English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TEDGlobal 2005

Martin Rees: Is this our final century?

マーティン・リース: 今や人類にとっての最終世紀なのか?

Filmed
Views 2,133,146

天文学者として また人類の将来を憂えるメンバーの一人としてマーティン卿は宇宙的な観点から地球の現状と将来について考えています。科学と技術進化によって悪い結果が起こらぬよう急いで行動をとるべきであると訴えます。

- Astrophysicist
Lord Martin Rees, one of the world's most eminent astronomers, is an emeritus professor of cosmology and astrophysics at the University of Cambridge and the UK's Astronomer Royal. He is one of our key thinkers on the future of humanity in the cosmos. Full bio

If you take 10,000 people at random, 9,999 have something in common:
10,000人をランダムに選んだら その内
9,999人には何か共通点があるでしょう
00:24
their interests in business lie on or near the Earth's surface.
共通の関心事が
地球上かどこかにあるものです
00:30
The odd one out is an astronomer, and I am one of that strange breed.
でも残りの1人が天文学者
私もそんな変わり者の1人です
00:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:39
My talk will be in two parts. I'll talk first as an astronomer,
私の話は2部からなります
1つ目は宇宙学者として
00:40
and then as a worried member of the human race.
次に人類について憂慮するものとして
お話しします
00:45
But let's start off by remembering that Darwin showed
まずはダーウィンが示したこと-
我々人類は
00:49
how we're the outcome of four billion years of evolution.
40億年間の進化の結果であることを
思い出してみましょう
00:54
And what we try to do in astronomy and cosmology
我々が天文学や宇宙学で
研究していることは
00:58
is to go back before Darwin's simple beginning,
ダーウィンのいう生物の進化の開始以前
01:01
to set our Earth in a cosmic context.
地球の誕生を宇宙の成り立ちの観点から
解き明かすことです
01:04
And let me just run through a few slides.
まずは数枚のスライドを
お見せしましょう
01:08
This was the impact that happened last week on a comet.
これは先週 彗星に起きた衝突の様子です
01:11
If they'd sent a nuke, it would have been rather more spectacular
これが核爆弾だったら
この前の月曜日に
01:16
than what actually happened last Monday.
起きたことよりも
凄かったことでしょう
01:18
So that's another project for NASA.
それはNASAの別のプロジェクトのことです
01:21
That's Mars from the European Mars Express, and at New Year.
これはマーズ・エクスプレスからの火星で
新年に撮影されたものです
01:23
This artist's impression turned into reality
土星の巨大な月であるタイタンに
パラシュートが降り立つという
01:28
when a parachute landed on Titan, Saturn's giant moon.
こんな想像図が
現実のものとなったのです
01:33
It landed on the surface. This is pictures taken on the way down.
大地に着地しました
写真は下降中に撮影されたものです
01:37
That looks like a coastline.
まるで海岸のようです
01:41
It is indeed, but the ocean is liquid methane --
実際にそうなのですが
液体メタンの海で
01:42
the temperature minus 170 degrees centigrade.
温度は摂氏マイナス170度です
01:45
If we go beyond our solar system,
太陽系の外にまで出てみると
01:50
we've learned that the stars aren't twinkly points of light.
星はキラキラとは
光っていないことが分かりました
01:52
Each one is like a sun with a retinue of planets orbiting around it.
各々が その周りを周回する惑星を従える
太陽のようなものです
01:56
And we can see places where stars are forming,
また わし星雲のような
星が誕生する場所を見ることもできます
02:01
like the Eagle Nebula. We see stars dying.
星の死も見えます
02:04
In six billion years, the sun will look like that.
60億年も経てば
我々の太陽もこのようになるでしょう
02:07
And some stars die spectacularly in a supernova explosion,
超新星爆発を起こして
華々しく散るものもあり
02:10
leaving remnants like that.
このような残骸を残します
02:14
On a still bigger scale, we see entire galaxies of stars.
もっと大きなスケールでは
星雲全体を見ることになります
02:16
We see entire ecosystems where gas is being recycled.
ガスが再利用される
巨大なエコシステムといえるでしょう
02:20
And to the cosmologist,
宇宙学者としては
このような星雲でさえ
02:23
these galaxies are just the atoms, as it were, of the large-scale universe.
もっと大きなスケールの宇宙の中では
まるで原子のような存在に思えます
02:25
This picture shows a patch of sky
この写真は空のとても小さい一断片で
02:31
so small that it would take about 100 patches like it
満月を覆うには
02:34
to cover the full moon in the sky.
100枚もの写真が必要です
02:37
Through a small telescope, this would look quite blank,
小さな望遠鏡なら
何も写っていないでしょう
02:40
but you see here hundreds of little, faint smudges.
でもここでは数百の小さな
しみのようなものが見えますね
02:42
Each is a galaxy, fully like ours or Andromeda,
それぞれが銀河で 我が銀河や
アンドロメダ銀河のようなものですが
02:46
which looks so small and faint because its light
とても小さく 微かな光に見えます
02:50
has taken 10 billion light-years to get to us.
というのも 100億光年もの先から
届いた光だからです
02:52
The stars in those galaxies probably don't have planets around them.
このような銀河の恒星にはその周りを
周回する惑星を伴っていないでしょう
02:56
There's scant chance of life there -- that's because there's been no time
生命が存在する可能性も
ほとんどありません
03:01
for the nuclear fusion in stars to make silicon and carbon and iron,
なぜなら星内部での核融合により
惑星や生物の主要構成物である
03:04
the building blocks of planets and of life.
ケイ素、炭素や鉄を作り出す
時間がないからです
03:10
We believe that all of this emerged from a Big Bang --
全ては熱く 凝縮した状態である
ビッグバンから生じたと信じられています
03:14
a hot, dense state. So how did that amorphous Big Bang
ではこの形のないビッグバンから
どのようにして
03:20
turn into our complex cosmos?
複雑な宇宙が造られたのでしょうか
03:24
I'm going to show you a movie simulation
シミュレーション動画をお見せしましょう
03:26
16 powers of 10 faster than real time,
実時間よりも10の16乗の速さで
03:29
which shows a patch of the universe where the expansions have subtracted out.
宇宙のほんの一部を
宇宙の膨張を無視してお見せしています
03:31
But you see, as time goes on in gigayears at the bottom,
ご覧のとおり数十億年の時間が経つと
03:35
you will see structures evolve as gravity feeds
重力の効果によって
03:39
on small, dense irregularities, and structures develop.
小さく密度の高い不規則な部分が生じ
構造体へと進化していきます
03:42
And we'll end up after 13 billion years
そして130億年後に
03:46
with something looking rather like our own universe.
我々の今ある宇宙のようになります
03:48
And we compare simulated universes like that --
シミュレーションによる宇宙を
こんな風に比べてみましょう
03:55
I'll show you a better simulation at the end of my talk --
実際の空を見るような
03:58
with what we actually see in the sky.
もっと素晴らしいシミュレーションを
トークの終わりにお見せします
04:00
Well, we can trace things back to the earlier stages of the Big Bang,
ではビッグバンの初期段階を
追跡してみましょう
04:04
but we still don't know what banged and why it banged.
といっても何がなぜ爆発したのか
我々は今なお知りません
04:10
That's a challenge for 21st-century science.
これこそ21世紀の科学が
挑戦していることです
04:14
If my research group had a logo, it would be this picture here:
私の研究チームにロゴがあるとしたら
こんな感じがいいのですが -
04:19
an ouroboros, where you see the micro-world on the left --
ウロボロスです
ミクロの世界が左側で -
04:22
the world of the quantum -- and on the right
量子の世界ですね -
そして右側は
04:27
the large-scale universe of planets, stars and galaxies.
惑星、恒星、銀河からなる
巨大なスケールの宇宙です
04:30
We know our universes are united though --
我々の宇宙はこれら左右の世界が
04:35
links between left and right.
リンクし 統合されています
04:37
The everyday world is determined by atoms,
日常の世界は原子同士がくっつき合い
04:39
how they stick together to make molecules.
分子を形成することによって
成り立っています
04:41
Stars are fueled by how the nuclei in those atoms react together.
星は原子内の核同士が反応することにより
エネルギーを産み出しています
04:43
And, as we've learned in the last few years, galaxies are held together
ここ数年の研究で 銀河はいわゆる
暗黒物質の重力により
04:49
by the gravitational pull of so-called dark matter:
互いにに引き合っていることが
分かってきました
04:52
particles in huge swarms, far smaller even than atomic nuclei.
その粒子は原子核よりもずっと小さいものの
大集団を形成しています
04:55
But we'd like to know the synthesis symbolized at the very top.
図のトップに象徴的に書かれている
この統合関係を知りたいのです
05:01
The micro-world of the quantum is understood.
量子によるミクロの世界は分かりました
05:07
On the right hand side, gravity holds sway. Einstein explained that.
右側は重力が支配しています
これはアインシュタインが解明しました
05:10
But the unfinished business for 21st-century science
21世紀の科学で
未だ解決できていないのは
05:15
is to link together cosmos and micro-world
宇宙とミクロの世界を結びつける
05:18
with a unified theory -- symbolized, as it were, gastronomically
統一理論です-図の上の部分で
05:20
at the top of that picture. (Laughter)
美味しそうに描かれていますね(笑)
05:24
And until we have that synthesis,
この統合が解明されない限り
05:26
we won't be able to understand the very beginning of our universe
宇宙の始まりを理解することはできません
05:28
because when our universe was itself the size of an atom,
なぜなら我が宇宙そのものが
原子の大きさ程度であったので
05:31
quantum effects could shake everything.
量子効果が全てを支配していたからです
05:34
And so we need a theory that unifies the very large and the very small,
そして巨大なスケールと微小スケールを
結びつける理論が必要ですが
05:37
which we don't yet have.
我々はそれを持ち合わせていません
05:41
One idea, incidentally --
たまたま思いついたことですが
05:44
and I had this hazard sign to say I'm going to speculate from now on --
この「注意!」の標識を見てビッグバンは
05:46
is that our Big Bang was not the only one.
1つではなかったのではと
考え始めています
05:51
One idea is that our three-dimensional universe
我々3次元の世界は
高次元の空間に
05:53
may be embedded in a high-dimensional space,
埋め込まれたものだという
考えもあるのです
05:57
just as you can imagine on these sheets of paper.
この2枚の紙にようなものを
想像してください
05:59
You can imagine ants on one of them
ここに住むアリは
06:02
thinking it's a two-dimensional universe,
自分は2次元の世界にいると思いこみ
06:04
not being aware of another population of ants on the other.
向こう側の世界のアリに
気づかないのです
06:06
So there could be another universe just a millimeter away from ours,
我々の住む世界からほんの数ミリ離れた
ところに別の世界があるかもしれません
06:08
but we're not aware of it because that millimeter
わずか数ミリですが
4つ目の次元なので
06:12
is measured in some fourth spatial dimension,
3次元の世界に
閉じこめられた我々は
06:15
and we're imprisoned in our three.
気づくことができません
06:17
And so we believe that there may be a lot more to physical reality
この様に ビッグバン理論に
よって信じられてきた
06:19
than what we've normally called our universe --
一般的な宇宙とは異なる
06:24
the aftermath of our Big Bang. And here's another picture.
宇宙の実体があるのではないかと
信じています
06:26
Bottom right depicts our universe,
右下は我々の宇宙を表しています
06:29
which on the horizon is not beyond that,
その地平線は この宇宙に属しています
06:31
but even that is just one bubble, as it were, in some vaster reality.
しかしたった1つの泡のように見えるものが
巨大な実体なのです
06:33
Many people suspect that just as we've gone from believing
多くの人達はただ1つの太陽系から
06:38
in one solar system to zillions of solar systems,
膨大な数の太陽系
そして一つの銀河系から
06:41
one galaxy to many galaxies,
多数の銀河系へと
考えを広げてきましたが
06:45
we have to go to many Big Bangs from one Big Bang,
今やビッグバンは1つでなく
多数あったのではないかと考え始めています
06:47
perhaps these many Big Bangs displaying
複数のビッグバンにより
06:51
an immense variety of properties.
様々な性質を持った宇宙が登場するでしょう
06:53
Well, let's go back to this picture.
ではこの絵にもどってみましょう
06:55
There's one challenge symbolized at the top,
絵の一番上の部分が解明が
困難な点ですが
06:57
but there's another challenge to science symbolized at the bottom.
もう1つ 真下のあるところも
科学にとっての挑戦です
07:00
You want to not only synthesize the very large and the very small,
巨大スケールと微小スケールの
物理の統一だけではなく
07:04
but we want to understand the very complex.
その中間にある複雑な物理も
知りたいところです
07:07
And the most complex things are ourselves,
最も複雑なのは我々自身で
07:10
midway between atoms and stars.
原子と星の中間に位置します
07:12
We depend on stars to make the atoms we're made of.
我々は星が作りだした原子で
構成されています
07:14
We depend on chemistry to determine our complex structure.
我々の複雑な構造は
化学に依存しています
07:16
We clearly have to be large, compared to atoms,
これは原子に比べ明らかに
大きなスケールで
07:22
to have layer upon layer of complex structure.
何層ものレベルで
複雑な構造をしています
07:25
We clearly have to be small, compared to stars and planets --
我々は星や惑星に比べたら
小さくあるべきです さもなければ-
07:27
otherwise we'd be crushed by gravity. And in fact, we are midway.
重力に押しつぶされてしまうでしょう
事実 中間に位置するのです
07:30
It would take as many human bodies to make up the sun
我々の体にある原子の数ほどの
人が集まると
07:34
as there are atoms in each of us.
太陽の質量に相当するでしょう
07:36
The geometric mean of the mass of a proton
陽子の質量と太陽の質量の
07:38
and the mass of the sun is 50 kilograms,
幾何平均が50 kg であり
07:40
within a factor of two of the mass of each person here.
ここにいる皆さんの質量は
この2倍までの範囲にありますね
07:43
Well, most of you anyway.
大抵の方は ですが
07:46
The science of complexity is probably the greatest challenge of all,
複雑系の科学は
おそらく最も難しい分野です
07:47
greater than that of the very small on the left
左側の小さい世界よりや
07:52
and the very large on the right.
右側の大きな世界よりも難しいのです
07:54
And it's this science,
この分野の科学は
07:57
which is not only enlightening our understanding of the biological world,
生物の世界を解き明かすだけでなく
07:59
but also transforming our world faster than ever.
我々の生活を急速に変化させています
08:03
And more than that, it's engendering new kinds of change.
変化の仕方そのものにも新しさがあります
08:07
And I now move on to the second part of my talk,
ではお話を2つ目の話題に移しましょう
08:11
and the book "Our Final Century" was mentioned.
私の著書『Our Final Century』の
話です
08:16
If I was not a self-effacing Brit, I would mention the book myself,
私は自重的 典型的イギリス人ではないので
自分の本を紹介いたしましょう
08:20
and I would add that it's available in paperback.
そうペーパーバックも出ていますよ
08:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:27
And in America it was called "Our Final Hour"
アメリカでは『Our Final Hour』となっています
08:30
because Americans like instant gratification.
アメリカ人は気が短いですからね
08:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:35
But my theme is that in this century,
でも今日のテーマはこの世紀のことです
08:37
not only has science changed the world faster than ever,
科学は世界をかつてない勢いで
変化させているだけではなく
08:40
but in new and different ways.
新しく 異なる形で変化させています
08:43
Targeted drugs, genetic modification, artificial intelligence,
分子標的薬、遺伝子操作、人工知能
ひょっとすると
08:46
perhaps even implants into our brains,
脳への器具の埋め込みすらあるでしょう
08:50
may change human beings themselves. And human beings,
こういったことは人間そのものを
変化させるかもしれません
08:52
their physique and character, has not changed for thousands of years.
人間は その体格や性質を何千年もの間
変化させてきませんでした
08:55
It may change this century.
今世紀には変化があるかもしれません
08:59
It's new in our history.
人類の歴史で新たなことです
09:01
And the human impact on the global environment -- greenhouse warming,
人類は地球の環境に影響を与えています
- 温室効果
09:03
mass extinctions and so forth -- is unprecedented, too.
生物の大量絶滅など -
これも前例のないことです
09:06
And so, this makes this coming century a challenge.
その影響で 今世紀には
多くの挑戦が待ち受けています
09:10
Bio- and cybertechnologies are environmentally benign
バイオテクノロジーやサイバー技術が
環境に及ぼす影響は小さく
09:15
in that they offer marvelous prospects,
素晴らしい展望があるにもかかわらず
09:18
while, nonetheless, reducing pressure on energy and resources.
エネルギーや資源の消費を
抑えることができます
09:20
But they will have a dark side.
しかし負の側面もあります
09:24
In our interconnected world, novel technology could empower
互いに関連しあう世界では
卓越した技術は
09:27
just one fanatic,
一人の狂人や数人の変わり者に力を与え
09:31
or some weirdo with a mindset of those who now design computer viruses,
コンピュータウィルスによって
09:33
to trigger some kind on disaster.
破壊的なことを引き起こすかもしれません
09:37
Indeed, catastrophe could arise simply from technical misadventure --
実際 破滅的なことは
意図的なテロ的行為ではなく
09:39
error rather than terror.
単に技術的な偶発性に
よるかもしれません
09:43
And even a tiny probability of catastrophe is unacceptable
その影響が地球規模に及ぶのであれば
破滅がおこる確率が
09:45
when the downside could be of global consequence.
ほんの僅かであっても
許されることではありません
09:50
In fact, some years ago, Bill Joy wrote an article
実際 数年前にビル・ジョイが書いた記事では
09:55
expressing tremendous concern about robots taking us over, etc.
ロボットが世界を支配する可能性を
深刻に語っています
09:59
I don't go along with all that,
これに同意しませんが
10:03
but it's interesting that he had a simple solution.
ジョイの単純な解決策は
興味深いものです
10:04
It was what he called "fine-grained relinquishment."
それは「きめ細かな放棄」というもので
10:06
He wanted to give up the dangerous kind of science
危険な類の科学を放棄し
良いものだけを残すのです
10:09
and keep the good bits. Now, that's absurdly naive for two reasons.
彼は2つの理由で
愚かなまでにナイーブです
10:12
First, any scientific discovery has benign consequences
1つ目に どんな科学の発見にも
無害の側面と
10:16
as well as dangerous ones.
危険な面があります
10:20
And also, when a scientist makes a discovery,
科学者が何かを発見すると
10:22
he or she normally has no clue what the applications are going to be.
彼らはその応用について
考えが及びません
10:25
And so what this means is that we have to accept the risks
つまり科学のメリットを
享受しようとするときは
10:29
if we are going to enjoy the benefits of science.
一方でリスクも
覚悟しなければならないということです
10:34
We have to accept that there will be hazards.
危険が待ち受けていることを覚悟すべきです
10:38
And I think we have to go back to what happened in the post-War era,
終戦後に起こったことを
振り返ってみるべきです
10:41
post-World War II, when the nuclear scientists
第二次世界大戦後
原子爆弾の製造に関わった
10:47
who'd been involved in making the atomic bomb,
核科学者たちの多くは
10:50
in many cases were concerned that they should do all they could
核の危険性について世界に
警鐘を鳴らすべきだと
10:52
to alert the world to the dangers.
真剣に考えました
10:56
And they were inspired not by the young Einstein,
彼らは相対性理論という素晴らしい成果を
残した若きアインシュタインではなく
10:58
who did the great work in relativity, but by the old Einstein,
物理法則の統一の試みに失敗した
11:02
the icon of poster and t-shirt,
ポスターとTシャツで象徴される
11:07
who failed in his scientific efforts to unify the physical laws.
年老いたアインシュタインに触発されました
11:10
He was premature. But he was a moral compass --
彼の理論は未完成でしたが
軍縮に関心を抱いていた
11:14
an inspiration to scientists who were concerned with arms control.
科学者たちにとって
道徳的な指針を与えたのです
11:17
And perhaps the greatest living person
私の知る限り存命で
11:22
is someone I'm privileged to know, Joe Rothblatt.
最も素晴らしい人物は
ジョー・ロスブラットです
11:24
Equally untidy office there, as you can see.
ご覧のとおり 彼の部屋は
どこも散らかっています
11:27
He's 96 years old, and he founded the Pugwash movement.
彼は96才です
かつてパグウォッシュ運動を始めました
11:30
He persuaded Einstein, as his last act,
彼は最後の行動として
バートランド・ラッセルの
11:34
to sign the famous memorandum of Bertrand Russell.
有名な覚え書きに署名するよう
アインシュタインを説得しました
11:36
And he sets an example of the concerned scientist.
彼も問題意識をもった科学者でした
11:39
And I think to harness science optimally,
どの側面を残し 何を抑えて
11:44
to choose which doors to open and which to leave closed,
科学を進歩させるか考えています
11:47
we need latter-day counterparts of people like Joseph Rothblatt.
後者については
ヨセフ・ロスブラットのような人が必要です
11:50
We need not just campaigning physicists,
物理学だけを推進するのではなく
11:55
but we need biologists, computer experts
生物学者やコンピュータの専門家
11:57
and environmentalists as well.
そして環境学者も必要です
11:59
And I think academics and independent entrepreneurs
学者や独立した企業家達は
12:02
have a special obligation because they have more freedom
特別な義務を負っていると思います
12:05
than those in government service,
というのも 政府関連組織や
12:07
or company employees subject to commercial pressure.
商業的な圧力のかかった会社の従業員より
自由度が高いからです
12:09
I wrote my book, "Our Final Century," as a scientist,
私は『Our Final Century』を
12:12
just a general scientist. But there's one respect, I think,
一般的な科学者として書きました
ある関心事があったからです
12:17
in which being a cosmologist offered a special perspective,
宇宙学者としてある特別な展望を
提供したかったのです
12:20
and that's that it offers an awareness of the immense future.
それは遥かな将来に対する認識です
12:24
The stupendous time spans of the evolutionary past
進化には途方もない時間がかかりました
12:28
are now part of common culture --
それは今や常識とされることですが―
12:31
outside the American Bible Belt, anyway --
アメリカの聖書地帯を除けばですけどね―
12:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:37
but most people, even those who are familiar with evolution,
進化論に馴染んでいる多くの人でさえ
12:38
aren't mindful that even more time lies ahead.
これまで以上の長い時間が先にあることに
注意を払っていません
12:42
The sun has been shining for four and a half billion years,
太陽は45億年輝いてきましたが
12:46
but it'll be another six billion years before its fuel runs out.
燃料が尽きるまで
まだ60億年が残されています
12:49
On that schematic picture, a sort of time-lapse picture, we're halfway.
時の流れを表す この概念図では
まだ半分あたりのところにいます
12:53
And it'll be another six billion before that happens,
終わりを迎えるまでに
まだ60億年あるのに
12:59
and any remaining life on Earth is vaporized.
地球上の生物が
消え失せようとしています
13:04
There's an unthinking tendency to imagine that humans will be there,
太陽が死期を向える時まで
人類が存在しているのだという想像を
13:09
experiencing the sun's demise,
疑うことがない
そんな傾向がありますが
13:12
but any life and intelligence that exists then
その時に生存する
全ての生物や知的生命体は
13:14
will be as different from us as we are from bacteria.
我々がバクテリアとは全く異なるくらいに
違ったものになっているでしょう
13:17
The unfolding of intelligence and complexity
知性と複雑性の進化には
13:21
still has immensely far to go, here on Earth and probably far beyond.
地球 いやおそらく地球外で
途方もない時間が残されており
13:23
So we are still at the beginning of the emergence of complexity
地球上とその外における複雑性の進化は
13:29
in our Earth and beyond.
始まったばかりといえるのです
13:32
If you represent the Earth's lifetime by a single year,
地球の一生を1月から12月までの
13:35
say from January when it was made to December,
1年としてたとえてみると
13:39
the 21st-century would be a quarter of a second in June --
21世紀は6月のある4分の1秒 -
13:42
a tiny fraction of the year.
1年のほんの一瞬にしかすぎません
13:48
But even in this concertinaed cosmic perspective,
しかしこの天文学的な観点から見ても
13:51
our century is very, very special,
この世紀はとても とても特別なのです
13:55
the first when humans can change themselves and their home planet.
人間自身が変化し自ら住む惑星を
変えてしまうことを初めて可能にしました
13:58
As I should have shown this earlier,
先ほど述べたはずですが
14:03
it will not be humans who witness the end point of the sun;
太陽の死期を見届けるのは
人類ではありません
14:06
it will be creatures as different from us as we are from bacteria.
人間がバクテリアとは異なるくらい
人間とは違った生命でしょう
14:09
When Einstein died in 1955,
アインシュタインが1955年に亡くなった時
14:14
one striking tribute to his global status was this cartoon
世界的に有名な彼に対する
大賛辞の漫画がワシントン・ポストの
14:17
by Herblock in the Washington Post.
ハーブロックによって書かれました
14:20
The plaque reads, "Albert Einstein lived here."
ここには「アインシュタインが
ここに住んでいた」と書かれています
14:22
And I'd like to end with a vignette, as it were, inspired by this image.
私が感動した このちょっとした写真で
話を終わりにすることとしましょう
14:26
We've been familiar for 40 years with this image:
我々が40年間親しんできたこの映像ですが
14:30
the fragile beauty of land, ocean and clouds,
大地、大海と雲のはかない美しさは
14:36
contrasted with the sterile moonscape
宇宙飛行士が足跡を残した
14:39
on which the astronauts left their footprints.
不毛な月の風景と対照的です
14:41
But let's suppose some aliens had been watching our pale blue dot
しかし宇宙人が
この青白い点を遠い宇宙から
14:45
in the cosmos from afar, not just for 40 years,
僅か40年間ではなく
地球の45億年の全歴史を
14:49
but for the entire 4.5 billion-year history of our Earth.
見続けていたと考えてみてください
14:53
What would they have seen?
彼らは何を目撃するでしょう?
14:58
Over nearly all that immense time,
長い時間をかけて地球の様子は
15:00
Earth's appearance would have changed very gradually.
非常にゆっくりと変化したことでしょう
15:02
The only abrupt worldwide change
突然の変化といえば
15:05
would have been major asteroid impacts or volcanic super-eruptions.
大隕石の衝突や
火山の大爆発くらいであったことでしょう
15:07
Apart from those brief traumas, nothing happens suddenly.
そのような災害を除けば
突然的な出来事はありませんでした
15:13
The continental landmasses drifted around.
大陸が移動し
15:17
Ice cover waxed and waned.
表面を覆っていた氷が解けていき
15:20
Successions of new species emerged, evolved and became extinct.
次から次への新しい種が誕生 進化し
そして滅びていきました
15:22
But in just a tiny sliver of the Earth's history,
しかし地球の歴史の僅かな断片
15:26
the last one-millionth part, a few thousand years,
最後の100万分の1
つまり数千年の間に
15:30
the patterns of vegetation altered much faster than before.
植生のパターンが
かつてないスピードで変化しました
15:34
This signaled the start of agriculture.
これは農業の開始を意味します
15:37
Change has accelerated as human populations rose.
人口増加に伴って変化は加速しました
15:40
Then other things happened even more abruptly.
もっと急激に起こったことは
15:44
Within just 50 years --
たった最後の50年
15:46
that's one hundredth of one millionth of the Earth's age --
地球の年齢の1億分の1の間に
15:48
the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere started to rise,
大気中の二酸化炭素の量が
増加を始めました
15:52
and ominously fast.
不吉なほどの速さの増加です
15:56
The planet became an intense emitter of radio waves --
この惑星ではテレビ 携帯電話
15:58
the total output from all TV and cell phones
さらにはレーダから発信される
16:00
and radar transmissions. And something else happened.
電波の強度が強くなりました
それだけでなく
16:04
Metallic objects -- albeit very small ones, a few tons at most --
金属物体が - とても小さく
せいぜい数トンとはいえ
16:07
escaped into orbit around the Earth.
地球の軌道を飛び出すようになりました
16:12
Some journeyed to the moons and planets.
いくつかは月や他の惑星へと旅立ちました
16:15
A race of advanced extraterrestrials
進化した地球外生物は
16:17
watching our solar system from afar
太陽系を遠くから観察し
16:19
could confidently predict Earth's final doom in another six billion years.
地球の次の60億年の運命を
確信をもって予測することでしょう
16:22
But could they have predicted this unprecedented spike
しかし彼らは予測できたでしょうか?
16:27
less than halfway through the Earth's life?
地球の一生の半分にも満たない時に
未曾有の変化が起きたことを
16:31
These human-induced alterations
人類によって引き起こされた変化が
16:34
occupying overall less than a millionth of the elapsed lifetime
数百万分の1にも満たない時間の間に
16:36
and seemingly occurring with runaway speed?
とてつもないスピードで起きたことを
16:40
If they continued their vigil,
この仮想エイリアンが
16:43
what might these hypothetical aliens witness
監視をあと数百年続けたら
16:45
in the next hundred years?
何を目撃するでしょうか?
16:47
Will some spasm foreclose Earth's future?
何かが突発的に起こり
地球が終焉を迎えるでしょうか?
16:50
Or will the biosphere stabilize?
それとも生物圏に安定が訪れるでしょうか?
16:53
Or will some of the metallic objects launched from the Earth
それとも金属物体が地球から飛び出し
16:56
spawn new oases, a post-human life elsewhere?
どこかに新たなオアシスを作り出し
新人類的な生活を送るのでしょうか
16:59
The science done by the young Einstein will continue
若きアインシュタインが創出した科学は
文明のある限り有効ですが
17:03
as long as our civilization, but for civilization to survive,
文明が存続するには
年老いたアインシュタインの
17:06
we'll need the wisdom of the old Einstein --
人間的で大局観があり
将来を見通すような
17:11
humane, global and farseeing.
知恵を必要とします
17:13
And whatever happens in this uniquely crucial century
この特異的に重要な世紀に
何が起ころうとも それは
17:15
will resonate into the remote future and perhaps far beyond the Earth,
遠い未来と そしてお話ししたように
おそらく地球を遠く離れたところまで
17:20
far beyond the Earth as depicted here.
影響が現れることでしょう
17:26
Thank you very much.
どうも有難うございました
17:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:30
Translated by Tomoyuki Suzuki
Reviewed by Masako Kigami

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Martin Rees - Astrophysicist
Lord Martin Rees, one of the world's most eminent astronomers, is an emeritus professor of cosmology and astrophysics at the University of Cambridge and the UK's Astronomer Royal. He is one of our key thinkers on the future of humanity in the cosmos.

Why you should listen

Lord Martin Rees has issued a clarion call for humanity. His 2004 book, ominously titled Our Final Hour, catalogues the threats facing the human race in a 21st century dominated by unprecedented and accelerating scientific change. He calls on scientists and nonscientists alike to take steps that will ensure our survival as a species.

One of the world's leading astronomers, Rees is an emeritus professor of cosmology and astrophysics at Cambridge, and UK Astronomer Royal. Author of more than 500 research papers on cosmological topics ranging from black holes to quantum physics to the Big Bang, Rees has received countless awards for his scientific contributions. But equally significant has been his devotion to explaining the complexities of science for a general audience, in books like Before the Beginning and Our Cosmic Habitat.

More profile about the speaker
Martin Rees | Speaker | TED.com