English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2013

Amanda Palmer: The art of asking

アマンダ・パーマー 「“お願い” するということ」

Filmed
Views 9,090,420

音楽にお金を出させるのではなく、払いたい人が払えるようにしてあげればいいんだとアマンダ・パーマーは言います。「2メートル半の花嫁 (!)」として帽子にお金を集めていたストリート・パフォーマー時代で始まる情熱的な語りを通して、彼女はアーティストとファンの新しい関係を考察しています。

- Musician, blogger
Alt-rock icon Amanda Fucking Palmer believes we shouldn't fight the fact that digital content is freely shareable -- and suggests that artists can and should be directly supported by fans. Full bio

(Breathes in, breathes out)
(深呼吸)
00:26
So I didn't always make my living from music.
ずっと音楽で食べてこられた
訳ではありません
00:33
For about the five years after graduating
ちゃんとした大学の
00:37
from an upstanding liberal arts university,
教養学部を卒業した後
5年位は ―
00:39
this was my day job.
こっちが私の本業
00:42
I was a self-employed living statue called the 8-Foot Bride,
「2メートル半の花嫁」という名の
生きた彫刻をしていました
00:47
and I love telling people l did this for a job,
私は進んで これを仕事にしていたと
言っています
00:51
because everybody always wants to know,
みんな知りたがるからです
00:55
who are these freaks in real life?
「いったい こいつら
普段 何をやってんだ?」
00:57
Hello.
これが仕事なんで
01:00
I painted myself white one day, stood on a box,
顔を白く塗って箱の上に立ち ―
01:02
put a hat or a can at my feet,
帽子とか缶を足元に置きます
01:04
and when someone came by and dropped in money,
誰かがお金を入れてくれたら
01:07
I handed them a flower and some intense eye contact.
花を差し出して
じっと見つめるんです
01:09
And if they didn't take the flower,
受け取ってもらえない時は
01:17
I threw in a gesture of sadness and longing
悲しそうに訴えるポーズで
01:19
as they walked away.
歩み去る姿を見送ります
01:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:27
So I had the most profound encounters with people,
感動的な出会いも経験しました
01:30
especially lonely people who looked
特に寂しい人たち ―
01:35
like they hadn't talked to anyone in weeks,
何週間も 誰とも
話してないような人に出会って
01:37
and we would get this beautiful moment
通りの真ん中で 見つめ合うという
美しい瞬間を経験しました
01:40
of prolonged eye contact being allowed in a city street,
通りの真ん中で 見つめ合うという
美しい瞬間を経験しました
01:44
and we would sort of fall in love a little bit.
ちょっとした恋愛のようでした
01:48
And my eyes would say, "Thank you. I see you."
「ありがとう あなたのこと
ちゃんと見ているから」と目で訴えると
01:51
And their eyes would say,
相手の目も語ります
01:57
"Nobody ever sees me. Thank you."
「誰も僕を見てくれやしないんだ
ありがとう」
02:00
And I would get harassed sometimes.
イヤな経験もしました
02:06
People would yell at me from their passing cars.
通りすがりの車から
02:08
"Get a job!"
「仕事しろ!」って怒鳴られます
02:10
And I'd be, like, "This is my job."
「これ仕事だから」とツッコミますが
02:12
But it hurt, because it made me fear
それでも やっぱり傷つきます
02:15
that I was somehow doing something un-joblike
仕事らしくない 卑怯で ―
02:19
and unfair, shameful.
恥ずかしいことでもしてるようで
不安になりました
02:23
I had no idea how perfect a real education I was getting
この箱の上で
音楽ビジネスについて
02:26
for the music business on this box.
どれほど学んだか
わかりません
02:31
And for the economists out there,
経済学者の方なら
02:34
you may be interested to know I actually made a pretty predictable income,
日々の収入を予想できたことに
興味を持つかも
02:36
which was shocking to me
常連がいるわけじゃないから ―
02:39
given I had no regular customers,
いつも驚いていました
02:41
but pretty much 60 bucks on a Tuesday, 90 bucks on a Friday.
火曜は60ドル 金曜は90ドルと
02:44
It was consistent.
一定なんです
02:47
And meanwhile, I was touring locally
その頃
ドレスデン・ドールズというバンドで
02:48
and playing in nightclubs with my band, the Dresden Dolls.
地元を回ったり
クラブで演奏していました
02:51
This was me on piano, a genius drummer.
ピアノの私と 天才ドラマーで
02:53
I wrote the songs, and eventually
曲は私が書きました
02:55
we started making enough money that I could quit being a statue,
十分お金が入るようになったので
生きた彫刻をやめ
02:58
and as we started touring,
ツアーをするようになっても
03:01
I really didn't want to lose this sense
あの 人と触れ合う感覚は
03:04
of direct connection with people, because I loved it.
失いたくありませんでした
大好きだったから
03:06
So after all of our shows, we would sign autographs
だからショーが終わると
ファンにサインしたり
03:09
and hug fans and hang out and talk to people,
ハグしたり
おしゃべりしたりしてました
03:12
and we made an art out of asking people to help us
手伝ってとか 一緒にやってと
頼んでいるうちに
03:16
and join us, and I would track down local musicians
仕組ができました
地元のアーティストを呼んで
03:21
and artists and they would set up outside of our shows,
ライブ会場の外で
何かやってもらう
03:23
and they would pass the hat,
彼らは帽子に お金を集めて
03:28
and then they would come in and join us onstage,
後でステージに合流
03:29
so we had this rotating smorgasbord of weird, random circus guests.
いろんな面白いゲストが
どんどん登場して もう大騒ぎ
03:31
And then Twitter came along,
Twitter が出てくると
いつでも どこでも
03:36
and made things even more magic, because I could ask
何でも頼めるようになって
03:39
instantly for anything anywhere.
もっとすごいことになりました
03:41
So I would need a piano to practice on,
ピアノを練習したくなったら
03:43
and an hour later I would be at a fan's house. This is in London.
1時間後にはファンの家にいます
これはロンドンです
03:46
People would bring home-cooked food to us
皆が各国の手料理を
差し入れしてくれて
03:49
all over the world backstage and feed us and eat with us. This is in Seattle.
楽屋で一緒に食べたり
これはシアトル
03:51
Fans who worked in museums and stores
美術館やお店や
公共の場所で働いてるファンは
03:55
and any kind of public space would wave their hands
突然 押しかけて
無料のゲリラ・ライブをしても
03:59
if I would decide to do a last-minute, spontaneous, free gig.
ちゃんと反応してくれます
04:02
This is a library in Auckland.
ここはオークランドの図書館
04:06
On Saturday I tweeted for this crate and hat,
TEDで使う箱と帽子を わざわざ
東海岸から運びたくなかったから
04:09
because I did not want to schlep them from the East Coast,
土曜に欲しいって
ツイートしたら
04:14
and they showed up care of this dude, Chris
ニューポート・ビーチから
04:15
from Newport Beach, who says hello.
このクリスが持ってきてくれました
“ハロー”って言ってます
04:17
I once tweeted, where in Melbourne can I buy a neti pot?
メルボルンで「鼻洗浄器はどこで買える?」
ってツイートしたら
04:21
And a nurse from a hospital drove one
看護師をしてる人が即座に
私のいるカフェまで ―
04:24
right at that moment to the cafe I was in,
車で持って来てくれました
04:27
and I bought her a smoothie
スムージーをおごって
04:29
and we sat there talking about nursing and death.
看護と死について話しました
04:31
And I love this kind of random closeness,
こんな幸運な
偶然の触れ合いが好きです
04:34
which is lucky, because I do a lot of couchsurfing.
私は よく他人の家を泊まり歩きます
04:36
In mansions where everyone in my crew gets their own room
メンバーそれぞれに部屋がもらえるけど
Wi-Fi はない豪邸もあれば
04:40
but there's no wireless, and in punk squats,
みんな床に雑魚寝で
トイレもない ―
04:44
everyone on the floor in one room with no toilets
でもWi-Fi は有る
ボロ部屋もあり ―
04:47
but with wireless, clearly making it the better option.
そっちの方がいいわよね
04:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:54
My crew once pulled our van
以前 スタッフと行ったのは
04:56
up to a really poor Miami neighborhood
マイアミ郊外のすごく貧しい地域
04:58
and we found out that our couchsurfing host for the night
その晩 泊めてくれたのは
05:02
was an 18-year-old girl, still living at home,
まだ親元に住んでいる
18才の女の子でした
05:05
and her family were all undocumented immigrants from Honduras.
家族全員 ホンジュラスからの
不法移民です
05:08
And that night, her whole family
その夜は私達がベッドに ―
05:12
took the couches and she slept together with her mom
寝られるように
家族全員がソファに寝て
05:15
so that we could take their beds.
その子は母親と寝ていました
05:18
And I lay there thinking,
私は横になって考えました
05:21
these people have so little.
この家族は何も持ってないのに ―
05:23
Is this fair?
私がベッドを取っていいのか?
05:26
And in the morning, her mom taught us how
翌朝 お母さんがトルティーヤの
作り方を教えてくれて
05:29
to try to make tortillas and wanted to give me a Bible,
聖書をくれようとしました
05:32
and she took me aside and she said to me in her broken English,
それから私を呼んで
つたない英語で言うんです
05:34
"Your music has helped my daughter so much.
「あなたの音楽が娘の支えなの ―
05:40
Thank you for staying here. We're all so grateful."
来てくれてありがとう
皆とても感謝してる」って
05:45
And I thought, this is fair.
私は それなら受け取って
いいんだと思いました
05:49
This is this.
交換なんです
05:53
A couple months later, I was in Manhattan,
2か月後 マンハッタンで
05:57
and I tweeted for a crash pad, and at midnight,
寝場所を求めてツイートしました
05:59
I'm ringing a doorbell on the Lower East Side,
夜中にドアベルを押して ふと ―
06:02
and it occurs to me I've never actually done this alone.
一人は初めてだと気付きました
いつもは誰かが一緒です
06:04
I've always been with my band or my crew.
一人は初めてだと気付きました
いつもは誰かが一緒です
06:06
Is this what stupid people do? (Laughter)
「もしかして これってバカのすること?」
と思いました(笑)
06:08
Is this how stupid people die?
「バカはこうやって死ぬのかな?」
06:12
And before I can change my mind, the door busts open.
やめようと思った時
ドアが開いて
06:15
She's an artist. He's a financial blogger for Reuters,
芸術家と金融系記者の
カップルが出てきました
06:17
and they're pouring me a glass of red wine
一緒に赤ワインを飲んで
お風呂も
06:20
and offering me a bath,
貸してくれました
06:23
and I have had thousands of nights like that and like that.
数え切れないほど
そんな夜を過ごしてきました
06:24
So I couchsurf a lot. I also crowdsurf a lot.
私はよく泊まり歩きますし
ステージダイブもたくさんします
06:29
I maintain couchsurfing and crowdsurfing
泊まり歩くのも
ステージダイブするのも
06:33
are basically the same thing.
本質的には同じだと 私は思います
06:36
You're falling into the audience
観客に飛び込むのは
お互いの信頼の証です
06:38
and you're trusting each other.
観客に飛び込むのは
お互いの信頼の証です
06:41
I once asked an opening band of mine
以前 前座のバンドに
こう勧めたことがあります
06:42
if they wanted to go out into the crowd and pass the hat
観客に帽子を回して
お金をもらったら?
06:45
to get themselves some extra money, something that I did a lot.
私もよくやっていたけど?
06:48
And as usual, the band was psyched,
みんな張り切って行くのに
06:50
but there was this one guy in the band
1人だけ動こうとしません
06:52
who told me he just couldn't bring himself to go out there.
どうしても行く気になれない ―
06:54
It felt too much like begging to stand there with the hat.
物乞いをするような
気持ちになるって
06:58
And I recognized his fear of "Is this fair?" and "Get a job."
彼の怖れは 私にも馴染みのある あの声です
「もらっていいのか?」そして「仕事しろ!」
07:02
And meanwhile, my band is becoming bigger and bigger.
そうこうする内に
うちのバンドの人気は上がっていき
07:11
We signed with a major label.
メジャー・レーベルと契約しました
07:14
And our music is a cross between punk and cabaret.
私達の音楽はパンクと
キャバレーの中間で
07:17
It's not for everybody.
好き嫌いが分かれます
07:19
Well, maybe it's for you.
でも あなたの好みかも
07:21
We sign, and there's all this hype leading up to our next record.
それで私たちのアルバムは
派手に宣伝され
07:25
And it comes out and it sells about 25,000 copies in the first few weeks,
発売後 最初の数週で
2万5千枚売れたのに
07:29
and the label considers this a failure.
会社側は失敗だって言うんです
07:34
And I was like, "25,000, isn't that a lot?"
「それって多くないの?」と言うと
07:38
They were like, "No, the sales are going down. It's a failure."
向こうは
「売上は落ちてるし 失敗だ」と
07:40
And they walk off.
そんな感じで撤退していきました
07:43
Right at this same time, I'm signing and hugging after a gig,
同じ頃 ライブの後 ファンに
サインやハグをしてたら
07:45
and a guy comes up to me
男の人が近づいてきて
07:48
and hands me a $10 bill,
私に10ドル札を差し出して 言うんです
07:50
and he says,
私に10ドル札を差し出して 言うんです
07:52
"I'm sorry, I burned your CD from a friend."
「ごめんなさい 友達のCDを
コピーしました ― 」
07:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:58
"But I read your blog, I know you hate your label.
「でもブログで あのレコード会社
嫌いなの知ってるから
08:01
I just want you to have this money."
このお金はあなたに
受け取って欲しい」
08:04
And this starts happening all the time.
こんなことが
よく起こるようになりました
08:07
I become the hat after my own gigs,
ライブの後に 私が
お金を集める帽子役になり
08:11
but I have to physically stand there and take the help from people,
実際にみんなの前に立って
支援を募るんです
08:14
and unlike the guy in the opening band,
さっきの前座の彼と違って
08:17
I've actually had a lot of practice standing there.
そうするのは
慣れているので
08:20
Thank you.
「ありがと」って受け取ります
08:24
And this is the moment I decide
この時 心に決めたんです
08:26
I'm just going to give away my music for free
できる限りタダで
音楽をオンライン配信しようって
08:28
online whenever possible,
できる限りタダで
音楽をオンライン配信しようって
08:31
so it's like Metallica over here, Napster, bad;
メタリカは
Napsterを叩いたけど
08:33
Amanda Palmer over here, and I'm going to encourage
アマンダ・パーマー的には
08:36
torrenting, downloading, sharing, but I'm going to ask for help,
P2Pもダウンロードも共有もOK
でも支援を お願いしよう
08:39
because I saw it work on the street.
ストリートでは
うまくいったんだから
08:43
So I fought my way off my label and for my next project
私は苦労してレーベルを離れ
次のバンド ―
08:46
with my new band, the Grand Theft Orchestra,
グランド・セフト・オーケストラを
立ち上げました
08:49
I turned to crowdfunding,
クラウドファンディングに目をつけ
08:52
and I fell into those thousands of connections that I'd made,
これまで築いてきた何千もの
つながりに飛び込んで
08:55
and I asked my crowd to catch me.
皆に「支えて」と頼んだんです
08:59
And the goal was 100,000 dollars.
目標は10万ドル
でもファンの支援は ―
09:02
My fans backed me at nearly 1.2 million,
120万ドル近くにもなりました
09:05
which was the biggest music crowdfunding project to date.
音楽系クラウドファンディングの
最高記録です
09:08
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:12
And you can see how many people it is.
支援者の数がわかりますか?
09:16
It's about 25,000 people.
だいたい2万5千人です
09:20
And the media asked, "Amanda,
メディアは こう聞いてきます
09:24
the music business is tanking and you encourage piracy.
「音楽業界は落ち目なのに
君は音楽をフリーで配布
09:26
How did you make all these people pay for music?"
どうやって金を出させたんだ」
09:28
And the real answer is, I didn't make them. I asked them.
出させたんじゃない
頼んだんです
09:30
And through the very act of asking people,
頼むことで人とのつながりができ ―
09:36
I'd connected with them,
頼むことで人とのつながりができ ―
09:39
and when you connect with them, people want to help you.
つながりができれば
みんな助けてくれる
09:41
It's kind of counterintuitive for a lot of artists.
アーティストの多くは
そんなバカなと思っています
09:46
They don't want to ask for things.
誰かに頼るなんてとんでもないって
09:50
But it's not easy. It's not easy to ask.
助けを求めるのは
簡単なことじゃないから ―
09:52
And a lot of artists have a problem with this.
抵抗を感じる人が多いんです
09:58
Asking makes you vulnerable.
頼むのは 自分を無防備にすることだから
10:00
And I got a lot of criticism online
Kickstarterでの支援額が大きくなるにつれ
ネット上で —
10:02
after my Kickstarter went big
非難されるようになりました
10:06
for continuing my crazy crowdsourcing practices,
相変わらず 皆に
頼み続けていたからです
10:08
specifically for asking musicians
特にファンのミュージシャン達に
10:11
who are fans if they wanted to join us on stage
愛情と ライブのチケットと
ビールを出すから
10:13
for a few songs in exchange for love and tickets
何曲か私達と一緒にやろうと
誘ったのが やり玉に上がりました
10:16
and beer, and this was a doctored image
これはあるサイトに上げられた
加工した私の画像です
10:20
that went up of me on a website.
これはあるサイトに上げられた
加工した私の画像です
10:23
And this hurt in a really familiar way.
傷ついたけど 似た経験はしてます
10:26
And people saying, "You're not allowed anymore
「お前に好意を受ける資格はない」と
非難する人達を見ると
10:29
to ask for that kind of help,"
「お前に好意を受ける資格はない」と
非難する人達を見ると
10:32
really reminded me of the people in their cars yelling, "Get a job."
車から「仕事しろ」と
叫んでいた人と重なります
10:34
Because they weren't with us on the sidewalk,
あの人達は 一緒に歩道に
立ってるわけじゃないから
10:39
and they couldn't see the exchange
私と観客の間で
交わされているものが
10:43
that was happening between me and my crowd,
わからない
10:47
an exchange that was very fair to us but alien to them.
私達にとって公平な関係でも
彼らには理解できないのです
10:49
So this is slightly not safe for work.
職場で見てる人には問題ありかも
10:54
This is my Kickstarter backer party in Berlin.
ベルリンでのKickstarter
支援パーティーでは
10:56
At the end of the night, I stripped and let everyone draw on me.
私が脱いで 体に
いろいろ書いてもらいました
10:59
Now let me tell you, if you want to experience
もし 人への信頼を
11:02
the visceral feeling of trusting strangers,
心の底から感じてみたいなら
11:05
I recommend this,
オススメです
11:08
especially if those strangers are drunk German people.
特に 酔っぱらったドイツ人相手なら
最高の経験になるはず
11:10
This was a ninja master-level fan connection,
達人レベルのファン交流です
11:14
because what I was really saying here was,
というのも そこで伝えたのは ―
11:19
I trust you this much.
「あなたをこんなに信頼してる ―
11:22
Should I? Show me.
信頼していい? 証拠を見せて」
ということだから
11:25
For most of human history,
人類の歴史が始まって以来
11:29
musicians, artists, they've been part of the community,
アーティストはずっと
コミュニティーの一部でした
11:30
connectors and openers, not untouchable stars.
人をつなぎ 開放する役であって
手の届かないスターではなかった
11:36
Celebrity is about a lot of people loving you from a distance,
スターとは 遠くにも愛してくれる人が
たくさんいるということですが
11:40
but the Internet and the content
ネットや 自由に共有できる
コンテンツのおかげで
11:45
that we're freely able to share on it
ネットや 自由に共有できる
コンテンツのおかげで
11:47
are taking us back.
再び 皆が つながれる
ようになりました
11:49
It's about a few people loving you up close
そこには 数は少なくても ―
11:52
and about those people being enough.
近くで応援してくれる人がいて
それで十分なんです
11:56
So a lot of people are confused by the idea
応援に “定価” はないから
戸惑う人もいて ―
12:00
of no hard sticker price.
応援に “定価” はないから
戸惑う人もいて ―
12:03
They see it as an unpredictable risk, but the things I've done,
これをリスクと思っているけど
Kickstarterも
12:04
the Kickstarter, the street, the doorbell,
路上パフォーマンスも 深夜のドアベルも
12:07
I don't see these things as risk.
私にとってはリスクじゃない
12:09
I see them as trust.
信頼の表れです
12:11
Now, the online tools to make the exchange
路上で交換するのと同じくらい ―
12:13
as easy and as instinctive as the street,
簡単で直感的なオンライン・ツールが
12:17
they're getting there.
実現しつつあります
12:20
But the perfect tools aren't going to help us
でも互いに向き合い
遠慮なくやり取りできないなら
12:22
if we can't face each other
いくらツールが完璧でも
12:26
and give and receive fearlessly,
役には立ちません
12:28
but, more important,
それ以上に大切なのは
12:31
to ask without shame.
恥ずかしがらずに
助けを求めることです
12:34
My music career has been spent
私はこれまでミュージシャンとして
12:37
trying to encounter people on the Internet
ネット上の出会いを
大切にして来ました
12:40
the way I could on the box,
あの箱の上での出会いと同じように
12:43
so blogging and tweeting not just about my tour dates
だからブログやツイートでは
ツアー日程や
12:45
and my new video but about our work and our art
新作PVのことだけでなく
私達の仕事も アートも
12:49
and our fears and our hangovers, our mistakes,
不安も 二日酔いも
失敗したことだって書きます
12:53
and we see each other.
それから会うんです
12:57
And I think when we really see each other,
実際に会えば
助け合いたくなるはず
12:59
we want to help each other.
実際に会えば
助け合いたくなるはず
13:03
I think people have been obsessed with the wrong question,
みんな誤った問いから
離れられないんです ―
13:06
which is, "How do we make people pay for music?"
「どうやって 音楽にお金を出させるか?」
13:10
What if we started asking,
でも こう考えたらどうでしょう ―
13:14
"How do we let people pay for music?"
「どうすれば音楽に お金を出せるように
してあげられるだろう?」
13:16
Thank you.
ありがとう
13:21
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:24
Translated by Kazunori Akashi
Reviewed by Emi Kamiya

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Amanda Palmer - Musician, blogger
Alt-rock icon Amanda Fucking Palmer believes we shouldn't fight the fact that digital content is freely shareable -- and suggests that artists can and should be directly supported by fans.

Why you should listen

Amanda Palmer commands attention. The singer-songwriter-blogger-provocateur, known for pushing boundaries in both her art and her lifestyle, made international headlines this year when she raised nearly $1.2 million via Kickstarter (she’d asked for $100k) from nearly 25,000 fans who pre-ordered her new album, Theatre Is Evil.
 
But the former street performer, then Dresden Dolls frontwoman, now solo artist hit a bump the week her world tour kicked off. She revealed plans to crowdsource additional local backup musicians in each tour stop, offering to pay them in hugs, merchandise and beer per her custom. Bitter and angry criticism ensued (she eventually promised to pay her local collaborators in cash). And it's interesting to consider why. As Laurie Coots suggests: "The idea was heckled because we didn't understand the value exchange -- the whole idea of asking the crowd for what you need when you need it and not asking for more or less."

Summing up her business model, in which she views her recorded music as the digital equivalent of street performing, she says: “I firmly believe in music being as free as possible. Unlocked. Shared and spread. In order for artists to survive and create, their audiences need to step up and directly support them.”

Amanda's non-fiction book, The Art of Asking, digs deeply into the topics she addressed in her TED Talk. 

More profile about the speaker
Amanda Palmer | Speaker | TED.com