English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

Serious Play 2008

Tim Brown: Tales of creativity and play

ティム・ブラウン:創造性と遊び

Filmed
Views 1,917,610

2008年”まじめな遊び”カンファレンスで、デザイナーであるティム・ブラウンは家庭でも出来るいろいろなテスト(そのうちの1つについてはおそらくしない方がいいが…)の例を用いて創造的思考と遊びの間にある強力な関係性について説いています。

- Designer
Tim Brown is the CEO of the "innovation and design" firm IDEO -- taking an approach to design that digs deeper than the surface. Full bio

This is a guy named Bob McKim.
この男性はボブ マッキムという人で
00:16
He was a creativity researcher in the '60s and '70s,
60年代、70年代に創造性における研究者の一人でした
00:19
and also led the Stanford Design Program.
スタンフォード大学のデザインプログラムを率いた人物でもあります
00:24
And in fact, my friend and IDEO founder, David Kelley,
実はIDEOの創設者であり私の友達でもある
00:27
who’s out there somewhere, studied under him at Stanford.
デイビッド ケリーは――この会場にのどこかにいますが――彼もスタンフォードでマッキムの下で学んでいました
00:30
And he liked to do an exercise with his students
マッキムは学生と実習をするのが好きでした
00:36
where he got them to take a piece of paper
たとえば学生に一枚の紙を渡して
00:42
and draw the person who sat next to them, their neighbor,
隣に座っている人の絵を
00:47
very quickly, just as quickly as they could.
出来るだけ、早く書き上げるような実習です
00:51
And in fact, we’re going to do that exercise right now.
というか、今からその実習をあなた方にしていただきたいと思います
00:53
You all have a piece of cardboard and a piece of paper.
皆さん、厚紙と一枚の紙を持っていますよね
00:56
It’s actually got a bunch of circles on it.
たくさんの円のある
00:59
I need you to turn that piece of paper over;
それを裏返して
01:00
you should find that it’s blank on the other side.
裏面は真っ白になっているのでその面を使いましょう
01:01
And there should be a pencil.
鉛筆もありますよね
01:04
And I want you to pick somebody that’s seated next to you,
次に隣に座っている人を選んで
01:07
and when I say, go, you’ve got 30 seconds to draw your neighbor, OK?
私が「ゴー」と言ったら30秒以内にその人を描いてください。大丈夫ですか?
01:11
So, everybody ready? OK. Off you go.
準備はいいですか? OK, ゴー
01:19
You’ve got 30 seconds, you’d better be fast.
30秒以内ですよ。速く、速く
01:24
Come on: those masterpieces ...
ほら、傑作を描いてくださいよ
01:27
OK? Stop. All right, now.
OK? ストップです。それじゃあ
01:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:43
Yes, lot’s of laughter. Yeah, exactly.
はい、笑いが起きていますね。いいですね
01:45
Lots of laughter, quite a bit of embarrassment.
大きな笑いが起きていますね。ちょっと恥ずかしいでしょう?
01:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:51
Am I hearing a few "sorry’s"? I think I’m hearing a few sorry’s.
「ごめんなさい」もいくつか聞かれますかね?いや、絶対「ごめんなさい」って聞こえてきますよ
01:52
Yup, yup, I think I probably am.
はい、はい、やっぱり聞こえてます
01:57
And that’s exactly what happens every time,
そして、大人に対してこの実習をするときには
01:59
every time you do this with adults.
いつも必ず起こる現象です
02:03
McKim found this every time he did it with his students.
そしてマッキムが学生と実習をしたときにも、これが起きました
02:05
He got exactly the same response: lots and lots of sorry’s.
彼も全く同じ反応を目にしました:非常にたくさんの「ごめんなさい」です
02:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:12
And he would point this out as evidence
彼がこれによって示したのは
02:13
that we fear the judgment of our peers,
私達は仲間からの判断を恐れ
02:17
and that we’re embarrassed about showing our ideas
また、私達の周りの仲間に自分自身のアイデアを
02:20
to people we think of as our peers, to those around us.
話す事を恥ずかしく思ってしまうという事です
02:24
And this fear is what causes us
そして、その恐れは私達の考えを
02:28
to be conservative in our thinking.
保守的なものにしてしまうのです
02:32
So we might have a wild idea,
つまり、私達はどんな突飛なアイデアを持っていても
02:35
but we’re afraid to share it with anybody else.
それを他の人たちと共有することにおびえてしまっています
02:37
OK, so if you try the same exercise with kids,
ところが子供たちを相手に同じ実習をしてみると
02:40
they have no embarrassment at all.
子供たちは何も恥ずかしがりません
02:43
They just quite happily show their masterpiece
子供たちはとても楽しそうに描いた傑作を
02:46
to whoever wants to look at it.
周りの人みんなに見せるのです
02:48
But as they learn to become adults,
しかし、彼らが大人になるにつれて
02:53
they become much more sensitive to the opinions of others,
彼らはより他人の意見に敏感になってしまい
02:56
and they lose that freedom and they do start to become embarrassed.
その自由を失い、恥ずかしがるようになるのです
02:59
And in studies of kids playing, it’s been shown
子供の遊びについての研究で
03:04
time after time that kids who feel secure,
安心できて、そして信頼できる
03:07
who are in a kind of trusted environment --
環境に置かれた子供たちは
03:11
they’re the ones that feel most free to play.
より自由に遊ぶということが繰り返し示されています
03:14
And if you’re starting a design firm, let’s say,
つまり、たとえばもしあなたがデザイン会社を設立するとき
03:20
then you probably also want to create
あなたはもちろんそのような安心感のある
03:23
a place where people have the same kind of security.
職場環境をつくりたいですよね
03:27
Where they have the same kind of security to take risks.
リスクを冒しても大丈夫という安心感があること
03:30
Maybe have the same kind of security to play.
おそらく、遊んでもよいという安心感もです
03:33
Before founding IDEO, David said that what he wanted to do
IDEOを創設する前に、デイビッドは全ての従業員が自分の親友である
03:37
was to form a company where all the employees are my best friends.
という会社を設立したいと言っていました
03:42
Now, that wasn’t just self-indulgence.
それは決して、わがままなものではありません
03:48
He knew that friendship is a short cut to play.
彼は友情が遊ぶことへの近道だと知っていたのです
03:51
And he knew that it gives us a sense of trust,
そして、その友情が私達に信頼感をもたらし
03:57
and it allows us then to take the kind of creative risks
デザイナーとして冒さなくてならない創造的なリスクを
04:02
that we need to take as designers.
冒すことを容易にしてくれるのです
04:05
And so, that decision to work with his friends --
友達と一緒に働くという決断でIDEOは始められたのです
04:08
now he has 550 of them -- was what got IDEO started.
その友達も今では550人になりました
04:12
And our studios, like, I think, many creative workplaces today,
私達のスタジオや、他の多くの創造的な職場は
04:19
are designed to help people feel relaxed:
そこに働く人々がリラックスできるようにデザインされています
04:23
familiar with their surroundings,
慣れ親しんだものに囲まれ
04:26
comfortable with the people that they’re working with.
共に働く同僚と快適に働ける
04:29
It takes more than decor, but I think we’ve all seen that
それは装飾以上のものであり
04:33
creative companies do often have symbols in the workplace
クリエイティブな会社は多くの場合、遊ぶことを皆に思い起こさせる
04:36
that remind people to be playful,
シンボルを職場に持っており
04:41
and that it’s a permissive environment.
寛大な職場環境になっています
04:44
So, whether it’s this microbus meeting room
たとえばIDEOの建物内の
04:47
that we have in one our buildings at IDEO;
マイクロバスの会議室であったり
04:49
or at Pixar, where the animators work in wooden huts and decorated caves;
ピクサーのアニメーターの職場にある木造の小屋や装飾された小部屋
04:51
or at the Googleplex, where
もしくはGoogle本社は
04:57
it’s famous for its [beach] volleyball courts,
ビーチバレーコートや
04:59
and even this massive dinosaur skeleton with pink flamingos on it.
このピンクのフラミンゴの乗った大きな恐竜の骨格がある事で有名ですね
05:00
Don’t know the reason for the pink flamingos,
ピンクのフラミンゴの意味は全然わかりませんが…
05:04
but anyway, they’re there in the garden.
でもとにかく、Googleの中庭に置いてあります
05:06
Or even in the Swiss office of Google,
スイスのGoogleには
05:08
which perhaps has the most wacky ideas of all.
たぶん最も変ちくりんなシンボルがあります
05:10
And my theory is, that’s so the Swiss can prove
スイス支社の人たちは カリフォルニアの同僚に
05:12
to their Californian colleagues that they’re not boring.
自分たちはつまらなくないんだと示そうとしているんだと思います
05:14
So they have the slide, and they even have a fireman’s pole.
スイスGoogleには滑り台も、消防署のような滑り棒もあります
05:17
Don’t know what they do with that, but they have one.
それで何をするか分かりませんが
05:20
So all of these places have these symbols.
このような場所にはすべて、シンボルがあるのです
05:21
Now, our big symbol at IDEO is actually
そして、IDEOのシンボルは
05:24
not so much the place, it’s a thing.
場所というより、物です
05:27
And it’s actually something that we invented a few years ago,
これは私達が2,3年前に発明したというか
05:29
or created a few years ago.
創ったものです
05:32
It’s a toy; it’s called a "finger blaster."
それはおもちゃです。フィンガーブラスターと言います
05:33
And I forgot to bring one up with me.
私は持ってくるのを忘れてしまったので
05:36
So if somebody can reach under the chair that’s next to them,
どなたか、そこの席の下にあるものを取っていただけますか
05:38
you’ll find something taped underneath it.
そこに何かがテープで留めてあります
05:41
That’s great. If you could pass it up. Thanks, David, I appreciate it.
それです。もしそれを私に渡してくれたら… ありがとう
05:43
So this is a finger blaster, and you will find that every one of you
そう、これがフィンガーブラスターです。皆さんの椅子の下にも
05:46
has got one taped under your chair.
テープで留めてあります
05:50
And I’m going to run a little experiment. Another little experiment.
これからもう一つちょっとした実験をしてみたいと思います
05:53
But before we start, I need just to put these on.
でも始める前に、私にこれを着けさせてください
05:57
Thank you. All right.
ありがとう。大丈夫
06:00
Now, what I’m going to do is, I’m going to see how --
では、今から私がするのは…
06:02
I can’t see out of these, OK.
これ着けてたら見えないな。おっ見えた
06:05
I’m going to see how many of you at the back of the room
この部屋のどれだけの人が
06:06
can actually get those things onto the stage.
ステージまで飛ばせるか見たいのです
06:08
So the way they work is, you know,
フィンガーブラスターの使い方は
06:10
you just put your finger in the thing,
これに指を入れて
06:12
pull them back, and off you go.
後ろに引いて、放すだけです
06:15
So, don’t look backwards. That’s my only recommendation here.
後ろを振り向かないようにおすすめします
06:18
I want to see how many of you can get these things on the stage.
どれだけの人がここまで飛ばせるでしょう?
06:23
So come on! There we go, there we go. Thank you. Thank you. Oh.
さあどうぞ。いい感じ、いい感じ。ありがとう。ありがとう
06:25
I have another idea. I wanted to -- there we go.
あっ!いいこと思いついた。こうしたら……いい感じだね
06:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:31
There we go.
いいね
06:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:36
Thank you, thank you, thank you.
ありがとう。ありがとう
06:40
Not bad, not bad. No serious injuries so far.
悪くないね。今のところ死傷者は出ていません
06:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:45
Well, they’re still coming in from the back there;
まだ後ろの方から飛んできてますね
06:49
they’re still coming in.
まだ、ステージまで飛んでくる
06:54
Some of you haven’t fired them yet.
まだ何人かは発射してないですね
06:55
Can you not figure out how to do it, or something?
発射の仕方がわからないなんて事は無いですよね
06:56
It’s not that hard. Most of your kids figure out how to do this
そんなに難しくないですよ。大抵の子供たちは
06:58
in the first 10 seconds, when they pick it up.
手に取って10秒ほどで使い方をマスターしますから
07:01
All right. This is pretty good; this is pretty good.
これはかなり良いね。本当に良い感じです
07:04
Okay, all right. Let’s -- I suppose we'd better...
じゃあ。それじゃあとりあえず
07:06
I'd better clear these up out of the way;
少し片付けておかないと
07:12
otherwise, I’m going to trip over them.
踏んで転びそうです
07:13
All right. So the rest of you can save them
よし大丈夫。まだ持っている人は
07:15
for when I say something particularly boring,
私が何かつまらないことを言った時に
07:18
and then you can fire at me.
発射してください
07:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:21
All right. I think I’m going to take these off now,
眼鏡はもういらないですね
07:23
because I can’t see a damn thing when I’ve -- all right, OK.
これを着けているとほんとに前が見えにくくて、よし大丈夫だ
07:24
So, ah, that was fun.
はぁ、楽しかった
07:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:32
All right, good.
よし
07:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:36
So, OK, so why?
なぜこれが必要なんでしょう?
07:38
So we have the finger blasters. Other people have dinosaurs, you know.
私達はフィンガーブラスターを持っていて、他には恐竜がいる
07:40
Why do we have them? Well, as I said,
なぜこのようなシンボルが必要なのでしょうか?
07:43
we have them because we think maybe playfulness is important.
なぜなら私達は遊ぶ心は重要だと考えているからです
07:45
But why is it important?
ではなぜ重要なのか?
07:49
We use it in a pretty pragmatic way, to be honest.
正直に言って私達はそれを実用的な形で用いています
07:51
We think playfulness helps us get to better creative solutions.
私達は遊ぶ事でより創造的な解決法を見いだす事が出来ると考えています
07:54
Helps us do our jobs better,
私達の仕事をより良くし
07:59
and helps us feel better when we do them.
仕事するのを快適にしてくれるのです
08:01
Now, an adult encountering a new situation --
大人が新しい状況に直面すると…
08:03
when we encounter a new situation we have a tendency
私達は新しい状況に直面したとき
08:07
to want to categorize it just as quickly as we can, you know.
出来るだけ早くそれを分類する傾向にあります
08:10
And there’s a reason for that: we want to settle on an answer.
そして、それにはある理由があります。私達は答えを見出したいのです
08:13
Life’s complicated; we want to figure out
人生は複雑であり、身の回りに起こっている事を
08:19
what’s going on around us very quickly.
素早く理解したい
08:22
I suspect, actually, that the evolutionary biologists
私が思うに、進化生物学者はおそらく
08:23
probably have lots of reasons [for] why we want
人間がなぜ物事をこんなに
08:25
to categorize new things very, very quickly.
分類したがるのかという理由を多く知っているでしょう
08:27
One of them might be, you know,
その理由の一つとして
08:30
when we see this funny stripy thing:
縞模様のものを見たら
08:32
is that a tiger just about to jump out and kill us?
それは自分に襲いかかって殺しにかかっている虎か
08:33
Or is it just some weird shadows on the tree?
木のただ面白い形の影か
08:36
We need to figure that out pretty fast.
そのような事をすぐに判断しなくてはなりません
08:37
Well, at least, we did once.
かつてはそうでしたが
08:39
Most of us don’t need to anymore, I suppose.
私達の多くはもうそんな事はしなくてもいい
08:40
This is some aluminum foil, right? You use it in the kitchen.
これはアルミホイルですよね。台所で使うもの
08:42
That’s what it is, isn’t it? Of course it is, of course it is.
そういうものですよね。もちろん
08:44
Well, not necessarily.
でも、必ずしもそうでないんです
08:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:49
Kids are more engaged with open possibilities.
子供たちはより広い可能性を見いだすことが出来るのです
08:51
Now, they’ll certainly -- when they come across something new,
彼らが新しいものに出くわした時は
08:54
they’ll certainly ask, "What is it?"
確かに「これって何?」という疑問を持ちます
08:56
Of course they will. But they’ll also ask, "What can I do with it?"
しかしそれだけでなく、「これで何ができるんだろう?」とも思う
08:58
And you know, the more creative of them
より創造的な子供は
09:01
might get to a really interesting example.
もっと興味深い使い方にたどり着くでしょう
09:03
And this openness is the beginning of exploratory play.
この開放性が探索的な遊びの始まりなのです
09:06
Any parents of young kids in the audience? There must be some.
幼いお子さんのいる方は?何人かはいらっしゃるでしょう
09:11
Yeah, thought so. So we’ve all seen it, haven’t we?
ほら。ではご覧になっているでしょう?
09:14
We’ve all told stories about how, on Christmas morning,
クリスマスの朝に、私達の子供が
09:17
our kids end up playing with the boxes
もらったおもちゃより、最終的に
09:20
far more than they play with the toys that are inside them.
それが入っていた箱でより楽しんでいることがあります
09:22
And you know, from an exploration perspective,
探索的な観点から
09:25
this behavior makes complete sense.
この行動は、完全に理にかなっています
09:29
Because you can do a lot more with boxes than you can do with a toy.
おもちゃよりも箱の方が多くの遊び方が出来るからです
09:31
Even one like, say, Tickle Me Elmo --
「くすぐりエルモ」のようなおもちゃは
09:34
which, despite its ingenuity, really only does one thing,
その精巧さに関わらず、出来ることは一つだけです
09:37
whereas boxes offer an infinite number of choices.
一方で箱で遊ぶ方法は幾通りもあるのです
09:40
So again, this is another one of those playful activities
これもまた、私達が大人になるにつれて
09:47
that, as we get older, we tend to forget and we have to relearn.
忘れてしまい、学び直さなくてはならない遊びの一つなのです
09:49
So another one of Bob McKim’s favorite exercises
ボブ マッキムのもう一つのお気に入りの実習は
09:54
is called the "30 Circles Test."
「30の円テスト」です
09:57
So we’re back to work. You guys are going to get back to work again.
もう一度作業に戻りましょう。もう一度実習を始めますよ
09:58
Turn that piece of paper that you did the sketch on
さっきスケッチをした紙を裏返してみると
10:01
back over, and you’ll find those 30 circles printed on the piece of paper.
30個の円が紙に書いてありますよね
10:03
So it should look like this. You should be looking at something like this.
こんな風な紙を持っているはずです
10:07
So what I’m going to do is, I’m going to give you minute,
私が今から皆さんに時間を与えますので
10:09
and I want you to adapt as many of those circles as you can
出来る限り多くの円を
10:12
into objects of some form.
何かに変えてほしいのです
10:15
So for example, you could turn one into a football,
例えば、サッカーボールにもできますし
10:17
or another one into a sun. All I’m interested in is quantity.
太陽にだって変えられます。質より量です
10:19
I want you to do as many of them as you can,
これから少し時間をあげますので
10:22
in the minute that I’m just about to give you.
出来るだけ多くの円を変えてください
10:25
So, everybody ready? OK? Off you go.
皆さん準備はいいですか?では、始め
10:28
Okay. Put down your pencils, as they say.
はい、鉛筆を置いてください
10:46
So, who got more than five circles figured out?
では、5個以上できた人は?
10:50
Hopefully everybody? More than 10?
おそらく皆さんでしょう。では10個以上?
10:53
Keep your hands up if you did 10.
10個作った人は、手を挙げてくださいね
10:55
15? 20? Anybody get all 30?
15個?20個?30個全部の人?
10:57
No? Oh! Somebody did. Fantastic.
うおっ!出来た人がいますね。素晴らしい
11:00
Did anybody to a variation on a theme? Like a smiley face?
何かのテーマに沿ってやった人は? 例えばニコニコ顔に
11:03
Happy face? Sad face? Sleepy face? Anybody do that?
喜んだ顔、悲しい顔、眠たげな顔と言う具合に…誰かいますか?
11:08
Anybody use my examples? The sun and the football?
私の例を使った人は?太陽とかサッカーボールとか?
11:13
Great. Cool. So I was really interested in quantity.
素晴らしい。ここでは量が重要で
11:17
I wasn’t actually very interested in whether they were all different.
実際1つ1つが違っていることは求めていません
11:21
I just wanted you to fill in as many circles as possible.
出来るだけ多く円をただ埋めてほしかっただけなのです
11:24
And one of the things we tend to do as adults, again, is we edit things.
大人になってやるようになるのは、編集です
11:27
We stop ourselves from doing things.
自分で何かするのを止める
11:32
We self-edit as we’re having ideas.
アイデアが浮かんでも自己検閲してしまう
11:33
And in some cases, our desire to be original is actually a form of editing.
そして、多くの場合、私達がオリジナルでありたいと思う願望も、実際はその編集の一端なのです
11:35
And that actually isn’t necessarily really playful.
実際これはそんなに遊びのように見えないかもしれません
11:41
So that ability just to go for it and explore lots of things,
頑張ってやってみて、多くのことを
11:45
even if they don’t seem that different from each other,
例え互いにそう違ったものでなくても
11:50
is actually something that kids do well, and it is a form of play.
探求するという能力は子供たちの長けている点で、それは一種の遊びなのです
11:52
So now, Bob McKim did another
さて、ボブ マッキムは1960年代に
11:58
version of this test
これの別バージョンで
12:00
in a rather famous experiment that was done in the 1960s.
少し有名な実験を行いました
12:01
Anybody know what this is? It’s the peyote cactus.
これが何だか分かりますか?これはペヨーテサボテンと呼ばれる植物です
12:05
It’s the plant from which you can create mescaline,
この植物からはメスカリンと呼ばれる
12:10
one of the psychedelic drugs.
幻覚作用をもつ成分が抽出されます
12:12
For those of you around in the '60s, you probably know it well.
60年代を知っている方ならご存知でしょう
12:14
McKim published a paper in 1966, describing an experiment
マッキムは仲間と共に行った薬物の創造性への影響に関する
12:15
that he and his colleagues conducted
実験について
12:21
to test the effects of psychedelic drugs on creativity.
論文を1966年に発表しました
12:22
So he picked 27 professionals -- they were
彼は様々な分野の専門家27人を選びました
12:26
engineers, physicists, mathematicians, architects,
エンジニア、物理学者、数学者、建築家
12:33
furniture designers even, artists --
家具デザイナー、アーティストなどです
12:35
and he asked them to come along one evening,
ある晩に彼らを集め
12:38
and to bring a problem with them that they were working on.
彼らが取り組んでいる課題を持ってきてもらいました
12:41
He gave each of them some mescaline,
マッキムは被験者にメスカリンを与え
12:48
and had them listen to some nice, relaxing music for a while.
少しの間、リラックス出来る音楽を聞いてもらいました
12:50
And then he did what’s called the Purdue Creativity Test.
そこで彼はいわゆるパーデュー クリエイティビティ テストと呼ばれるテストを行いました
12:54
You might know it as, "How many uses can you find for a paper clip?"
例えば、ペーパークリップの他の使用法をいくつ考えつくか?などです
13:00
It’s basically the same thing as the 30 circles thing that I just had you do.
先ほど行った、「30の円テスト」と基本的には同じテストです
13:03
Now, actually, he gave the test before the drugs
彼は、薬物服用前と
13:07
and after the drugs, to see
服用後にそれぞれテストを行い
13:09
what the difference was in people’s
被験者の
13:13
facility and speed with coming up with ideas.
アイデアの発想力とスピード違いを調べました
13:15
And then he asked them to go away
その後、彼らに
13:18
and work on those problems that they’d brought.
持ってきた課題に取り組むように言いました
13:19
And they’d come up with a bunch of
彼らは自分の課題に対し興味深く
13:23
interesting solutions -- and actually, quite
同時に有効なアイデアを
13:25
valid solutions -- to the things that they’d been working on.
たくさん思いつきました
13:27
And so, some of the things that they figured out,
彼らが思いついたことの
13:30
some of these individuals figured out;
例をいくつか挙げましょう
13:31
in one case, a new commercial building and designs for houses
新しい商業ビルと住宅のデザインは実際にクライアントに
13:33
that were accepted by clients;
受け入れられました
13:36
a design of a solar space probe experiment;
太陽探査実験のデザイン
13:37
a redesign of the linear electron accelerator;
線形電子加速器のリデザイン
13:41
an engineering improvement to a magnetic tape recorder --
テープレコーダーの技術的改良
13:46
you can tell this is a while ago;
少し昔のことだと分かりますね
13:48
the completion of a line of furniture;
家具の生産プロセスの設計
13:49
and even a new conceptual model of the photon.
光量子における新しい概念モデルに至るまで
13:53
So it was a pretty successful evening.
この夕べは大成功でした
13:56
In fact, maybe this experiment was the reason that Silicon Valley
もしかすると、この実験はシリコンバレーがイノベーションによって
13:58
got off to its great start with innovation.
躍進したことに関係があるのかもしれません
14:02
We don’t know, but it may be.
誰も分かりませんが
14:05
We need to ask some of the CEOs
CEOたちにこの実験に
14:06
whether they were involved in this mescaline experiment.
参加したかどうか聞かなくてはいけませんね
14:07
But really, it wasn’t the drugs that were important;
しかし、ここで薬物自体は重要ではありません
14:09
it was this idea that what the drugs did
薬物はただ
14:13
would help shock people out of their normal way of thinking,
彼らが普段の考え方から抜け出す助けをしたのです
14:14
and getting them to forget the adult behaviors
そして、アイデアの発想を邪魔する
14:17
that were getting in the way of their ideas.
大人の振る舞いを忘れさせたのです
14:21
But it’s hard to break our habits, our adult habits.
しかし、私達の習慣、つまり大人の習慣を変えることは非常に難しいものです
14:24
At IDEO we have brainstorming rules written on the walls.
IDEOでは、私達はブレインストーミングのルールが壁に書いてあります
14:28
Edicts like, "Defer judgment," or "Go for quantity."
例えば、「判断を控える」であるとか「量を求めよ」などです
14:32
And somehow that seems wrong.
変に見えるかもしれません
14:36
I mean, can you have rules about creativity?
創造性にそもそもルールなんてあるのか?
14:37
Well, it sort of turns out that we need rules
しかし、古いルールや規範が
14:39
to help us break the old rules and norms
私たちの創造プロセスに入り込むのを防ぐためには
14:41
that otherwise we might bring to the creative process.
ルールが必要だということが分かりました
14:44
And we’ve certainly learnt that over time,
私達が学んだのは
14:48
you get much better brainstorming,
ルールに沿って遊ぶことで
14:49
much more creative outcomes when everybody does play by the rules.
ブレインストーミングも創造的な結果も、ずっと良いものになるということです
14:51
Now, of course, many designers, many individual designers,
もちろん、多くのデザイナーは
14:57
achieve this is in a much more organic way.
もっと緩やかな形でこれを行っています
15:00
I think the Eameses are wonderful examples of experimentation.
実験ということに関してイームズは素晴らしい例です
15:02
And they experimented with plywood for many years
彼らは長い間、はっきりとした目標を持たずして
15:07
without necessarily having one single goal in mind.
ベニヤ板で実験を繰り返しました
15:10
They were exploring following what was interesting to them.
彼らは興味深いと思うものを探求してきたのです
15:13
They went from designing splints for wounded soldiers
彼らは第二次世界大戦か朝鮮戦争時の
15:17
coming out of World War II and the Korean War, I think,
負傷した兵士のための添え木をデザインした経験から
15:19
and from this experiment they moved on to chairs.
椅子へと着想を移していったのです
15:22
Through constant experimentation with materials,
素材の実験を絶えず続ける中で
15:24
they developed a wide range of iconic solutions
私たちが今日知っている独特な製品を広く開発し
15:26
that we know today, eventually resulting in,
最終的には、あの伝説的な―
15:29
of course, the legendary lounge chair.
ラウンジチェアを生んだのです
15:31
Now, if the Eameses had stopped with that first great solution,
もしイームズがその最初の素晴らしいアイデアに満足してしまっていたら
15:33
then we wouldn’t be the beneficiaries of so many
私達は今日の多くの見事なデザインの
15:36
wonderful designs today.
恩恵を得ることが出来なかったでしょう
15:39
And of course, they used experimentation in all aspects of their work,
そして、彼らはどんな場面でも実験を用いました
15:42
from films to buildings, from games to graphics.
建物から映画、グラフィックスからゲームにいたるまで
15:46
So, they’re great examples, I think, of exploration
それらは、デザインにおける探索と実験の
15:52
and experimentation in design.
実例そのものです
15:56
Now, while the Eameses were exploring those possibilities,
イームズは、ああいった可能性を探索していた一方で
15:58
they were also exploring physical objects.
物質的なものも探索していたのです
16:01
And they were doing that through building prototypes.
プロトタイプを組み立てることで常に探索をしました
16:04
And building is the next of the behaviors that I thought I’d talk about.
そしてこの組み立てるという行動について、次にお話しします
16:07
So the average Western first-grader
ヨーロッパの平均的な1年生は
16:12
spends as much as 50 percent of their play time
遊び時間の50%を
16:14
taking part in what’s called "construction play."
何かを作る遊びに費やします
16:17
Construction play -- it’s playful, obviously,
作る遊びというのは、もちろん遊びですが
16:20
but also a powerful way to learn.
同時に学習において非常に有効なツールです
16:23
When play is about building a tower out of blocks,
積み木でタワーを組み立てるとき
16:25
the kid begins to learn a lot about towers.
子供はタワーについて多くを学びます
16:30
And as they repeatedly knock it down and start again,
崩しては作り直すのを何度も繰り返す中で
16:32
learning is happening as a sort of by-product of play.
遊びの副産物の様なものとして学習が行われます
16:34
It’s classically learning by doing.
それは典型的な行動による学習なのです
16:38
Now, David Kelley calls this behavior,
さて、デザイナーが
16:42
when it’s carried out by designers, "thinking with your hands."
この行動をとるとき、デイビッド ケリーは「手で考えている」と言います
16:43
And it typically involves making multiple,
そこでは通常完成度の低いプロトタイプを
16:47
low-resolution prototypes very quickly,
短時間にたくさん組み立てます
16:50
often by bringing lots of found elements together
手元にある要素を継ぎ合わせることで
16:53
in order to get to a solution.
たびたび解決法にたどり着くのです
16:55
On one of his earliest projects, the team was kind of stuck,
彼の最初のころのプロジェクトの一つで、チームは行き詰まり
16:58
and they came up with a mechanism by hacking together
彼らはロールオン式のデオドラントから
17:02
a prototype made from a roll-on deodorant.
プロトタイプを作り出しました
17:06
Now, that became the first commercial computer mouse
そして、それはAppleのリサとマッキントッシュの
17:09
for the Apple Lisa and the Macintosh.
最初の商用のマウスとなったのです
17:11
So, they learned their way to that by building prototypes.
彼らはプロトタイプにより、このデバイスを生み出す方法を思いついたのです
17:13
Another example is a group of designers
その他の例として、外科医と共に
17:19
who were working on a surgical instrument with some surgeons.
手術器具の開発に携わったデザイナーのグループです
17:21
They were meeting with them; they were talking to the surgeons
彼らは外科医たちと会って、外科医たちに
17:24
about what it was they needed with this device.
この器具に何が必要か尋ねました
17:26
And one of the designers ran out of the room
一人のデザイナーが部屋を出て行き
17:29
and grabbed a white board marker and a film canister --
ホワイトボードマーカーとフィルム容器
17:31
which is now becoming a very precious prototyping medium --
――今ではかえって希少な素材かもしれませんが
17:34
and a clothespin. He taped them all together,
その二つと更に洗濯バサミをテープでくっつけ
17:37
ran back into the room and said, "You mean, something like this?"
「こんなようなものですか」と聞いたのです
17:39
And the surgeons grabbed hold of it and said,
そして外科医はそれを手にとり
17:41
well, I want to hold it like this, or like that.
「私はこれをこうしたいんだ、もしくはこんな感じ」
17:43
And all of a sudden a productive conversation
手に取れるものを巡って
17:45
was happening about design around a tangible object.
急にデザインについての生産的な会話が活発に行われるようになったのです
17:47
And in the end it turned into a real device.
そして最後には実際に医療器具となったのです
17:52
And so this behavior is all about quickly getting something
この行動は素早く何かを実際に作ってみて
17:56
into the real world, and having your thinking advanced as a result.
結果として考えを前進させるのです
17:59
At IDEO there’s a kind of a back-to-preschool feel
IDEOの職場環境には幼稚園に戻ったような
18:04
sometimes about the environment.
雰囲気があります
18:07
The prototyping carts, filled with colored paper
プロトタイピングの道具箱には色のついた紙や
18:09
and Play-Doh and glue sticks and stuff --
粘土やスティックのりとかでいっぱいです
18:12
I mean, they do have a bit of a kindergarten feel to them.
つまり、それらは何かしら幼稚園の感覚を生み出すのです
18:15
But the important idea is that everything’s at hand, everything’s around.
しかし、重要なのは全てが手の届く位置にあることです
18:18
So when designers are working on ideas,
デザイナーがアイデアを練っているとき
18:22
they can start building stuff whenever they want.
いつでも何かを作り始めることが出来るのです
18:24
They don’t necessarily even have to go
それらは必ずしも
18:27
into some kind of formal workshop to do it.
ちゃんとした作業部屋に行く必要はないのです
18:28
And we think that’s pretty important.
私達はこれがとても重要だと考えています
18:30
And then the sad thing is, although preschools
しかし悲しいことに
18:32
are full of this kind of stuff, as kids go through the school system
幼稚園ではこのような道具でいっぱいなのに、教育システムを進むにつれて
18:34
it all gets taken away.
それらは無くなっていくのです
18:38
They lose this stuff that facilitates
遊び形式、組み立て形式の考え方を
18:40
this sort of playful and building mode of thinking.
促進するこれらの道具を、子供たちは失ってしまうのです
18:42
And of course, by the time you get to the average workplace,
そうして、平均的な職場に就く頃には
18:47
maybe the best construction tool we have
私達にとって一番いい作るための道具は
18:49
might be the Post-it notes. It’s pretty barren.
Post-itノートになるのでしょう。これは味気ない
18:52
But by giving project teams and the clients
プロジェクトチームとクライアントが一緒になって
18:55
who they’re working with permission to think with their hands,
手で考えることによって
18:59
quite complex ideas can spring into life
複雑なアイデアでも輝きだし
19:01
and go right through to execution much more easily.
より容易に結果として生み出されるのです
19:06
This is a nurse using a very simple -- as you can see -- plasticine prototype,
この看護婦さんは、見て分かるように簡単な粘土のプロトタイプを作り
19:10
explaining what she wants out of a portable information system
病院で彼女と共に取り組む
19:14
to a team of technologists and designers
技術者とデザイナーのチームに
19:17
that are working with her in a hospital.
携帯情報システムに望むものを説明しています
19:20
And just having this very simple prototype
このシンプルなプロトで
19:23
allows her to talk about what she wants in a much more powerful way.
彼女が望むものをとても説得力のある形で話せるようになったのです
19:24
And of course, by building quick prototypes,
素早くプロトタイプを組み立てることで
19:29
we can get out and test our ideas with consumers
言葉で説明するより遥かに効率的に
19:31
and users much more quickly
消費者やユーザーと私達のアイデアを
19:34
than if we’re trying to describe them through words.
テストすることが出来るようになるのです
19:36
But what about designing something that isn’t physical?
では、物質的でないものをデザインする時はどうなのか?
19:42
Something like a service or an experience?
例えば、サービスであったり、エクスペリエンスや
19:45
Something that exists as a series of interactions over time?
長時間にわたる一連のやり取りなどはどうでしょう?
19:47
Instead of building play, this can be approached with role-play.
組み立てる遊びのかわりに、ロールプレイをすることで取り組むことが出来ます
19:50
So, if you’re designing an interaction between two people --
例えば、ファストフード店で注文をするという
19:56
such as, I don’t know -- ordering food at a fast food joint
2人の間の相互関係をデザインする場合
19:58
or something, you need to be able to imagine
そのエクスペリエンスは時間の経過の中で
20:01
how that experience might feel over a period of time.
どのように感じられるかを想像する必要があります
20:03
And I think the best way to achieve that,
これを実現し、デザインに存在する
20:06
and get a feeling for any flaws in your design, is to act it out.
欠陥を経験するには、ロールプレイするのが最善だと考えています
20:08
So we do quite a lot of work at IDEO
IDEOでは多くの仕事で
20:13
trying to convince our clients of this.
このやり方をクライアントに認めてもらっています
20:15
They can be a little skeptical; I’ll come back to that.
彼らはすこし懐疑的ですが、それは後に話しましょう
20:17
But a place, I think, where the effort is really worthwhile
しかし私が思うに、人々が難題に立ち向かっている環境でこそ
20:19
is where people are wrestling with quite serious problems --
その試みの価値生まれるのです
20:23
things like education or security or finance or health.
例えば、教育、セキュリティ、金融、医療などが挙げられます
20:27
And this is another example in a healthcare environment
これは、ヘルスケア分野における別の例ですが
20:32
of some doctors and some nurses and designers
患者に対するサービスにおいて
20:35
acting out a service scenario around patient care.
医者と看護婦、そしてデザイナーが実際に演じています
20:37
But you know, many adults
しかし、大人の多くは
20:41
are pretty reluctant to engage with role-play.
ロールプレイにほとんど気乗りしません
20:42
Some of it’s embarrassment and some of it is because
恥ずかしさのためもあるし
20:45
they just don’t believe that what emerges is necessarily valid.
これを通して、浮かび上がる事実が有効であると信じていないからでしょう
20:47
They dismiss an interesting interaction by saying,
ロールプレイだからそうなっただけだと言って
20:51
you know, "That’s just happening because they’re acting it out."
興味深い相互作用を否定してしまう
20:53
Research into kids' behavior actually suggests
子供の行動に関する研究は
20:56
that it’s worth taking role-playing seriously.
ロールプレイに真剣に取り組むことが重要であることを示しています
20:58
Because when children play a role,
子供たちが役を演じるとき
21:01
they actually follow social scripts quite closely
彼らは大人から学び取った社会的な台本に
21:02
that they’ve learnt from us as adults.
忠実に従って振る舞います
21:05
If one kid plays "store," and another one’s playing "house,"
一人が「お店ごっこ」、もう一人が「ままごと」をしていたら
21:07
then the whole kind of play falls down.
この遊びは失敗に陥りますが
21:10
So they get used to quite quickly
彼らはすぐに
21:13
to understanding the rules for social interactions,
社会的な相互関係のルールを理解し
21:16
and are actually quite quick to point out when they’re broken.
それらが崩れた時にはすぐ指摘するのです
21:20
So when, as adults, we role-play,
私達大人がロールプレイするときには
21:23
then we have a huge set of these scripts already internalized.
既に吸収している膨大なスクリプトを持っています
21:26
We’ve gone through lots of experiences in life,
私達は人生において色んなことを経験しています
21:31
and they provide a strong intuition
その様々な経験から私達は相互関係がきちんと
21:33
as to whether an interaction is going to work.
成り立つかどうかを直感的に知ることが出来るのです
21:36
So we’re very good, when acting out a solution,
解決策を演じてみるとき
21:39
at spotting whether something lacks authenticity.
私達は欠けている何かを見つけることに長けているのです
21:41
So role-play is actually, I think,
つまり、ロールプレイとは
21:46
quite valuable when it comes to thinking about experiences.
エクスペリエンスについて考える際にその価値を発揮します
21:47
Another way for us, as designers, to explore role-play
私達デザイナーがロールプレイで探索するもう1つの方法は
21:51
is to put ourselves through an experience which we’re designing for,
自分たちのデザインしているエクスペリエンスの中に身を置いて
21:54
and project ourselves into an experience.
自ら体験するということです
21:58
So here are some designers who are trying to understand
これはデザイナーが飛行機内の
22:01
what it might feel like to sleep in a
限られたスペースで寝てみるとどのように感じるか
22:03
confined space on an airplane.
理解しようとしています
22:06
And so they grabbed some very simple materials, you can see,
見ての通り単純な材料しか使っていません
22:08
and did this role-play, this kind of very crude role-play,
このようなとても大雑把なロールプレイによって
22:10
just to get a sense of what it would be like for passengers
乗客が飛行機の狭い場所に
22:14
if they were stuck in quite small places on airplanes.
詰め込まれた時に、どのように感じているのか知ることができます
22:16
This is one of our designers, Kristian Simsarian,
IDEOのデザイナーであるクリスチャン シムサリアンは
22:21
and he’s putting himself through the experience of being an ER patient.
救急医療室の患者の体験を自身で経験しようとしています
22:23
Now, this is a real hospital, in a real emergency room.
ここは本物の病院の本物の救急医療室です
22:27
One of the reasons he chose to take
彼がこの大きめのビデオカメラを
22:29
this rather large video camera with him was
持った理由の一つとして
22:31
because he didn’t want the doctors and nurses thinking
彼は医者と看護婦に
22:32
he was actually sick, and sticking something into him
自分が本当に病気だと思われ、変なものを突っ込まれて
22:34
that he was going to regret later.
後悔したくはなかったからです
22:37
So anyhow, he went there with his video camera,
何にせよ彼はビデオカメラを持ってあの場に行き
22:39
and it’s kind of interesting to see what he brought back.
その持ち帰った映像を見てみると興味深いものでした
22:42
Because when we looked at the video when he got back,
なぜかというとその映像には
22:46
we saw 20 minutes of this.
20分間この状態だったからです
22:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
22:50
And also, the amazing thing about this video --
このビデオが素晴らしいのは
22:53
as soon as you see it you immediately
見ればすぐにこの体験に
22:56
project yourself into that experience.
身を置くことができることです
22:58
And you know what it feels like: all of that uncertainty
病院の廊下で待たされて
23:01
while you’re left out in the hallway
部屋で医者が別の緊急を要する
23:03
while the docs are dealing with some more urgent case
患者に対処している間に
23:05
in one of the emergency rooms, wondering what the heck’s going on.
いったい何が起こっているのか不安を感じることも分かります
23:07
And so this notion of using role-play --
ロールプレイというのは
23:11
or in this case, living through the experience
このケースでは実体験していますが、共感を生み出す方法として
23:13
as a way of creating empathy --
とても強力です
23:16
particularly when you use video, is really powerful.
特にビデオを使えばとても効果的です
23:17
Or another one of our designers, Altay Sendil:
IDEOのデザイナーの
23:20
he’s here having his chest waxed, not because he’s very vain,
オルテイ センディルが
23:22
although actually he is -- no, I’m kidding --
ワックスによる胸のむだ毛処理をしていますが
23:25
but in order to empathize with the pain that chronic care patients
これは長期療養者が包帯を取るときに感じる痛みを
23:27
go through when they’re having dressings removed.
共感するために行ったのです
23:31
And so sometimes these analogous experiences,
そしてこのような実体験や
23:33
analogous role-play, can also be quite valuable.
ロールプレイはとても有益なのです
23:36
So when a kid dresses up as a firefighter, you know,
例えば子供が消防士の格好をすれば
23:39
he’s beginning to try on that identity.
そのアイデンティティに近づこうとします
23:42
He wants to know what it feels like to be a firefighter.
消防士になったらどんな風に感じるか知りたいのです
23:44
We’re doing the same thing as designers.
デザイナーとして私たちも同様のことを行ない
23:47
We’re trying on these experiences.
このような体験を試してみます
23:49
And so the idea of role-play is both as an empathy tool,
つまりロールプレイとはプロトタイピングのためのツールというだけでなく
23:51
as well as a tool for prototyping experiences.
感情移入のためのツールでもあるのです
23:55
And you know, we kind of admire people who do this at IDEO anyway.
IDEOでは彼らのような仲間を賞賛しています
23:59
Not just because they lead to insights about the experience,
彼らが体験についての洞察をもたらしてくれるからだけでなく
24:04
but also because of their willingness to explore
彼らの探索したいという意欲や
24:07
and their ability to unselfconsciously
意識せずに自分たちの身をその体験に
24:10
surrender themselves to the experience.
任せることができる能力があるからです
24:13
In short, we admire their willingness to play.
つまり私達は彼らの遊ぶ意欲を賞賛しているのです
24:16
Playful exploration, playful building and role-play:
だから遊びのような探索、組立て、そしてロールプレイというのがありますが
24:21
those are some of the ways that designers use play in their work.
これらはデザイナーが仕事において用いる遊びなのです
24:27
And so far, I admit, this might feel
ただ外に行って子供のように遊びなさいという
24:30
like it’s a message just to go out and play like a kid.
メッセージに聞こえてしまうかもしれませんし
24:34
And to certain extent it is, but I want to stress a couple of points.
ある程度その通りですが、しかし言いたいことが2つほどあります
24:37
The first thing to remember is that play is not anarchy.
一つ目は遊びは無秩序ではないということ
24:41
Play has rules, especially when it’s group play.
遊びにはルールがあり、特にグループでの遊びではそれは重要です
24:44
When kids play tea party, or they play cops and robbers,
子供がおままごとをしたり、ドロ警(泥棒と警察に別れてする遊び)などをするとき
24:49
they’re following a script that they’ve agreed to.
彼らは同意した規則に従って遊んでいます
24:53
And it’s this code negotiation that leads to productive play.
このルール作りの過程が生産的な遊びにつながるのです
24:56
So, remember the sketching task we did at the beginning?
最初にスケッチの課題をしましたね?
25:01
The kind of little face, the portrait you did?
隣の人の似顔絵の課題です
25:03
Well, imagine if you did the same task with friends
パブで飲んでいて友達とそれと同じ課題をすると
25:05
while you were drinking in a pub.
想像してみてください
25:09
But everybody agreed to play a game
でも今度は、一番下手だった人が次にみんなが飲むお酒を
25:11
where the worst sketch artist bought the next round of drinks.
おごらなくてはならないというルールにみんなが同意したとします
25:14
That framework of rules would have turned an embarrassing,
そうするとこのルールによって恥ずかしくてやりにくかった課題が
25:18
difficult situation into a fun game.
楽しいゲームに変わってしまうのです
25:22
As a result, we’d all feel perfectly secure and have a good time --
結果として、みんなが完璧に安心できる状態で楽しい時を過ごせるのですが
25:24
but because we all understood the rules and we agreed on them together.
それは私たちは皆ルールを理解して、それに同意をしたからです
25:30
But there aren’t just rules about how to play;
どのように遊ぶかについてのルールだけでなく
25:35
there are rules about when to play.
いつ遊ぶかというルールもあります
25:39
Kids don’t play all the time, obviously.
子供たちはずーっと遊んでいる訳ではないですよね
25:42
They transition in and out of it,
彼らはオン-オフを使い分けます
25:44
and good teachers spend a lot of time
良い先生は、どう子供達にこの切り替えをさせるか
25:46
thinking about how to move kids through these experiences.
と考えることに多くの時間を費やします
25:49
As designers, we need to be able to transition in and out of play also.
デザイナーとして、私達もそのオン-オフをしなくてはならないのです
25:53
And if we’re running design studios
例えばデザイン会社を運営するときに
25:58
we need to be able to figure out, how can we transition
どのようにしてデザイナーに
26:00
designers through these different experiences?
さまざまな体験を切り替えさせるか考え出す必要があります
26:02
I think this is particularly true if we think about the sort of --
これが特によく当てはまると思うのは…
26:05
I think what’s very different about design
私が思うにデザインが他と違っていることは
26:08
is that we go through these two very distinctive modes of operation.
この全く異なる2つのモードを使い分ける必要があることです
26:11
We go through a sort of generative mode,
たくさんのアイデアを探索する
26:15
where we’re exploring many ideas;
生成的な段階と
26:20
and then we come back together again,
それらをつなぎ合わせて
26:21
and come back looking for that solution,
そこから解決策を探しだし
26:23
and developing that solution.
発展させる段階です
26:26
I think they’re two quite different modes:
これら2つは全く異なる段階です
26:27
divergence and convergence.
つまり発散と収束です
26:30
And I think it’s probably in the divergent mode
おそらく発散段階では
26:33
that we most need playfulness.
遊びが必要とされています
26:36
Perhaps in convergent mode we need to be more serious.
収束段階では真剣さが必要です
26:38
And so being able to move between those modes
この二つの段階を行き来できることが
26:41
is really quite important. So, it’s where there’s a
より重要なのです。つまり、意味合いの少し異なった
26:43
more nuanced version view of play, I think, is required.
遊びに対する見方が必要なのです
26:47
Because it’s very easy to fall into the trap that these states are absolute.
なぜならこれら段階は独立したものだと考え
26:50
You’re either playful or you’re serious, and you can’t be both.
「遊びか真剣、同時には出来ない」と考えてしまいがちです
26:53
But that’s not really true: you can be a serious professional adult
しかしそれは少し違います。私達は真剣なプロの大人でありながら
26:57
and, at times, be playful.
「同時に」、遊び好きになることが出来ます
27:02
It’s not an either/or; it’s an "and."
それは、「もしくは」ではなく「かつ」であり
27:05
You can be serious and play.
同時に真剣でもあり遊びでもあるのです
27:07
So to sum it up, we need trust to play,
まとめると、私達には遊べるという信頼感が必要であり
27:11
and we need trust to be creative. So, there’s a connection.
かつ創造的になれる信頼感が必要で、この2つには関連があります
27:17
And there are a series of behaviors that we’ve learnt as kids,
私達が子供のときに学んだ数々の行動があり
27:21
and that turn out to be quite useful to us as designers.
それはデザイナーとしてとても役立つものだと分かりました
27:24
They include exploration, which is about going for quantity;
その行動は量を求める探索
27:27
building, and thinking with your hands;
自分の手で組み立て、考えること
27:32
and role-play, where acting it out helps us both
そして、ロールプレイして演じることで
27:35
to have more empathy for the situations in which we’re designing,
私達のデザインする状況に感情移入することが出来
27:39
and to create services and experiences
つなぎ目のない確かな
27:42
that are seamless and authentic.
サービスや体験を作り出せるようになるのです
27:45
Thank you very much. (Applause)
ありがとうございました
27:49
Translated by Hiroaki Yamane
Reviewed by Yasushi Aoki

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Tim Brown - Designer
Tim Brown is the CEO of the "innovation and design" firm IDEO -- taking an approach to design that digs deeper than the surface.

Why you should listen

Tim Brown is the CEO of innovation and design firm IDEO, taking an approach to design that digs deeper than the surface. Having taken over from founder David E. Kelley, Tim Brown carries forward the firm's mission of fusing design, business and social studies to come up with deeply researched, deeply understood designs and ideas -- they call it "design thinking."

IDEO is the kind of firm that companies turn to when they want a top-down rethink of a business or product -- from fast food conglomerates to high-tech startups, hospitals to universities.

IDEO has designed and prototyped everything from a life-saving portable defibrillator to the defining details at the groundbreaking Prada shop in Manhattan to corporate processes. And check out the Global Chain Reaction for a sample of how seriously this firm takes play.

Curious about design thinking? Sign up for an IDEO U design thinking course or check out this free toolkit: Design Thinking for Educators.

More profile about the speaker
Tim Brown | Speaker | TED.com