolis.
血のつながった子が2人います
18:59
I had a close friend from college who'd gone through a divorce and wanted to have children.
私には 大学からの親友で 離婚を経て
子供が欲しくなった女性がいて
19:02
And so she and I have a daughter,
彼女と私の間に娘がいます
19:08
and mother and daughter live in Texas.
彼女と娘はテキサスで暮らしています
19:09
And my husband and I have a son who lives with us all the time
夫と私にはずっと一緒に暮らしている
息子がいますが
19:12
of whom I am the biological father,
息子と私は血がつながっています
19:15
and our surrogate for the pregnancy was Laura,
代理母になってくれたのはローラという
ミネアポリスに住むレズビアンで
19:17
the lesbian mother of Oliver and Lucy in Minneapolis.
彼女にはオリバーとルーシーという
子供がいます
19:21
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:24
So the shorthand is five parents of four children in three states.
要約すると 3つの州に
4人の子供の親が5人いるわけです
19:33
And there are people who think that the existence of my family
こんな家族が存在すると
自分たちの家族が傷つけられたり
19:38
somehow undermines or weakens or damages their family.
弱体化させられたり 害を与えられると
考える人々がいます
19:42
And there are people who think that families like mine
私の家族のようなものの存在は
許されるべきでないと
19:46
shouldn't be allowed to exist.
考える人々もいます
19:50
And I don't accept subtractive models of love, only additive ones.
私は 引き算の愛は認めません
認めるのは足し算の愛のみです
19:52
And I believe that in the same way that we need species diversity
この星が確実に存続していくために
19:57
to ensure that the planet can go on,
種の多様性が必要なように
20:01
so we need this diversity of affection and diversity of family
優しさの生態圏を強化するために
20:03
in order to strengthen the ecosphere of kindness.
私たちには愛情の多様性と
家族の多様性が必要なのです
20:07
The day after our son was born,
息子が生まれた翌日
20:12
the pediatrician came into the hospital room and said she was concerned.
小児科医が病室に入ってきて
気になることがあると言いました
20:14
He wasn't extending his legs appropriately.
息子の足の伸ばし方が
おかしいと言うのです
20:19
She said that might mean that he had brain damage.
脳に障害があるかもしれないと
いうことでした
20:22
In so far as he was extending them, he was doing so asymmetrically,
確かに彼の足の伸ばし方は
左右対称ではなく
20:25
which she thought could mean that there was a tumor of some kind in action.
それで医者は何らかの腫瘍のせい
ではないかと考えたのです
20:28
And he had a very large head, which she thought might indicate hydrocephalus.
更に彼は頭がとても大きく 医者は
水頭症の兆候かもしれないと考えました
20:32
And as she told me all of these things,
医者の説明を聞いて
20:37
I felt the very center of my being pouring out onto the floor.
私は 自分の中心が 床の上に
溢れ出すような感覚を覚えました
20:39
And I thought, here I had been working for years
それまでの仕事で 私は
20:43
on a book about how much meaning people had found
障害児を育てる経験を通して
20:45
in the experience of parenting children who are disabled,
人々が感得する意義について
執筆していながら
20:48
and I didn't want to join their number.
自分は仲間に入りたくないと思いました
20:51
Because what I was encountering was an idea of illness.
私が直面していたのは
病気という観念だったからです
20:55
And like all parents since the dawn of time,
歴史開闢以来 どの親もそうであるように
20:58
I wanted to protect my child from illness.
私は我が子を
病気から守りたいと思いました
21:00
And I wanted also to protect myself from illness.
私自身も病気から
身を守りたいと思いました
21:03
And yet, I knew from the work I had done
同時に 私は自分の仕事を通じて
21:06
that if he had any of the things we were about to start testing for,
これから検査をして 息子に何らかの
問題があったとしても
21:09
that those would ultimately be his identity,
結局はそれが この子の
アイデンティティとなり
21:13
and if they were his identity they would become my identity,
だとすれば それは
私のアイデンティティにもなるのだと
21:16
that that illness was going to take a very different shape as it unfolded.
その病気はこの先 大きく形を
変えていくのだと 知っていました
21:20
We took him to the MRI machine, we took him to the CAT scanner,
私たちは息子を MRI や CT にかけ
21:25
we took this day-old child and gave him over for an arterial blood draw.
生後1日の我が子に
動脈血の検査を受けさせました
21:28
We felt helpless.
無力感を味わいました
21:32
And at the end of five hours,
そして5時間が経過した後
21:33
they said that his brain was completely clear
医者たちは彼の脳には何の問題もなく
21:34
and that he was by then extending his legs correctly.
足の伸ばし方も良くなったと言いました
21:37
And when I asked the pediatrician what had been going on,
私が小児科医に何が起きたのか尋ねると
21:40
she said she thought in the morning he had probably had a cramp.
こんな答えでした
「朝 痙攣を起こしたせいかしらね」
21:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:47
But I thought how my mother was right.
それにしても 私は母の言ったことは
正しかったと思いました
21:50
I thought, the love you have for your children
「子供に対する親の愛情は
21:58
is unlike any other feeling in the world,
他のどんな感情にも
代えがたいものであり
22:02
and until you have children, you don't know what it feels like.
子供を持ってみないと わからない」
本当にそうだと思いました
22:05
I think children had ensnared me
私が父親になることと 失うことを
22:11
the moment I connected fatherhood with loss.
結びつけた その瞬間
私は子供たちに試されたのだと思います
22:13
But I'm not sure I would have noticed that
しかし 調査の真っ最中でなかったら
22:17
if I hadn't been so in the thick of this research project of mine.
私はそのことに気づけたかどうか
分かりません
22:19
I'd encountered so much strange love,
私はたくさんの
不思議な愛の形を見てきました
22:24
and I fell very naturally into its bewitching patterns.
そして私はその魅惑的なパターンに
自然と はまりこんでいきました
22:28
And I saw how splendor can illuminate even the most abject vulnerabilities.
そして どんなに救いがたい弱さにも
光は当たるのだということを見てきました
22:31
During these 10 years, I had witnessed and learned
この10年間で私が目撃し学んできたのは
22:38
the terrifying joy of unbearable responsibility,
耐え難いほどの重責がもたらす
身のすくむような喜びです
22:42
and I had come to see how it conquers everything else.
それは他の何物にも勝るということが
分かるようになりました
22:46
And while I had sometimes thought the parents I was interviewing were fools,
私はインタビューをしながら この親は
馬鹿だと思うことがありました
22:49
enslaving themselves to a lifetime's journey with their thankless children
感謝もしない子供のために一生を捧げ
人生を棒に振り
22:53
and trying to breed identity out of misery,
不幸の中からアイデンティティを
つむぎ出そうとするなんて
22:58
I realized that day that my research had built me a plank
しかし 私はあの日 気づいたのです
調査のおかげで私には素地ができており
23:01
and that I was ready to join them on their ship.
他の親たちと
運命を共にする覚悟があると
23:06
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
23:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
23:11
Translator:Seiryu Matsuura
Reviewer:Emi Kamiya

sponsored links

Andrew Solomon - Writer
Andrew Solomon writes about politics, culture and psychology.

Why you should listen

Andrew Solomon is a writer, lecturer and Professor of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University. He is president of PEN American Center. He writes regularly for The New Yorker and the New York Times.

Solomon's newest book, Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change, Seven Continents, Twenty-Five Years was published in April, 2016. His previous book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity won the National Book Critics Circle award for nonfiction, the Wellcome Prize and 22 other national awards. It tells the stories of parents who not only learn to deal with their exceptional children but also find profound meaning in doing so. It was a New York Times bestseller in both hardcover and paperback editions. Solomon's previous book, The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, won the 2001 National Book Award for Nonfiction, was a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize and was included in The Times of London's list of one hundred best books of the decade. It has been published in twenty-four languages. Solomon is also the author of the novel A Stone Boat and of The Irony Tower: Soviet Artists in a Time of Glasnost.

Solomon is an activist in LGBT rights, mental health, education and the arts. He is a member of the boards of directors of the National LGBTQ Force and Trans Youth Family Allies. He is a member of the Board of Visitors of Columbia University Medical Center, serves on the National Advisory Board of the Depression Center at the University of Michigan, is a director of Columbia Psychiatry and is a member of the Advisory Board of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. Solomon also serves on the boards of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Yaddo and The Alex Fund, which supports the education of Romani children. He is also a fellow of Berkeley College at Yale University and a member of the New York Institute for the Humanities and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Solomon lives with his husband and son in New York and London and is a dual national. He also has a daughter with a college friend; mother and daughter live in Texas but visit often.


The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.