English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2007

Daniel Goleman: Why aren't we more compassionate?

ダニエル・ゴールマンが思いやりを語る

Filmed
Views 1,642,504

「EQ―こころの知能指数」の著者であるダニエル・ゴールマンが、なぜ私たちは人に思いやりを与える機会を逃してしまうのか問いかけます

- Psychologist
Daniel Goleman, psychologist and award-winning author of Emotional Intelligence and other books on EI, challenges traditional measures of intelligence as a predictor of life success. Full bio

You know, I'm struck by how one of the implicit themes of TED
TEDの潜在的なテーマである「思いやり」が 私の中で尾を引いています
00:13
is compassion, these very moving demonstrations we've just seen:
感動的な講演がいくつもありましたね
00:17
HIV in Africa, President Clinton last night.
アフリカでのHIVや 昨晩のクリントン元大統領の講演です
00:21
And I'd like to do a little collateral thinking, if you will,
それに付随して 思いやりについて
00:25
about compassion and bring it from the global level to the personal.
世界規模から個人へとレベルを移して お話しします
00:30
I'm a psychologist, but rest assured,
私は心理学者ですが
00:35
I will not bring it to the scrotal.
安心して下さい
00:37
(Laughter)
陰嚢には触れません (笑)
00:39
There was a very important study done a while ago
少し前にプリンストン神学校で行われた
00:44
at Princeton Theological Seminary that speaks to why it is
なぜ私たちは人を助ける機会があるのに
00:46
that when all of us have so many opportunities to help,
助けたり 助けなかったりするのか
00:51
we do sometimes, and we don't other times.
と問いかける とても重要な研究があります
00:54
A group of divinity students at the Princeton Theological Seminary
プリンストン神学校の神学生たちが
00:58
were told that they were going to give a practice sermon
説教の練習をすると告げられて
01:02
and they were each given a sermon topic.
それぞれに説教のテーマが与えられました
01:06
Half of those students were given, as a topic,
学生の半分はテーマとして
01:09
the parable of the Good Samaritan:
「善きサマリア人」の寓話を与えられました
01:12
the man who stopped the stranger in --
これは困窮している道端の見知らぬ人を
01:14
to help the stranger in need by the side of the road.
助けた男の話です
01:17
Half were given random Bible topics.
残りの半分は聖書の他のテーマをランダムに与えられました
01:19
Then one by one, they were told they had to go to another building
そして 1人ずつ別の建物に行って
01:22
and give their sermon.
説教をするように言われました
01:26
As they went from the first building to the second,
1つ目の建物から次の建物に移動する時に
01:27
each of them passed a man who was bent over and moaning,
前かがみになってうめき声を上げて 明らかに困窮している男が
01:30
clearly in need. The question is: Did they stop to help?
道の脇にいます 学生たちは立ち止まって彼を助けたでしょうか?
01:34
The more interesting question is:
もっと面白い問いかけ方をすると
01:38
Did it matter they were contemplating the parable
「善きサマリア人」の寓話をじっくり考えることで
01:40
of the Good Samaritan? Answer: No, not at all.
学生の行動は変化するのでしょうか?その答えは「全く変わらない」です
01:43
What turned out to determine whether someone would stop
わかったのは 誰かが困窮している見知らぬ人のために
01:48
and help a stranger in need
立ち止まって助けるかどうかは
01:51
was how much of a hurry they thought they were in --
どれほどその人が急いでいると感じているかどうか
01:52
were they feeling they were late, or were they absorbed
どれほど遅れていると感じているかどうか
01:56
in what they were going to talk about.
これから話すことに夢中になっているかどうか で決まること
02:00
And this is, I think, the predicament of our lives:
これは私たちの人生の境遇を表していると思います
02:02
that we don't take every opportunity to help
意識が間違った方向に向かっているから
02:05
because our focus is in the wrong direction.
私たちは誰かを助ける機会をいつも逃してしまいます
02:09
There's a new field in brain science, social neuroscience.
社会神経科学という脳科学の新しい分野があります
02:12
This studies the circuitry in two people's brains
2人で相互交流している時に活動する
02:16
that activates while they interact.
神経回路を研究する分野です
02:20
And the new thinking about compassion from social neuroscience
社会神経科学による思いやりの新しい考え方は
02:22
is that our default wiring is to help.
脳の配線は基本的に人を助けるようにできていることです
02:26
That is to say, if we attend to the other person,
つまり 人が誰かに注意を向けた時
02:30
we automatically empathize, we automatically feel with them.
自動的に共感して 相手の感情を読み取るのです
02:35
There are these newly identified neurons, mirror neurons,
新しく発見された 神経の無線LANのように働くミラーニューロンが
02:39
that act like a neuro Wi-Fi, activating in our brain
1人の脳の中で活動すると もう1人の脳の同じ場所でも活動します
02:41
exactly the areas activated in theirs. We feel "with" automatically.
自動的に「一緒に」感じるわけです
02:45
And if that person is in need, if that person is suffering,
だからもし誰かが困窮していたり苦しんでいたりしたら
02:49
we're automatically prepared to help. At least that's the argument.
私たちは自動的に助けようとします 少なくとも理論上はそうなっています
02:54
But then the question is: Why don't we?
しかしここに疑問があります なぜ実際にそうしないのか?
02:58
And I think this speaks to a spectrum
この問いかけは 全くの自己陶酔
03:01
that goes from complete self-absorption,
他者への気づき 共感 思いやり
03:04
to noticing, to empathy and to compassion.
といった範囲にまで及ぶものです
03:07
And the simple fact is, if we are focused on ourselves,
単純な事実は 私たちがよく一日中そうしているように
03:09
if we're preoccupied, as we so often are throughout the day,
もし自分自身に意識を向けていたら もし心を奪われていたら
03:14
we don't really fully notice the other.
他者に十分に注意を向けることができないということです
03:17
And this difference between the self and the other focus
この自己への意識と他者への意識の違いは
03:20
can be very subtle.
とても微妙なものです
03:22
I was doing my taxes the other day, and I got to the point
私は先日 税金の申告手続きをしていて
03:23
where I was listing all of the donations I gave,
自分がした寄付をリストにしていた時に
03:27
and I had an epiphany, it was -- I came to my check
ひらめきがありました セヴァ基金の小切手を見たら
03:30
to the Seva Foundation and I noticed that I thought,
私がセヴァ基金に寄付をしたことで
03:33
boy, my friend Larry Brilliant would really be happy
友人のラリー ブリリアントがとても喜ぶだろうと
03:36
that I gave money to Seva.
思ったことに気がつきました
03:39
Then I realized that what I was getting from giving
私が与えることで手に入れたのは
03:40
was a narcissistic hit -- that I felt good about myself.
自己陶酔的なものでした 私はいい気になっていたのです
03:43
Then I started to think about the people in the Himalayas
それから私は 白内障の治療をしてもらえる
03:47
whose cataracts would be helped, and I realized
ヒマラヤの人々のことを考え始め
03:52
that I went from this kind of narcissistic self-focus
そして自己陶酔ではなく 利他的な喜びと
03:55
to altruistic joy, to feeling good
他の人々に対しての良い思いを抱くようになったのだと
03:59
for the people that were being helped. I think that's a motivator.
気づきました これこそが動機です
04:02
But this distinction between focusing on ourselves
この自分自身に向ける意識と
04:06
and focusing on others
他者に向ける意識を区別することは
04:09
is one that I encourage us all to pay attention to.
是非とも気を配った方がいいです
04:10
You can see it at a gross level in the world of dating.
デートのことを考えれば これは世界共通だとわかります
04:13
I was at a sushi restaurant a while back
しばらく前に寿司屋へ行った時に
04:17
and I overheard two women talking about the brother of one woman,
2人の女性の会話を小耳にはさみました
04:20
who was in the singles scene. And this woman says,
片方の女性が兄弟のデートの話をしていたのです
04:24
"My brother is having trouble getting dates,
「私の兄弟はまともにデートができなくって
04:27
so he's trying speed dating." I don't know if you know speed dating?
スピードデートをしているのよ」  スピードデートとは
04:29
Women sit at tables and men go from table to table,
テーブルに女性陣が座り 向かいに座る男性陣は順番に席を移ります
04:31
and there's a clock and a bell, and at five minutes, bingo,
5分ごとに鳴るベルが会話終了の合図で
04:35
the conversation ends and the woman can decide
女性は そこで名刺や
04:39
whether to give her card or her email address to the man
メールアドレスを男性に渡すかどうか決めます
04:41
for follow up. And this woman says,
先ほどの女性は言いました
04:45
"My brother's never gotten a card, and I know exactly why.
「私の兄弟は名刺をもらったことが一度も無いの 理由は簡単にわかる
04:47
The moment he sits down, he starts talking non-stop about himself;
彼は座ったらいつまでも自分のことを喋り続けて
04:51
he never asks about the woman."
女性に質問をしないの」
04:56
And I was doing some research in the Sunday Styles section
ニューヨーク タイムズのサンデー スタイルズの記事で
04:58
of The New York Times, looking at the back stories of marriages --
結婚の裏話を調査していました
05:03
because they're very interesting -- and I came to the marriage
とても面白いのです
05:06
of Alice Charney Epstein. And she said
アリス チャーニー エプスタイン という女性の話がありました
05:09
that when she was in the dating scene,
デートをしている時 彼女は
05:12
she had a simple test she put people to.
相手に簡単なテストをしていると言います
05:15
The test was: from the moment they got together,
テストの内容は 2人が会った瞬間から
05:18
how long it would take the guy to ask her a question
男性が「君は」という言葉が入った質問をするまでに
05:20
with the word "you" in it.
どれくらいの時間を要するのか
05:23
And apparently Epstein aced the test, therefore the article.
確かにエプスタインはそのテストを上手く利用しました 記事になりましたから
05:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:29
Now this is a -- it's a little test
これは簡単でシンプルなテストです
05:30
I encourage you to try out at a party.
パーティーで試してみるといいでしょう
05:32
Here at TED there are great opportunities.
TEDはすごくいい機会です
05:34
The Harvard Business Review recently had an article called
ハーバード ビジネス レビューが最近「ヒューマン モメント」という
05:38
"The Human Moment," about how to make real contact
職場における誠実な人間関係の築き方に関する
05:41
with a person at work. And they said, well,
記事を掲載しました その記事によると
05:44
the fundamental thing you have to do is turn off your BlackBerry,
まず 携帯の電源を切り
05:47
close your laptop, end your daydream
パソコンを閉じて 空想をやめて
05:51
and pay full attention to the person.
相手に最大限の注意を向けること
05:55
There is a newly coined word in the English language
一緒にいる人が いきなり携帯を使いだし
05:58
for the moment when the person we're with whips out their BlackBerry
自分の存在が無視された状態を表す単語が
06:03
or answers that cell phone, and all of a sudden we don't exist.
英語に新しく作られました
06:06
The word is "pizzled": it's a combination of puzzled and pissed off.
pizzledという単語です 「困った」と「イライラした」の組み合わせです
06:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:14
I think it's quite apt. It's our empathy, it's our tuning in
ぴったりですね 我々をマキャベリストや精神病質と
06:17
which separates us from Machiavellians or sociopaths.
区別するものは 共感できるかどうかです
06:24
I have a brother-in-law who's an expert on horror and terror --
私には恐怖の専門家である義理の兄弟がいます
06:27
he wrote the Annotated Dracula, the Essential Frankenstein --
ドラキュラやフランケンシュタインの本を執筆したことがあります
06:32
he was trained as a Chaucer scholar,
チョーサーの学者ですが
06:35
but he was born in Transylvania
トランシルバニア生まれということが
06:36
and I think it affected him a little bit.
多少なりとも影響を与えたのでしょう
06:38
At any rate, at one point my brother-in-law, Leonard,
ともかく 義兄弟のレオナルドはある時
06:40
decided to write a book about a serial killer.
連続殺人犯の本を書く事にしました
06:44
This is a man who terrorized the very vicinity we're in
何年も前に この近所を恐怖に陥れた男で
06:46
many years ago. He was known as the Santa Cruz strangler.
サンタクルズ絞殺魔として知られています
06:50
And before he was arrested, he had murdered his grandparents,
逮捕されるまでに その男は祖父母と
06:53
his mother and five co-eds at UC Santa Cruz.
母親と カリフォルニア大学サンタクルズ校の5人の女子学生を殺しました
06:57
So my brother-in-law goes to interview this killer
義兄弟が取材で
07:01
and he realizes when he meets him
その男に会った時
07:04
that this guy is absolutely terrifying.
極度の恐怖を感じました
07:06
For one thing, he's almost seven feet tall.
彼は身長が210cmもありました
07:08
But that's not the most terrifying thing about him.
しかしそれが彼の最も恐ろしいことではありません
07:10
The scariest thing is that his IQ is 160: a certified genius.
その男のIQは160もありました 紛れもない天才です
07:13
But there is zero correlation between IQ and emotional empathy,
しかしIQと共感性 つまり人の感情を読み取ることとの
07:19
feeling with the other person.
相関関係はゼロです
07:23
They're controlled by different parts of the brain.
この2つは脳の異なった領域が制御しています
07:25
So at one point, my brother-in-law gets up the courage
義兄弟はそのうちに 勇気を持って
07:28
to ask the one question he really wants to know the answer to,
一番聞きたかった質問を尋ねることにしました
07:31
and that is: how could you have done it?
それは「どうしてそういうことができたのか?」
07:33
Didn't you feel any pity for your victims?
「相手に哀れみを感じなかったのか?」
07:36
These were very intimate murders -- he strangled his victims.
彼は血縁関係にある人々を絞め殺したのです
07:38
And the strangler says very matter-of-factly,
絞殺犯は事も無げに言いました
07:42
"Oh no. If I'd felt the distress, I could not have done it.
「いや もし不快な気持ちを感じていたら そんなことはできなかった
07:44
I had to turn that part of me off. I had to turn that part of me off."
自分の中のそういう部分をオフにしたんだ」
07:49
And I think that that is very troubling,
これは非常に厄介なことです
07:55
and in a sense, I've been reflecting on turning that part of us off.
ある意味で 私はそのように自分の一部をオフにすることについて考えてきました
08:01
When we focus on ourselves in any activity,
もし私たちが何かに集中すると
08:05
we do turn that part of ourselves off if there's another person.
誰かがいても他人に気づく意識はオフになっている
08:08
Think about going shopping and think about the possibilities
買い物をする時に 思いやりのある消費をすることの
08:12
of a compassionate consumerism.
可能性を考えてみてください
08:17
Right now, as Bill McDonough has pointed out,
先ほど マクドノー氏が指摘したように
08:20
the objects that we buy and use have hidden consequences.
私たちが買ったり使ったりするものには見えない因果関係が働いています
08:24
We're all unwitting victims of a collective blind spot.
私たちは 皆 無意識のうちに被害者となっています
08:28
We don't notice and don't notice that we don't notice
カーペットやイスの布地が放つ有毒物質に
08:32
the toxic molecules emitted by a carpet or by the fabric on the seats.
注意を向けていません しかも注意を向けていないこと自体に注意をしていない
08:35
Or we don't know if that fabric is a technological
製品が化学的なものなのか
08:42
or manufacturing nutrient; it can be reused
自然のものなのか つまり再利用ができるのか
08:47
or does it just end up at landfill? In other words,
埋立地行きなのか
08:51
we're oblivious to the ecological and public health
つまり 買うもの 使うもののによって起こる
08:53
and social and economic justice consequences
生態系や公衆衛生 社会や経済への影響について
08:59
of the things we buy and use.
私たちは眼中にないのです
09:02
In a sense, the room itself is the elephant in the room,
自分の暮らす環境そのものに問題があるのに
09:06
but we don't see it. And we've become victims
その点にすら気がつかない私たちは
09:10
of a system that points us elsewhere. Consider this.
様々なところで指摘される仕組みの犠牲となっています
09:14
There's a wonderful book called
我々が使う日用品の裏事情が書かれた
09:18
Stuff: The Hidden Life of Everyday Objects.
素晴らしい本があります
09:22
And it talks about the back story of something like a t-shirt.
Tシャツなどの製品を取り上げています
09:25
And it talks about where the cotton was grown
綿の生産地や 使用されている化学肥料と
09:28
and the fertilizers that were used and the consequences
その土壌への影響も
09:31
for soil of that fertilizer. And it mentions, for instance,
取り上げています そして 例えば
09:33
that cotton is very resistant to textile dye;
綿は染色しにくいため
09:37
about 60 percent washes off into wastewater.
染料の60パーセントが排水として流れてしまう と指摘しています
09:40
And it's well known by epidemiologists that kids
疫学者により 織物工場の近くに住んでいる子どもの
09:43
who live near textile works tend to have high rates of leukemia.
白血病の比率が高まることがよく知られています
09:46
There's a company, Bennett and Company, that supplies Polo.com,
ラルフローレンやヴィクトリアシークレットに生地を卸している
09:52
Victoria's Secret -- they, because of their CEO, who's aware of this,
ベネット アンド カンパニーという会社があります この会社では
09:57
in China formed a joint venture with their dye works
この事実を知るCEOにより 地面に戻される前の排水が
10:03
to make sure that the wastewater
適切に処理されるように
10:07
would be properly taken care of before it returned to the groundwater.
中国に合弁企業を設立しました
10:09
Right now, we don't have the option to choose the virtuous t-shirt
今の時点では 社会的に適切な過程により製造されたTシャツと
10:13
over the non-virtuous one. So what would it take to do that?
そうでないTシャツを見分ける方法がありません どうすればいいのでしょうか?
10:18
Well, I've been thinking. For one thing,
私はこういうことを考えています
10:25
there's a new electronic tagging technology that allows any store
あらゆる店舗に 棚の商品がどのような過程を経ているのかを知る
10:28
to know the entire history of any item on the shelves in that store.
新しい電子タグ技術を導入することです
10:33
You can track it back to the factory. Once you can track it
その製品を工場までたどることができて 工場までたどったら
10:38
back to the factory, you can look at the manufacturing processes
その製品を作った製造過程を調べられて
10:40
that were used to make it, and if it's virtuous,
それが社会的に適切だったら 製品に
10:44
you can label it that way. Or if it's not so virtuous,
チェックをつけられます もしそうでなければ―
10:48
you can go into -- today, go into any store,
現在でも どのような店舗へ行っても
10:52
put your scanner on a palm onto a barcode,
携帯機器の読み取り部をバーコードへ当てれば
10:56
which will take you to a website.
その製品のWEBサイトを見られます
10:59
They have it for people with allergies to peanuts.
ピーナッツアレルギーの人の為に
11:01
That website could tell you things about that object.
そのサイトは 製品の情報を提供しています
11:04
In other words, at point of purchase,
つまり 購入する時に
11:07
we might be able to make a compassionate choice.
思いやりのある選択をすることができるということです
11:08
There's a saying in the world of information science:
情報科学でよく知られた言葉があります
11:12
ultimately everybody will know everything.
「結局は 誰もが全てを知ることになる」
11:18
And the question is: will it make a difference?
その結果 違いは生み出されるでしょうか?
11:21
Some time ago when I was working for The New York Times,
80年代に ニューヨーク タイムズで働いていた時に
11:25
it was in the '80s, I did an article
当時のニューヨークの新しい問題―
11:29
on what was then a new problem in New York --
路上のホームレスの人々について
11:31
it was homeless people on the streets.
記事を書きました
11:33
And I spent a couple of weeks going around with a social work agency
何週間か ホームレスを助ける社会福祉事業局の仕事に付き添い
11:35
that ministered to the homeless. And I realized seeing the homeless
ホームレスの人々を見て 彼らの目から
11:39
through their eyes that almost all of them were psychiatric patients
ほとんどのホームレスの人々は帰るところがない精神疾患の患者なのだと
11:42
that had nowhere to go. They had a diagnosis. It made me --
気づきました 彼らは症状を抱えていました
11:47
what it did was to shake me out of the urban trance where,
誰もがホームレスの人々を 視界の隅に
11:52
when we see, when we're passing someone who's homeless
ただ端の方で見ながら通り過ぎていくのを見て
11:56
in the periphery of our vision, it stays on the periphery.
「都会病」になっていた私でも動揺しました
11:59
We don't notice and therefore we don't act.
気づかないゆえに 行動を起こさないのです
12:04
One day soon after that -- it was a Friday -- at the end of the day,
そのすぐ後のある金曜日 仕事が終わって
12:09
I went down -- I was going down to the subway. It was rush hour
地下鉄に乗るために下へ降りていました ラッシュアワーだったので
12:14
and thousands of people were streaming down the stairs.
何千もの人々が階段に 流れ込んでいました
12:17
And all of a sudden as I was going down the stairs
階段を下っている時 脇でうなだれている
12:19
I noticed that there was a man slumped to the side,
男性がいることに 突然 気づきました
12:21
shirtless, not moving, and people were just stepping over him --
上半身は裸で 身動きもしていません そして人々は彼の上をただ乗り越えて歩いて行くだけです
12:24
hundreds and hundreds of people.
何百 何千もの人々が
12:29
And because my urban trance had been somehow weakened,
私の都会病は なぜか弱まっていたため
12:31
I found myself stopping to find out what was wrong.
気づけば 立ち止まって問題を解決しようとしていました
12:35
The moment I stopped, half a dozen other people
私が立ち止まると 6人もの人が
12:39
immediately ringed the same guy.
すぐにその男性の周りに集まりました
12:42
And we found out that he was Hispanic, he didn't speak any English,
彼はヒスパニックで 英語を話せず
12:44
he had no money, he'd been wandering the streets for days, starving,
お金もありませんでした 彼は通りを1日中さまよって 空腹で
12:46
and he'd fainted from hunger.
倒れてしまったのでしょう
12:51
Immediately someone went to get orange juice,
すぐに誰かがオレンジジュースを買いに行き
12:52
someone brought a hotdog, someone brought a subway cop.
誰かがホットドッグを持ってきて また誰かが警官を呼んできました
12:54
This guy was back on his feet immediately.
男性はすぐに立ち上がることができました
12:57
But all it took was that simple act of noticing,
全ては気づくという簡単な行動から起こったのです
13:00
and so I'm optimistic.
私はまだまだ楽観的でいます
13:05
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございます
13:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:07
Translated by Keisuke Kusunoki
Reviewed by Takako Sato

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Daniel Goleman - Psychologist
Daniel Goleman, psychologist and award-winning author of Emotional Intelligence and other books on EI, challenges traditional measures of intelligence as a predictor of life success.

Why you should listen

Daniel Goleman brought the notion of "EI" to prominence as an alternative to more traditional measures of IQ with his 1995 mega-best-seller Emotional Intelligence.

Since the publication of that book, conferences and academic institutes have sprung up dedicated to the idea. EI is taught in public schools, and corporate leaders have adopted it as a new way of thinking about success and leadership. EI, and one's "EIQ," can be an explanation of why some "average" people are incredibly successful, while "geniuses" sometimes fail to live up to their promise.

More profile about the speaker
Daniel Goleman | Speaker | TED.com