10:32
TED@UPS

Regina Hartley: Why the best hire might not have the perfect resume

レジーナ・ハートリー: 最高の人材の履歴書が必ずしも理想的でない理由

Filmed:

完璧な履歴書を持つ候補者と、困難を戦い抜いてきた候補者のどちらかを選ぶことになったとき、人事部長のレジーナ・ハートリーは常に「闘士」にチャンスを与えると言います。自身逆境を生き抜いてきたハートリーは、最悪のところから這い上がってきた人には変化し続ける仕事環境を耐え抜ける力があると知っているからです。彼女はアドバイスします。「過小評価されている候補者に目を向けてください。彼らの秘密の武器はその情熱と目的意識です。闘士を採用しましょう」

- Human Resources Manager, UPS
Regina Hartley thinks that those who don't always look good on paper may be just the person you need to hire. Full bio

Your company launches
a search for an open position.
あなたの会社では空いたポストの
求人を始めました
00:12
The applications start rolling in,
応募が届き始め
00:16
and the qualified candidates
are identified.
適格な候補者が
何人か見つかりました
00:19
Now the choosing begins.
いよいよ選考の開始です
00:22
Person A: Ivy League,
4.0, flawless resume,
Aさんは 一流大卒で 成績優秀
完璧な履歴書に
00:25
great recommendations.
素晴らしい推薦文の数々
00:31
All the right stuff.
非の打ちどころがありません
00:33
Person B: state school,
fair amount of job hopping,
Bさんは 二流大卒で
転職歴多数
00:35
and odd jobs like cashier
and singing waitress.
レジ係や「歌うウェイトレス」みたいな
変な職歴があります
00:40
But remember -- both are qualified.
ただし どちらも適格だ
ということを忘れないでください
00:45
So I ask you:
さて お聞きしますが
00:49
who are you going to pick?
皆さんなら
どちらを採用しますか?
00:51
My colleagues and I created
very official terms
うちの部署では
この対照的なタイプの候補者を表す
00:53
to describe two distinct
categories of candidates.
正式な名称があります
00:57
We call A "the Silver Spoon,"
Aさんは「銀のスプーン」
01:01
the one who clearly had advantages
and was destined for success.
明白な優位性があり
成功を約束されているような人物です
01:05
And we call B "the Scrapper,"
Bさんは「闘士」
01:10
the one who had to fight
against tremendous odds
同じ地点に到達するために
01:13
to get to the same point.
極めて困難な条件を
戦い抜いてきた人物です
01:16
You just heard a human resources
director refer to people
皆さん 今
人事部長がとんでもない呼び名を
01:20
as Silver Spoons and Scrappers --
候補者に付けているのを
耳にしたわけで —
01:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:25
which is not exactly politically correct
and sounds a bit judgmental.
確かに政治的公正さを欠き
少し決めつけすぎに聞こえるかもしれません
01:26
But before my human resources
certification gets revoked --
私の人事資格が
はく奪される前に —
01:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:35
let me explain.
説明させてください
01:36
A resume tells a story.
履歴書はその人物の
ストーリーを語ります
01:38
And over the years, I've learned
something about people
長年の経験から
パッチワークキルトみたいな
01:41
whose experiences read
like a patchwork quilt,
履歴を持つ人について
学んだことがあり
01:44
that makes me stop and fully consider them
そういう履歴書を
すぐには放り出さず
01:47
before tossing their resumes away.
立ち止まって
よく検討するようになりました
01:51
A series of odd jobs may indicate
半端な仕事の連続は
01:54
inconsistency, lack of focus,
unpredictability.
一貫性の無さや 集中力の欠如
気まぐれさを示すかもしれませんが
01:57
Or it may signal a committed
struggle against obstacles.
一方で 何かの障害と戦ってきたことを
示すのかもしれません
02:02
At the very least, the Scrapper
deserves an interview.
「闘士」には少なくとも
面接してみる価値があります
02:07
To be clear,
断っておきますが
02:12
I don't hold anything
against the Silver Spoon;
別に「銀のスプーン」に
文句があるわけではありません
02:14
getting into and graduating
from an elite university
難関大学に合格し卒業するには
02:17
takes a lot of hard work and sacrifice.
多くの犠牲と努力が必要です
02:20
But if your whole life has been
engineered toward success,
しかし すべて成功を前提とした
人生を歩んできたとしたら
02:24
how will you handle the tough times?
困難にどう対処するのでしょうか?
02:28
One person I hired felt that
because he attended an elite university,
私が採用したある人は
一流大出の自分には
02:31
there were certain assignments
that were beneath him,
相応しくない仕事が
あると考えていました
02:35
like temporarily doing manual labor
to better understand an operation.
仕事のプロセス理解のために
一時的につまらない手作業をさせると
02:38
Eventually, he quit.
彼は辞めてしまいました
02:44
But on the flip side,
それとは逆に
02:47
what happens when your whole life
is destined for failure
敗者の人生を
運命付けられたような人が
02:50
and you actually succeed?
成功を勝ち取っていたとしたら
どうでしょう?
02:54
I want to urge you
to interview the Scrapper.
ぜひ そういう「闘士」を
面接するよう お勧めします
02:57
I know a lot about this
because I am a Scrapper.
私は彼らのことなら良く知っています
私自身が「闘士」だからです
03:02
Before I was born,
私が生まれる前
03:07
my father was diagnosed
with paranoid schizophrenia,
父は妄想型統合失調症と
診断されました
03:09
and he couldn't hold a job
in spite of his brilliance.
聡明であるにも関わらず
仕事を続けることができませんでした
03:13
Our lives were one part "Cuckoo's Nest,"
私たちの人生は ある時は
「カッコーの巣の上で」
03:17
one part "Awakenings"
ある時は「レナードの朝」
03:20
and one part "A Beautiful Mind."
ある時は「ビューティフルマインド」
のようでした
03:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:25
I'm the fourth of five children
raised by a single mother
私は5人兄弟の4番目で
シングルマザーに育てられ
03:28
in a rough neighborhood
in Brooklyn, New York.
ニューヨーク市ブルックリン区の
治安が悪い地域で育ちました
03:32
We never owned a home,
a car, a washing machine,
私たちには持ち家も 自家用車も
洗濯機もなく
03:35
and for most of my childhood,
we didn't even have a telephone.
子供時代を通して家には
電話機さえありませんでした
03:40
So I was highly motivated
だから私は仕事での成功と
「闘士」の関係について
03:45
to understand the relationship
between business success and Scrappers,
大変興味がありました
03:46
because my life could easily
have turned out very differently.
私の人生は大きく違っていた
可能性があったからです
03:50
As I met successful business people
私は成功した実業家に会ったり
03:56
and read profiles of high-powered leaders,
優れたリーダー達の
経歴を読むうちに
03:58
I noticed some commonality.
彼らの共通点に気付きました
04:02
Many of them had experienced
early hardships,
彼らの多くが 若くして苦難の時期を
経験していたのです
04:04
anywhere from poverty, abandonment,
貧困 親による育児放棄
04:08
death of a parent while young,
子供の頃の両親との死別
04:12
to learning disabilities,
alcoholism and violence.
学習障害 アルコール依存症
暴力などです
04:14
The conventional thinking has been
that trauma leads to distress,
伝統的な考え方では トラウマは
後の人生に苦難をもたらすものとされ
04:18
and there's been a lot of focus
on the resulting dysfunction.
その結果生じる機能障害に
焦点が当てられてきました
04:23
But during studies of dysfunction,
data revealed an unexpected insight:
しかし 機能障害の研究が進むと
調査データから予期せぬことが明らかになりました
04:26
that even the worst circumstances
can result in growth and transformation.
最悪の状況においてさえ 人は成長し
変貌を遂げうるということです
04:32
A remarkable and counterintuitive
phenomenon has been discovered,
直感に反する
この注目すべき現象を
04:38
which scientists call
Post Traumatic Growth.
科学者は「心的外傷後成長」と
名付けました
04:42
In one study designed to measure
the effects of adversity
リスクに晒された子供に対し
04:47
on children at risk,
逆境が与える影響を調査した
ある研究では
04:50
among a subset of 698 children
698人の子供の中で
04:52
who experienced the most severe
and extreme conditions,
最も過酷な経験をした
子供達のうち
04:57
fully one-third grew up to lead healthy,
successful and productive lives.
1/3 以上が成人後 健康的で 成功し
生産的な人生を送っています
05:01
In spite of everything and against
tremendous odds, they succeeded.
あらゆる困難と非常に分の悪い条件にも関わらず
成功しているのです
05:08
One-third.
1/3 もの人々が です
05:13
Take this resume.
ある履歴書を見てみましょう
05:15
This guy's parents
give him up for adoption.
この人物は 両親から
養子に出されました
05:17
He never finishes college.
大学は中退し
05:20
He job-hops quite a bit,
職を転々とし
05:23
goes on a sojourn to India for a year,
1年間インドに滞在しています
05:25
and to top it off, he has dyslexia.
その上 彼には
読字障害がありました
05:28
Would you hire this guy?
皆さんだったら
そんな人を採用しますか?
05:32
His name is Steve Jobs.
彼は名を スティーブ・ジョブズ
と言います
05:34
In a study of the world's
most highly successful entrepreneurs,
世界で最も成功した起業家を
調査した結果
05:38
it turns out a disproportionate
number have dyslexia.
読字障害を持つ割合が
非常に高いことが分かりました
05:42
In the US,
米国では調査対象となった
起業家の35%が
05:46
35 percent of the entrepreneurs
studied had dyslexia.
読字障害を持っていたのです
05:48
What's remarkable --
among those entrepreneurs
驚くのは
心的外傷後成長の経験者である
05:52
who experience post traumatic growth,
これらの起業家の中には
05:56
they now view their learning disability
自分の学習障害は
長所になっていて
05:59
as a desirable difficulty
which provided them an advantage
「望ましい欠陥」なのだと
考えている人がいることです
06:03
because they became better listeners
and paid greater attention to detail.
なぜなら そのお陰で 良い聞き手となり
細部に注意を払うようになったからだと
06:07
They don't think they are who they are
in spite of adversity,
彼らは自分が逆境にもかかわらず
成功したとは考えていません
06:13
they know they are who they are
because of adversity.
今の自分があるのも
逆境のお陰だと思っているのです
06:18
They embrace their trauma and hardships
彼らはトラウマや苦難を
06:23
as key elements of who they've become,
自己形成の主要な要素として
受入れるとともに
06:25
and know that without those experiences,
そのような経験がなければ
06:28
they might not have developed
the muscle and grit required
成功に必要な力や根性は
身につかなかったかもしれないことを
06:31
to become successful.
理解しています
06:34
One of my colleagues
had his life completely upended
私の同僚の一人は
06:38
as a result of the Chinese
Cultural Revolution in 1966.
1966年に起きた中国の文化大革命によって
人生を完全にひっくり返されました
06:41
At age 13, his parents were relocated
to the countryside,
13歳の時に 両親が地方の
農村地区に飛ばされ
06:46
the schools were closed
学校は閉鎖になり
06:51
and he was left alone in Beijing
to fend for himself until 16,
16歳で縫製工場の職を得るまで
06:54
when he got a job in a clothing factory.
北京にたった一人残され
自活を余儀なくされました
06:59
But instead of accepting his fate,
しかし彼は運命を
受け入れる代わりに
07:01
he made a resolution that he would
continue his formal education.
いつか学校に戻ることを
誓いました
07:04
Eleven years later, when
the political landscape changed,
11年後 政治状況が変化した時
07:09
he heard about a highly selective
university admissions test.
彼は競争率の高い大学入試の話を
耳にしました
07:13
He had three months to learn
the entire curriculum
受かるためには
中高のカリキュラムを
07:18
of middle and high school.
3か月でマスターしなければ
なりません
07:22
So, every day he came home
from the factory,
毎日 彼は工場から家に帰ると
07:24
took a nap, studied until 4am,
went back to work
仮眠をとった後
午前4時まで勉強し
07:28
and repeated this cycle
every day for three months.
その後 仕事に戻るというサイクルを
3か月間 毎日繰り返しました
07:33
He did it, he succeeded.
彼はそれをやり切って
合格しました
07:38
His commitment to his education
was unwavering, and he never lost hope.
彼の教育への決意は微動だにせず
希望を決して失ないませんでした
07:41
Today, he holds a master's degree,
彼は大学院を出て
修士号を取得し
07:47
and his daughters each have degrees
from Cornell and Harvard.
2人の娘も それぞれコーネル大学と
ハーバード大学を卒業しています
07:50
Scrappers are propelled by the belief
完全にコントロールできるのは自分だけ
という信念によって
07:55
that the only person you have
full control over is yourself.
「闘士」は
動かされています
07:58
When things don't turn out well,
物事がうまくいかない時
彼らは自問します
08:03
Scrappers ask, "What can I do differently
to create a better result?"
「もっとうまくやるには
やり方をどう変えたら良いか?」
08:05
Scrappers have a sense of purpose
「闘士」にはある種の
目的意識があって
08:11
that prevents them
from giving up on themselves,
容易にはくじけません
08:13
kind of like if you've survived poverty,
a crazy father and several muggings,
貧困や 狂った父親や 度重なる強盗との遭遇を
生き抜いてきた彼らは言うでしょう
08:16
you figure, "Business challenges? --
「仕事上の困難だって?!」
08:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:25
Really?
「本気で言ってるの?
08:26
Piece of cake. I got this."
そんなの何でもない まかせろ」
08:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:29
And that reminds me -- humor.
それで思い出すのは
ユーモア感覚です
08:30
Scrappers know that humor
gets you through the tough times,
「闘士」は困難を
ユーモアで切り抜けられること
08:33
and laughter helps you
change your perspective.
笑いがものの見え方を
変えてくれることを知っています
08:36
And finally, there are relationships.
そして最後に 人間関係があります
08:40
People who overcome adversity
don't do it alone.
逆境に打ち勝った人々は
単独で成し遂げているわけではありません
08:43
Somewhere along the way,
成功への道のりのどこかで
08:47
they find people who
bring out the best in them
彼らは自分の長所を引き出し
自分の成功に投資してくれる人に
08:49
and who are invested in their success.
出会っています
08:52
Having someone you can
count on no matter what
どんな時でも
頼りにできる人の存在が
08:56
is essential to overcoming adversity.
逆境に打ち勝つ為には
必要なのです
08:59
I was lucky.
私は幸運でした
09:02
In my first job after college,
大学を卒業して
仕事を始めた頃
09:04
I didn't have a car, so I carpooled
across two bridges
私は車を持っていなくて
09:06
with a woman who was
the president's assistant.
社長アシスタントの女性と
車の相乗り通勤をしていました
09:09
She watched me work
彼女は私の働き方を見て
09:13
and encouraged me to focus on my future
励ましてくれました
09:14
and not dwell on my past.
これからのことに集中し
過去をくよくよ考えるなと
09:17
Along the way I've met many people
私はこれまでの人生で
多くの人々に出会い
09:20
who've provided me
brutally honest feedback,
彼らは本音で私に対して
09:23
advice and mentorship.
意見やアドバイスや
指導をしてくれました
09:27
These people don't mind
彼らは 私がかつて
学費を払うために
09:29
that I once worked as a singing waitress
to help pay for college.
歌うウェイトレスをしていたことなんて
気にしませんでした
09:31
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:36
I'll leave you with one final,
valuable insight.
最後に大事なヒントを
皆さんに お教えしようと思います
09:37
Companies that are committed
to diversity and inclusive practices
多様性とインクルーシブな実践に
取り組む企業は
09:40
tend to support Scrappers
「闘士」タイプを支援し
09:45
and outperform their peers.
業績も優れている傾向があります
09:48
According to DiversityInc,
DiversityInc誌の調査によれば
09:51
a study of their top 50
companies for diversity
多様性において
上位50社に入る企業は
09:54
outperformed the S&P 500 by 25 percent.
S&P 500を利益率で
25%上回るという結果が出ています
09:57
So back to my original question.
最初の質問に戻りますが
10:04
Who are you going to bet on:
皆さんはどちらに賭けますか?
10:08
Silver Spoon or Scrapper?
「銀のスプーン」か「闘士」か?
10:10
I say choose the underestimated contender,
私は 過小評価されている候補者を
選ぶべきだと言いたい
10:13
whose secret weapons
are passion and purpose.
彼らには情熱と目的意識という
隠れた武器があります
10:17
Hire the Scrapper.
「闘士」を雇いましょう
10:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:24
Translated by Ken Yoda
Reviewed by Yasushi Aoki

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Regina Hartley - Human Resources Manager, UPS
Regina Hartley thinks that those who don't always look good on paper may be just the person you need to hire.

Why you should listen

Throughout her 25-year UPS career – working in talent acquisition, succession planning, learning and development, employee relations, and communications – Regina Hartley has seen how, given the opportunity, people with passion and purpose will astound you. Today, Hartley is a human resources director for UPS Information Services, and makes human connections with employees immersed in technology.

She holds a BA in political science from SUNY Binghamton and an MA in corporate and organizational communication from Fairleigh Dickinson University. She is a certified Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) from the HRCI.

More profile about the speaker
Regina Hartley | Speaker | TED.com