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TED2001

John Wooden: The difference between winning and succeeding

ジョン・ウーデン;勝利と成功の違い

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元バスケットボールコーチのジョン・ウーデンは「成功」の新たな意味を明解に示し、人々に自己のベストを追い求めるように語る。この講話では、UCLAの選手達へ贈った言葉、詩の引用、そして自身の父親の教えを私達に伝えてくれた。

- Coach
John Wooden, affectionately known as Coach, led UCLA to record wins that are still unmatched in the world of basketball. Throughout his long life, he shared the values and life lessons he passed to his players, emphasizing success that’s about much more than winning. Full bio

I coined my own definition of success
私なりに成功の定義をしたのは
00:12
in 1934, when I was teaching at a high school in South Bend, Indiana,
1934年 インディアナの高校で教えていた時
00:15
being a little bit disappointed, and delusioned perhaps, by
私は少し戸惑い、がっかりしました
00:19
the way parents of the youngsters in my English classes
英語のクラスの学生の親は
00:24
expected their youngsters to
子供たちにAかBをとる事だけを
00:28
get an A or a B. They thought a C was all right for the neighbors' children,
期待していた 近所の子がCを取ってもいいが...
00:31
because the neighbors children are all average.
近所の子供はみな平均的だから
00:34
But they weren't satisfied when their own --
しかし自分の子の場合は不満で
00:37
would make the teacher feel that they had failed, or the youngster had failed.
むしろ 悪いのは教師だとでも言いたげだった
00:39
And that's not right. The good Lord in his infinite wisdom
これは間違いだ 全能の父なる神は
00:43
didn't create us all equal as far as intelligence is concerned,
人間の形や見た目、知能でさえも
00:45
any more than we're equal for size, appearance.
平等には作られなかった
00:48
Not everybody could earn an A or a B, and I didn't like that way of judging it.
みんながみんなAやBを取ることが出来る こんな評価は好きではない。
00:52
And I did know how the alumni of various schools
30年代に 卒業生や学校関係者が
00:55
back in the 30s judged coaches and athletic teams.
コーチやチームをどう評価したかは知らない
00:59
If you won them all, you were considered to be reasonably successful --
全勝していれば まあ「成功」のようだが
01:03
not completely. Because I found out --
でもそうとは限らなかった なぜなら
01:08
we had a number of years at UCLA where we didn't lose a game.
私たちはUCLAで何年間も負けを知らなかったが
01:11
But it seemed that we didn't win each individual game by the margin
小差でギリギリ勝ったとき以外は
01:14
that some of our alumni had predicted and
結果をよまれていた
01:18
quite frequently I --
それでときどき 私は
01:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:22
-- quite frequently I really felt that they had backed up their predictions
私はその読みにもっと実利に基づいた
01:24
in a more materialistic manner.
裏付けでもあったのかと思った
01:27
But that was true back in the 30s, so I understood that.
30年代にそれは普通で 理解できたが
01:31
But I didn't like it. And I didn't agree with it.
私は賛成しなかった
01:34
And I wanted to come up with something that I hoped could make me a better teacher,
望むような良い教師になれて生徒に慕ってもらえるような
01:36
and give the youngsters under my supervision --
何かが欲しくて
01:39
whether it be in athletics or in the English classroom --
体育でも英語の授業でも
01:41
something to which to aspire,
成績以外に
01:44
other than just a higher mark
目標と出来る何かが
01:46
in the classroom, or more points in some athletic contest.
教室でも、大会でも通用するような何かが
01:49
I thought about that for quite a spell,
しばらくの間考えて
01:52
and I wanted to come up with my own definition. I thought that might help.
自分なりの定義を造ってみた
01:55
And I knew how Mr. Webster defined it:
ウェブスターの定義は知っていたが
01:58
as the accumulation of material possessions
物質的財産の蓄積だとか
02:01
or the attainment of a position of power or prestige, or something of that sort --
権力や名声の類いのことだ
02:03
worthy accomplishments perhaps,
それらはもちろん価値あることだが
02:07
but in my opinion not necessarily indicative of success.
私には成功を導くものとは限らない
02:09
So I wanted to come up with something of my own.
だから私なりの定義が必要だった
02:13
And I recalled -- I was raised on a small farm in Southern Indiana
南インディアナの小さな農園で育ち
02:15
and Dad tried to teach me and my brothers
父は、私と兄弟に
02:19
that you should never try to be better than someone else.
「人よりも上に立とうとしてはいけない」と教えた
02:21
I'm sure at the time he did that, I didn't -- it didn't --
父は確かにそう言ったが
02:24
well, somewhere, I guess in the hidden recesses of mind,
ずっと私は忘れていて
02:28
it popped out years later.
あとになって思い出された
02:31
Never try to be better than someone else,
決して人の上に立つな
02:33
always learn from others. Never cease
いつも他人から学び、諦めず
02:35
trying to be the best you can be -- that's under your control.
自分のベストを目指す--自分の力で
02:38
If you get too engrossed and involved and concerned
自分の力で出来ない事に
02:40
in regard to the things over which you have no control,
夢中になったり 悩んだら
02:43
it will adversely affect the things over which you have control.
それが自身の価値にまで影響してくる
02:45
Then I ran across this simple verse that said,
それから 私はこんな話に出会った
02:49
"At God's footstool to confess, a poor soul knelt, and bowed his head.
「神の御前で 打ちひしがれて跪き
02:52
'I failed!' He cried.
『私は負け犬だ』
02:55
The Master said, 'Thou didst thy best, that is success.'"
と嘆く男に 神は『汝の最善が成功だ』と諭した」
02:57
From those things, and one other perhaps,
こんな事を考え合わせて
03:02
I coined my own definition of success,
私の成功の定義を造り出した
03:04
which is: peace of mind attained only through
つまり 人は自分の能力の範囲での
03:06
self-satisfaction in knowing you made the effort to do the best
ベストを尽くした時に 自己を満たす
03:09
of which you're capable.
ことが出来る
03:12
I believe that's true. If you make the effort
本当だ 努力すれば
03:14
to do the best of which you're capable, to try and improve the situation
出来る限り 一生懸命に己を
03:16
that exists for you, I think that's success.
改善しようとする これが成功だ
03:19
And I don't think others can judge that. I think it's like character and reputation.
誰も批判できない成功 「性格」と「評判」が私たちにはついてまわる
03:22
Your reputation is what you are perceived to be;
「評判」は己のこうあるべき姿
03:25
your character is what you really are.
「性格」は本当の自分
03:28
And I think that character is much more
「性格」の方がずっと意味がある
03:30
important than what you are perceived to be.
こうある「べき」より姿よりね
03:33
You'd hope they'd both be good,
もちろん どちらも良くしたい
03:35
but they won't necessarily be the same.
でも 両方が同じとは限らない
03:37
Well, that was my idea that I was going to try to get across to the youngsters.
そう これが若者達と分かち合いたいことだ
03:40
I ran across other things. I love to teach,
他の事もある 私は教えるのが好きだ
03:44
and it was mentioned by the previous speaker
さっきの人も言っていたが
03:46
that I enjoy poetry, and I dabble in it a bit, and love it.
私はには詩の趣味がある
03:51
There are some things that helped me, I think,
私に救いの手を伸ばしてくれるんだ
03:53
be better than I would have been. I know I'm not what I ought to be,
より良くなるために あるべき姿ではないのは分かっているが
03:56
not what I should be. But I think I'm better than I would have been
前の自分よりは確かに良くなっている
03:59
if I hadn't run across certain things.
詩に出会わなかったらもっと違っていたかもしれない
04:02
One was just a little verse that said,
こんな詩がある
04:04
"No written word, no spoken plea
「紙の上の文字にも 口からでる言い訳にも
04:07
can teach our youth what they should be.
若者が学ぶことはない
04:12
Nor all the books on all the shelves --
本棚に並ぶ本も違う
04:15
it's what the teachers are themselves."
若者は 教師の背中を見ているのだから」
04:17
That made an impression on me
1930年代の私には
04:19
in the 1930s.
衝撃的だった
04:21
And I tried to use that more or less in my teaching,
私は教壇で実践することにした
04:24
whether it be in sports, or whether it be in the English classroom.
体育でも英語の授業でも
04:27
I love poetry and always had an interest in that somehow.
私はいつも詩が好きだった
04:34
Maybe it's because Dad used to read to us at night.
たぶん父が語り聞かせてくれたおかげだ
04:38
Coal oil lamp -- we didn't have electricity
ランプを灯して--電気はなかったからね
04:42
in our farm home.
農場の家で
04:44
And Dad would read poetry to us. So I always liked it.
父は詩を読み聞かせてくれた
04:47
And about the same time I ran across this one verse,
だから詩に1行また1行と出会った
04:49
I ran across another one. Someone asked
あるとき誰かが女性教師に
04:52
a lady teacher why she taught.
教師になった理由を聞いた
04:54
And she -- after some time, she said she wanted to think about that.
彼女は少し考えて
04:57
Then she came up and said,
そして彼女は
05:00
"They ask me why I teach
「教師になった理由を聞かれたので
05:02
and I reply, 'Where could I find such splendid company?'
『他にこんな素晴らしい仲間はいないでしょう?』
05:04
There sits a statesman, strong, unbiased, wise;
強くて実直で賢い 雄弁な
05:08
another Daniel Webster, silver-tongued.
ウェブスターの生まれ変わりもいれば
05:11
A doctor sits beside him,
その横にはお医者様もいます
05:13
whose quick steady hand may mend a bone,
その有能な手で
05:15
or stem the life-blood's flow.
骨や血流を修繕する
05:17
And there a builder. Upward rise the arch of a church he builds,
大工は 教会を建て
05:20
wherein that minister may speak the word of God
そこで 牧師は神の言葉を語る
05:23
and lead a stumbling soul to touch the Christ.
そして迷える者を神のもとへと導く
05:25
And all about a gathering of teachers,
彼らは全て教師 農夫
05:28
farmers, merchants, laborers:
商人や労働者の集まり
05:30
those who work and vote and build and plan and pray into a great tomorrow.
皆より良い明日のために働き 闘い 造り 考え そして祈る
05:32
And I may say, I may not see the church,
私は出来上がった協会を見る事はないかもしれない
05:36
or hear the word or eat the food their hands may grow.
その言葉を聞く事も 食べ物を口にする事も
05:40
But yet again I may. And later I may say,
しかし 私は何度でも申します
05:42
I knew him once, and he was weak, or strong,
彼らのことは知っている 弱くて強い
05:45
or bold or proud or gay.
勇敢で 誇りにみち のんきな子たち
05:47
I knew him once, but then he was a boy.
私が知る子どもたち
05:49
They ask me why I teach and I reply,
教師になった理由を聞かれました
05:51
'Where could I find such splendid company?'"
『他にこんな素晴らしい仲間はいないでしょう?』」
05:53
And I believe the teaching profession --
教師という仕事は
05:56
it's true, you have so many youngsters.
若者たちを目の前にする
05:58
And I've got to think of my youngsters at UCLA --
UCLAの生徒たちのなかには
06:00
30-some attorneys, 11 dentists and doctors,
30以上の弁護士 歯医者と医者は11人
06:02
many, many teachers and other professions.
多くの教師も 他の仕事に就いた者もいる
06:07
And that gives you a great deal of pleasure,
彼らの成長を見るのは
06:11
to see them go on.
これ以上無い喜びだ
06:14
I always tried to make the youngsters feel
いつも生徒たちに言いきかせた
06:17
that they're there to get an education, number one.
教育を受けることがまずは第一
06:19
Basketball was second, because it was paying their way,
バスケは二の次にして 生きる力をつける
06:21
and they do need a little time for social activities,
社会活動にも多少の時間をさく
06:23
but you let social activities take a little precedence over the other two
他の二つよりは優先させるが
06:26
and you're not going to have any very long.
それほど長続きしない
06:29
So that was the ideas that I tried to get across
私は生徒たちにこの考えを
06:32
to the youngsters under my supervision.
わかってもらいたかった
06:37
I had three rules, pretty much, that I stuck with practically all the time.
私には3つのルールがある
06:39
I'd learned these prior to coming to UCLA,
UCLAに来る前に学んだことで
06:43
and I decided they were very important.
いつも大切にしてきた
06:45
One was -- never be late. Never be late.
1つ目は-- 絶対に 絶対遅刻はいけない
06:47
Later on I said certain things --
いつも選手にこう言っていた
06:52
I had -- players, if we're leaving for somewhere, had to be neat and clean.
遠征に行くときは 常にキチンとした格好をすること
06:55
There was a time when I made them wear jackets and shirts and ties.
ある時はジャケット シャツにネクタイまでさせたのに
07:00
Then I saw our chancellor coming to school
校長先生がジーンズに
07:06
in denims and turtlenecks, and I thought,
タートルネックで来ていたから
07:08
not right for me to keep this other.
少しやり過ぎたと気づいた
07:12
So I let them -- just they had to be neat and clean.
ただ-- 少なくともキチンとしているように言った
07:14
I had one of my greatest players that you probably heard of,
私のチームにはビル・ウオルトンという
07:17
Bill Walton. He came to catch the bus;
有名な選手がいたが ある時バスに乗り遅れそうになった
07:21
we were leaving for somewhere to play.
遠征にでかけるときだった
07:23
And he wasn't clean and neat, so I wouldn't let him go.
彼はキチンとしていなかったから バスには乗せなかった
07:25
He couldn't get on the bus. He had to go home and get cleaned up
乗れなかった彼は 家に帰って着替え
07:29
to get to the airport.
空港に向かった
07:32
So I was a stickler for that. I believed in that.
自分の信念には頑固なんだ
07:34
I believe in time -- very important.
時間は大切だ とてもね
07:37
I believe you should be on time. But I felt at practice, for example,
時間厳守であるべきだ 例えば
07:39
we start on time, we close on time.
練習は時間通りに始まり終わる
07:42
The youngsters didn't have to feel that we were going to keep them over.
だからダラダラと長引く心配はない
07:44
When I speak at coaching clinics, I often tell
コーチ養成学校で良く言うのは
07:48
young coaches -- and at coaching clinics, more or less,
特に若いコーチたち--
07:50
they'll be the younger coaches getting in the profession.
最近はだんだん若いコーチが増えてきたのだけど
07:53
Most of them are young, you know, and probably newly married.
大体若いコーチは新婚なことが多い
07:56
And I tell them, "Don't run practices late.
それで「練習は延長するな
07:59
Because you'll go home in a bad mood.
イライラしながら家に帰ることなるぞ
08:02
And that's not good, for a young married man to go home in a bad mood.
イライラして帰るのは 特に新婚には好ましくない」と言うんだ
08:05
When you get older, it doesn't make any difference." But --
まあ 年を取れば大した問題ではなくなるが...
08:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:10
So I did believe on time. I believe starting on time,
時間は大切だ 開始時間も
08:15
and I believe closing on time.
終了時間も
08:17
And another one I had was, not one word of profanity.
2つ目が-- 汚い言葉は使うな
08:19
One word of profanity, and you are out of here for the day.
一言でも暴言を吐いたら 一日追放だ
08:22
If I see it in a game, you're going to come out and sit on the bench.
ゲーム中なら 即退場でベンチに座っているだけだ
08:27
And the third one was, never criticize a teammate.
3つ目はーチームメイトを批判してはいけない
08:30
I didn't want that. I used to tell them I was paid to do that.
とにかく嫌だった 私の場合はお金をもらって生徒を批判する
08:33
That's my job. I'm paid to do it. Pitifully poor, but I am paid to do it.
それが仕事だから 薄給だったけど お金をもらっているのだから
08:36
Not like the coaches today, for gracious sakes, no.
最近のコーチみたいに高給取りじゃなかった
08:40
It's a little different than it was in my day.
あの頃は多少違っていた
08:43
Those were three things that I stuck with pretty closely all the time.
これが常に私が大切にしていた3つのこと
08:46
And those actually came from my dad.
これは実は私の父から教えられた
08:50
That's what he tried to teach me and my brothers at one time.
父が私たち兄弟に教えたこと
08:53
I came up with a pyramid eventually,
随分後になってこのようなピラミッドを
08:58
that I don't have the time to go on that.
考えだし 詳しくは話さないが
09:01
But that helped me, I think, become a better teacher.
これが教師を志す私の救いだった
09:03
It's something like this:
そうですね
09:07
And I had blocks in the pyramid,
ピラミッドは個々のブロックの積み重なりだ
09:09
and the cornerstones being industriousness and enthusiasm,
土台は勤勉さと熱意
09:11
working hard and enjoying what you're doing,
一生懸命に働き 楽しむことで
09:15
coming up to the apex
頂点に近づく
09:17
according to my definition of success.
私の成功の定義によれば
09:19
And right at the top -- faith and patience.
そして頂点には 誠実さと忍耐力
09:22
And I say to you, in whatever you're doing,
つまり 何をやっていようとも
09:24
you must be patient. You have to have patience to --
忍耐強くなくてはいけない 忍耐力は
09:26
we want things to happen. We talk about our youth being impatient a lot.
成功へと導いてくれる 若いときには難しくて
09:29
And they are. They want to change everything.
すぐに変化を求めたがるものだ
09:35
They think all change is progress.
変化は進歩だと思いがちだからね
09:37
And we get a little older -- we sort of let things go.
それが少し歳をとると 物事をなるようにまかせ
09:39
And we forget there is no progress without change.
変化が進歩だと思わなくなる
09:41
So you must have patience.
だから我慢強くなくてはいけない
09:43
And I believe that we must have faith.
それから誠実であること
09:45
I believe that we must believe,
大事なことは信じることだ
09:47
truly believe. Not just give it word service;
本当に信じる 口先だけでなく
09:49
believe that things will work out as they should,
全ては上手くいくと信じること
09:52
providing we do what we should.
そこから何をすべきか見えてくる
09:55
I think our tendency is to hope that things will turn out the way we want them to
多くの場合 自分の思うように物事は好転すると考えやすい
09:57
much of the time. But we don't do the things that are necessary
それなのに 本当にやるべきことは
10:01
to make those things become reality.
避けて通ろうとしがちなのだ
10:06
I worked on this for some 14 years,
私はこんな事を14年間も考え
10:10
and I think it helped me become a better teacher.
結局は 良き教師となる助けとなった
10:12
But it all revolved around that original definition of success.
しかし最後には 成功の定義に戻る
10:15
You know a number of years ago, there was a Major
随分前に ジョージ・モリアティという
10:19
League Baseball umpire by the name of George Moriarty.
審判がMLBにいた
10:22
He spelled Moriarty with only one 'i'.
モリアティのスペルは i ひとつだ
10:25
I'd never seen that before, but he did.
そんなスペルは見たことなかった
10:28
Big league baseball players --
バスケの大リーグ選手は
10:30
they're very perceptive about those things,
そんな事には敏感で
10:32
and they noticed he had only one 'i' in his name.
モリアティには i が一つと気づいていた
10:34
You'd be surprised how many also told him
驚くべきことに 多くの人が
10:37
that that was one more than he had in his head
彼の頭にあるよりも一つ多いと
10:40
at various times.
言ったものだ
10:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:44
But he wrote something that I think he did
しかし 彼は私がピラミッドを実践している時
10:46
while I tried to do in this pyramid. He called it "The Road Ahead,
私が思ったとおりに書いた「目の前の道と
10:48
or the Road Behind."
背後の道」と題した
10:50
"Sometimes I think the Fates must
「ときどき運命の女神は
10:52
grin as we denounce them and insist
敗北を運命のせいにして責め立てても
10:54
the only reason we can't win, is the Fates themselves that miss.
にこやかに笑わなくては 運命の女神の存在を疑われても
10:56
Yet there lives on the ancient claim:
昔から言ったものだ
11:00
we win or lose within ourselves. The shining trophies on our shelves
勝ち負けに自分は関係ない 頭上に光るトロフィは
11:02
can never win tomorrow's game.
明日の勝利をもたらしてはくれない
11:05
You and I know deeper down, there's always a chance to win the crown.
よくわかっているのだ いつも勝利のチャンスは転がっている
11:07
But when we fail to give our best,
でも 力を尽くせなかったとしたら
11:10
we simply haven't met the test, of giving all
勝利のために全身全霊をかける
11:12
and saving none until the game is really won;
機会に出逢わなかっただけなのだ
11:14
of showing what is meant by grit;
根性のかけらを見せる機会に
11:16
of playing through when others quit;
他がやめても続ける機会に
11:18
of playing through, not letting up.
気が済むまで続けられる機会に
11:21
It's bearing down that wins the cup. Of dreaming there's a goal ahead;
勝利を手にするまで力を尽くすーゴールを目指して
11:23
of hoping when our dreams are dead;
夢やぶれるのを願い
11:25
of praying when our hopes have fled.
希望がさるのを祈り
11:27
Yet losing, not afraid to fall,
しかし負ける 落ちる事は怖くない
11:29
if bravely we have given all. For who can ask more of a man
全てを投げ出す勇気があればね 自分がもてる
11:32
than giving all within his span.
以上を求める者
11:35
Giving all, it seems to me, is not so far from victory.
全てを差し出せば 勝利は遠くない
11:37
And so the fates are seldom wrong, no matter how they twist and wind.
だから運命は時々間違える どんなに工夫しても
11:42
It's you and I who make our fates --
運命はあなたと私の手の中にある--
11:45
we open up or close the gates on the road ahead or the road behind."
目の前にある道への扉を開くのも閉じるのも我々だ」
11:48
Reminds me of another set of threes that my dad tried to get across to us.
父が私たちに教えてくれたことを思い出させる
11:52
Don't whine. Don't complain. Don't make excuses.
愚痴るな 文句をいうな 言い訳するな
11:55
Just get out there, and whatever you're doing,
何をしていようと 外へ飛び出すのだ
11:58
do it to the best of your ability.
出来る限りをつくす
12:00
And no one can do more than that.
誰もそれ以上できないのだから
12:02
I tried to get across, too, that --
誰も気づかなかったろうが
12:05
my opponents don't tell you -- you never heard me mention winning.
私は「勝利」を口にした事はない
12:08
Never mention winning. My idea is
「勝利」は口にするな
12:11
that you can lose when you outscore somebody in a game.
相手より多く点をとっても試合に負けることもあるし
12:13
And you can win when you're outscored.
点が低い時にでも勝つことはある
12:18
I've felt that way on certain occasions,
様々な機会に
12:20
at various times.
そう考えさせる場面があった
12:22
And I just wanted them to be able to
私は選手達に試合後
12:24
hold their head up after a game.
顔をあげていてほしかった
12:27
I used to say that when a game is over,
いつもこう言っていた「試合が終わって
12:29
and you see somebody that didn't know the outcome,
結果を知らない人に会っても
12:32
I hope they couldn't tell by your actions
選手達の顔色から結果を知られないように
12:34
whether you outscored an opponent or the opponent outscored you.
どちらが多く点をとっていようと関係ない
12:37
That's what really matters: if you make effort
これは本当に大切な事だ 出来る限り
12:43
to do the best you can regularly,
努力したなばら
12:45
the results will be about what they should be.
結果は自ずとついてくるものだ」
12:48
Not necessary to what you would want them to be,
自分がどうなりたいかではなく
12:51
but they will be about what they should,
どうあるべきか
12:53
and only you will know whether you can do that.
そして それが可能か
12:55
And that's what I wanted from them more than anything else.
私はそのことだけを願っていた
12:57
And as time went by, and I learned more about other things,
時がたつにつれて 他にも気づくことがあった
13:00
I think it worked a little better,
結果はだんだんと
13:03
as far as the results. But I wanted the score of a game to be
よくなっていった 試合の点数は
13:06
the byproduct of these other things,
単なる副産物で
13:09
and not the end itself.
真の結果ではない
13:12
I believe it was --
信じているのは
13:14
one great philosopher said -- no, no,
ある哲学者がーあの
13:18
Cervantes. Cervantes said,
そう セルバンテスは
13:21
"The journey is better than the end."
「旅路は目的地よりもよい」と言った
13:23
And I like that. I think that is --
これは気に入ったよ
13:28
it's getting there. Sometimes when you get there, there's almost a letdown.
辿り着く道のり 到着してしまうとがっかりする事が多い
13:30
But there's getting there that's the fun.
でも そこまでの道のりが楽しい
13:34
I liked our -- as a basketball coach at UCLA I liked our practices to be the journey,
UCLAのコーチをしていて 練習しているときが一番だった
13:36
and the game would be the end. The end result.
試合が来ると終わり 終わりの結果だけだ
13:41
I'd like to go up and sit in the stands and watch the players play,
ただスタンドに座って選手のプレーを見守るだけだ
13:44
and see whether I'd done a decent job
それでこれまでの仕事の意味がわかる
13:47
during the week.
その一週間のね
13:50
There again, it's getting the players to get that self-satisfaction,
だから 選手は自己満足を覚え
13:52
in knowing that they'd made the effort to do
それまでの努力も
13:55
the best of which they are capable.
にじみでる
13:58
Sometimes I'm asked who was
ときどき選手達は
14:04
the best player I had, or the best teams.
誰が一番か聞いてきたけど
14:07
I can never answer that,
私は答えられなかった
14:09
as far as the individuals are concerned.
ひとりひとりのことを考えると
14:12
I was asked one time about that,
ある時
14:15
and they said, "Suppose that you in some way could
誰かが「もしもベスト選手を
14:18
make the perfect player. What would you want?"
選ぶとしたら、どんな選手ですか?」ときいてきた
14:23
And I said, "Well, I'd want one that knew why he was at UCLA:
それで私は「どうして自分がUCLAにいるか知っている者
14:25
to get an education, he was a good student,
教育を受けるには 彼は一番だ
14:28
really knew why he was there in the first place.
どうしてそこにいるか知っている
14:31
But I'd want one that could play, too.
しかし 彼には同時によい選手であってほしい
14:33
I'd want one to realize that
考えてほしいのは
14:35
defense usually wins championships, and would work hard on defense.
ディフェンダーはチャンピオンシップを勝ち取る
14:38
But I'd want one that would play offense too.
しかし 攻撃型でなくてもいけない
14:41
I'd want him to be unselfish,
利己主義ではいけないのだよ
14:44
and look for the pass first and not shoot all the time.
シュートをうつことよりも つなげる事が大切だ
14:46
And I'd want one that could pass and would pass.
パスができ、パスをするもの
14:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:52
I've had some that could and wouldn't,
できるがしない人もいる
14:53
and I've had some that would and couldn't.
するが出来ない人もいる
14:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:57
I wanted them to be able to shoot from the outside.
ゾーンの外からでもシュートできること
15:01
I wanted them to be good inside too.
それからゾーンの内からも
15:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:06
I'd want them to be able to rebound well at both ends, too.
リバウンドもうまくなくては
15:09
And why not just take someone like Keith Wilkes and let it go at that.
キース・ウィルキスみたいな選手
15:13
He had the qualifications. Not the only one,
彼はすばらしい選手だった 彼だけではないけど
15:17
but he was one that I used in that
彼のことを私は
15:19
particular category, because I think he
高く評価した なぜなら
15:22
made the effort to become the best [unclear].
彼は一番になる努力していたからね
15:25
I mention in my book, "They Call Me Coach."
私の著書「コーチと呼ばれて」で
15:28
Two players that gave me great satisfaction;
二人の優秀な選手のことをあげた
15:31
that came as close as I think anyone I ever had to reach their full potential:
私が知っている限りではベストな選手
15:33
one was Conrad Burke. And one was Doug McIntosh.
コンラッド・ビュルケとドッグ・マクルトッシュだ
15:36
When I saw them as freshmen,
一年生のとき
15:39
on our freshmen team --
新しチームで
15:41
we didn't have -- freshmen couldn't play varsity when I taught.
あの頃一年生に優秀なのはいなかった--
15:43
And I thought, "Oh gracious, if these two players, either one of them" --
私は「もし この二人のうち 一人でも
15:46
they were different years, but I thought about each one at the time he was there --
同じ歳にうまれていなかったら」って
15:49
"Oh, if he ever makes the varsity,
でも「もしこの選手が学校代表チームを作ったなら
15:52
our varsity must be pretty miserable, if he's good enough to make it."
そのチームは散々なことになる」とも
15:55
And you know one of them
ご存知のとおり
15:58
was a starting player for a season and a half.
そのうち一人がスターティングメンバーになって
16:01
The other was -- his next year, he played
もう独りは次のとしに出場
16:04
32 minutes in a national championship game,
ナショナルチャンピオンに32分間も
16:07
did a tremendous job for us. And the next year, he was a starting player
本当にすばらしかった 次の年にはスターティングメンバーだ
16:10
on the national championship team.
ナショナルチャンピオンチームのね
16:14
And here I thought he'd never play a minute, when he was --
でも 彼は一分たりとも私たちの試合に出れなかった
16:16
so those are the things that give you great joy,
だから私は本当に嬉しかったし
16:18
and great satisfaction to see one.
満足だった
16:22
Neither one of those youngsters could shoot very well.
どちらもシュートが上手いわけではなかった
16:25
But they had outstanding shooting percentages,
しかし シュートの確立は高かった
16:28
because they didn't force it.
なぜなら 無理をしなかったから
16:30
And neither one could jump very well,
ジャンプもダメだった
16:32
but they got -- kept good position,
しかし いつも良いポジションをおさえ
16:35
and so they did well rebounding. They remembered that
だからリバウンドも良かった 彼らは
16:37
every shot that is taken, they assumed would be missed.
どのシュートも外れると思っていたし
16:40
I've had too many that stand around and wait to see if it's missed,
みんな私の周りでは外れるのを待っていた
16:42
then they go and it's too late.
それから動き出しが遅すぎる
16:44
Somebody else is in there ahead of them.
すでに他の選手が立ちふさがっている
16:46
And they weren't very quick, but they played good position,
素早くもなかったし なのにいつもよいポジションにいた
16:50
kept in good balance.
バランスが良かったね
16:52
And so they played pretty good defense for us.
だからディフェンスはいつもよかった
16:54
So they had qualities that -- they came close to --
この二人の選手はいつもできるだけ
16:56
as close to reaching possibly their full potential
自分の能力を発揮できるポジションに近づいた
16:59
as any players I ever had.
他の誰よりも
17:03
So I consider them to be as successful as
だから私にとって二人は
17:05
Lewis Alcindor or Bill Walton,
ルイス・アルシンダやビル・ウオルトンと同じだ
17:07
or many of the others that we had, There was some outstanding -- some outstanding players.
他の素晴しい選手達にも劣らない
17:12
Have I rambled enough?
取り留めのない話だったかな
17:18
I was told that when he makes his appearance, I was supposed to shut up.
彼がきたから そろそろ口を閉じる時間だね
17:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:25
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:26
Translated by Tomoko Tsubaki
Reviewed by Hiroaki Nakanishi

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About the speaker:

John Wooden - Coach
John Wooden, affectionately known as Coach, led UCLA to record wins that are still unmatched in the world of basketball. Throughout his long life, he shared the values and life lessons he passed to his players, emphasizing success that’s about much more than winning.

Why you should listen

Born in 1910, Coach John Wooden was the first person to be inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame both as a player and coach, while ESPN ranks him as the greatest coach of all time, across all sports. In his 40 years at UCLA, he mentored legends such as Bill Walton and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. He has created a model, the Pyramid of Success, and authored several books to impart his insight on achievement to others.

Coach wanted his players to be victors in life and not just on the court, so he treated them as an extended family and emphasized that winning was more than scoring. Indeed, most of his inspiring theories were born from conversations with his father, as a boy on their farm in Indiana. One that sums up his ideology quite well is his often-quoted definition of success: "Success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you made the effort to become the best that you are capable of becoming."

More profile about the speaker
John Wooden | Speaker | TED.com