sponsored links
TEDxHousesOfParliament

Rory Stewart: Why democracy matters

ローリー・スチュアート「民主主義はなぜ大事なのか」

June 12, 2012

イギリスの国会議員であるローリー・スチュアートは「市民は民主主義への信頼を失いつつある」と主張します。イラクやアフガニスタンに出来た民主主義は機能しておらず、84%のイギリス国民は自国の政治は崩壊していると考えています。ローリー・スチュアートが目指すのは「手段」ではなく「理想」として民主主義を再建すること、そしてその重要性が市民に認識されることです。

Rory Stewart - Politician
Rory Stewart -- a perpetual pedestrian, a diplomat, an adventurer and an author -- is the member of British Parliament for Penrith and the Border. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So little Billy goes to school,
あるところに ビリーという子がいました
00:16
and he sits down and the teacher says,
学校で先生はビリーに聞きました
00:18
"What does your father do?"
「お父さんのお仕事はなあに?」
00:21
And little Billy says, "My father plays the piano
ビリーはこう答えました
「お父さんはピアノを弾いているよ
00:24
in an opium den."
麻薬サロンで」
00:28
So the teacher rings up the parents, and says,
先生はびっくりして 家に電話をかけました
00:31
"Very shocking story from little Billy today.
「今日 息子さんからお聞きして驚いたのですが
00:33
Just heard that he claimed that you play the piano
お父さんの職業はピアニストなのですか?
00:36
in an opium den."
麻薬サロンの」
00:40
And the father says, "I'm very sorry. Yes, it's true, I lied.
父親は言いました
「すみません もちろん全くのウソです」
00:42
But how can I tell an eight-year-old boy
でも8歳の男の子に
00:46
that his father is a politician?" (Laughter)
父親が政治家だなんて
説明できないですよね」(笑)
00:50
Now, as a politician myself, standing in front of you,
私も政治家ですが
この様な場でも
00:54
or indeed, meeting any stranger anywhere in the world,
実のところ 世界のどこで誰に会っても
00:57
when I eventually reveal the nature of my profession,
私が職業を明かすと
01:01
they look at me as though I'm somewhere between
変な目を向けられます
まるで私が
01:03
a snake, a monkey and an iguana,
蛇・猿・イグアナの合わさった
気味の悪い何かであるかのように
01:07
and through all of this, I feel, strongly,
こういう経験を通して強く感じるのは
01:11
that something is going wrong.
何かが間違っているということです
01:15
Four hundred years of maturing democracy,
民主主義が誕生して400年になります
01:18
colleagues in Parliament who seem to me, as individuals,
国会で働く議員たちは 私から見ると
01:21
reasonably impressive, an increasingly educated,
皆 すばらしく 学歴も優秀です
01:24
energetic, informed population, and yet
国民の教養 エネルギー 学識も
高まりつつあります それなのに
01:28
a deep, deep sense of disappointment.
この国は 深い深い失望に陥っています
01:33
My colleagues in Parliament include, in my new intake,
新しく議員になる人の中には
01:37
family doctors, businesspeople, professors,
医者、実業家、教授
01:41
distinguished economists, historians, writers,
著名な経済学者、歴史家、作家
01:46
army officers ranging from colonels down to regimental sergeant majors.
大佐から特務曹長にいたる
あらゆる軍の関係者などがいます
01:50
All of them, however, including myself, as we walk underneath
しかし 私を含め 国会議員は皆
01:55
those strange stone gargoyles just down the road,
国会を出て この古い建物の横を通るとき
01:59
feel that we've become less than the sum of our parts,
ふと 自分の無力さを感じ
02:03
feel as though we have become profoundly diminished.
まるで自分が消えてしまうような
そんな気持ちになるのです
02:07
And this isn't just a problem in Britain.
そしてこれはイギリスだけの問題ではありません
02:13
It's a problem across the developing world,
発展途上国の至るところでも問題になっており
02:17
and in middle income countries too. In Jamaica,
中所得国でも同様です ジャマイカでは…
02:20
for example -- look at Jamaican members of Parliament,
例えばジャマイカの国会議員ですが
02:22
you meet them, and they're often people who are
彼らはたいていこんな人達です
02:26
Rhodes Scholars, who've studied at Harvard or at Princeton,
ローズ奨学生として
アメリカの一流大学を卒業した優等生たち
02:29
and yet, you go down to downtown Kingston,
しかしジャマイカの首都の中心には
02:34
and you are looking at one of the most depressing sites
とても悲惨な光景が広がっています
02:37
that you can see in any middle-income country in the world:
世界中の中所得国で見られる光景ですが
02:41
a dismal, depressing landscape
ぼろぼろの 半分廃墟と化した
建物の並ぶ
02:45
of burnt and half-abandoned buildings.
ひどい光景なのです
02:48
And this has been true for 30 years, and the handover
過去30年間こうなのです
02:51
in 1979, 1980, between one Jamaican leader who was
1980年にエリート家族出身の党首が
02:54
the son of a Rhodes Scholar and a Q.C. to another
ハーバード出身の経済学博士である党首と
02:58
who'd done an economics doctorate at Harvard,
政権交代した頃には
03:02
over 800 people were killed in the streets
麻薬をめぐる争いにより この街で
03:05
in drug-related violence.
800人以上が殺されました
03:08
Ten years ago, however, the promise of democracy
しかし10年前には
民主主義への期待が
03:11
seemed to be extraordinary. George W. Bush stood up
非常に高まっているように思えました
ブッシュ前米大統領は
03:15
in his State of the Union address in 2003
2003年の一般教書演説で
03:19
and said that democracy was the force that would beat
民主主義は世界にはびこる悪を滅ぼす
03:22
most of the ills of the world. He said,
唯一の力であると国民に呼びかけました
03:26
because democratic governments respect their own people
民主的な政府は 人民を尊重し
03:29
and respect their neighbors, freedom will bring peace.
隣国を尊重し
自由は平和をもたらすと言うのです
03:33
Distinguished academics at the same time argued that
当時の著名な学者たちも 民主化により
03:39
democracies had this incredible range of side benefits.
様々な便益がもたらされると賛同しました
03:42
They would bring prosperity, security,
民主化は繁栄や安全をもたらし
03:46
overcome sectarian violence,
宗派の争いをなくし
03:49
ensure that states would never again harbor terrorists.
テロリストを守る政府はなくなると考えたのです
03:52
Since then, what's happened?
でも現実は違いました
03:57
Well, what we've seen is the creation, in places like Iraq
これまで イラクやアフガニスタンで
03:59
and Afghanistan, of democratic systems of government
民主主義の政府が生まれましたが
04:02
which haven't had any of those side benefits.
まだ これらの便益をもたらしてはいません
04:06
In Afghanistan, for example, we haven't just had one election
アフガニスタンでは 選挙を行うことに
04:09
or two elections. We've gone through three elections,
成功しています
それも大統領選挙 議員選挙を含む
04:12
presidential and parliamentary. And what do we find?
3回もの選挙です
では 選挙は何をもたらしましたか?
04:15
Do we find a flourishing civil society, a vigorous rule of law
社会は繁栄し 法は整備され
04:18
and good security? No. What we find in Afghanistan
安全は確保されたでしょうか?
答えは No です
04:21
is a judiciary that is weak and corrupt,
国家の法制度は機能しておらず
汚職は横行し
04:25
a very limited civil society which is largely ineffective,
市民社会と呼べるようなものは
ほとんど存在せず
04:29
a media which is beginning to get onto its feet
メディアは独立しつつありますが
04:33
but a government that's deeply unpopular,
腐敗したと見なされる政府に対する
04:36
perceived as being deeply corrupt, and security
国民の不満はいまだに大きく
04:39
that is shocking, security that's terrible.
安全は全く確保されていません とても危険です
04:43
In Pakistan, in lots of sub-Saharan Africa,
パキスタンや
サブサハラ・アフリカの多くの国でも
04:47
again you can see democracy and elections are compatible
民主主義と選挙が
04:51
with corrupt governments, with states that are unstable
腐敗した政府や不安定で
危険な国と共存しています
04:54
and dangerous.
腐敗した政府や不安定で
危険な国と共存しています
04:58
And when I have conversations with people, I remember
私は市民とよく話をしますが
05:01
having a conversation, for example, in Iraq,
以前イラクでこんな出来事がありました
05:03
with a community that asked me
現地の人に こう聞かれました
05:06
whether the riot we were seeing in front of us,
「私達の目の前で 暴徒が
05:09
this was a huge mob ransacking a provincial council building,
政府の建物をめちゃくちゃに荒らしているが
05:12
was a sign of the new democracy.
これが新しい民主主義なのか?」と
05:16
The same, I felt, was true in almost every single one
これまで多くの中所得国や
途上国を訪問しましたが
05:21
of the middle and developing countries that I went to,
どこへいっても同じような問題があります
05:25
and to some extent the same is true of us.
先進国でも同じだと言えるかもしれませんね
05:28
Well, what is the answer to this? Is the answer to just
では どうすればいいのでしょうか
05:32
give up on the idea of democracy?
民主主義を諦めることが正解なのでしょうか
05:35
Well, obviously not. It would be absurd
もちろん違います
05:37
if we were to engage again in the kind of operations
もし イラクやアフガニスタンで
05:41
we were engaged in, in Iraq and Afghanistan
今回のような作戦を再び展開し
05:44
if we were to suddenly find ourselves in a situation
突然 民主主義以外のシステムを
05:47
in which we were imposing
推進するとしたら
05:50
anything other than a democratic system.
そんなの馬鹿げています
05:53
Anything else would run contrary to our values,
民主主義以外は 私達の価値観に反しており
05:55
it would run contrary to the wishes of the people
人々の望むものではなく
05:58
on the ground, it would run contrary to our interests.
また 私達の利害にも反しています
06:00
I remember in Iraq, for example, that we went through
例えば イラクを巡って
06:04
a period of feeling that we should delay democracy.
民主主義の導入を遅らせるべき
ではないかと議論されました
06:07
We went through a period of feeling that the lesson learned
ボスニアでは
選挙を実施するのが早すぎたために
06:10
from Bosnia was that elections held too early
宗派間の闘争や過激派政党が
06:12
enshrined sectarian violence, enshrined extremist parties,
活発になりました
この教訓を生かして
06:16
so in Iraq in 2003 the decision was made,
2003年にイラクの選挙を
06:20
let's not have elections for two years. Let's invest in
2年後に遅らせることが決まりました
06:23
voter education. Let's invest in democratization.
選挙教育や民主化に
力を注いでいこうとしました
06:26
The result was that I found stuck outside my office
その結果なにが起こったでしょうか?
私のオフィスの外では
06:30
a huge crowd of people, this is actually a photograph
群衆が選挙の実施を要求しているのです
06:34
taken in Libya but I saw the same scene in Iraq
これはリビアで撮られた写真ですが
06:36
of people standing outside screaming for the elections,
イラクでも同じ光景に遭遇しました
06:40
and when I went out and said, "What is wrong
私が外に出て「暫定州政府の
06:44
with the interim provincial council?
何が不満なのか?
06:47
What is wrong with the people that we have chosen?
私達が選んだ役人に問題があるのか?
06:50
There is a Sunni sheikh, there's a Shiite sheikh,
スンニ派とシアイ派のリーダーを始め
06:53
there's the seven -- leaders of the seven major tribes,
7つの 大きな部族のリーダーがいて
06:56
there's a Christian, there's a Sabian,
キリスト教徒もいて サービア教徒もいて
06:59
there are female representatives, there's every political party in this council,
女性の代表もいて
すべての政党が議会に存在している
07:02
what's wrong with the people that we chose?"
彼らの何が問題なのか?」と聞きました
07:06
The answer came, "The problem isn't the people
すると彼らは 「選ばれた人が問題なのではない
07:09
that you chose. The problem is that you chose them."
選んだのが あなた達であることが
問題なんだ」と答えました
07:12
I have not met, in Afghanistan, in even the most
アフガニスタンでは
人里離れた集落でも
07:18
remote community, anybody who does not want
誰が自分達を統治するのか決めるのに
07:21
a say in who governs them.
誰もが参加したいと思っています
07:24
Most remote community, I have never met a villager
どんなに辺境の土地に行っても 選挙権はいらないと
07:27
who does not want a vote.
言う人はいませんでした
07:29
So we need to acknowledge
世論調査などで
07:33
that despite the dubious statistics, despite the fact that
こんなデータが得られます
07:36
84 percent of people in Britain feel politics is broken,
84%の英国民が
イギリスの政治は崩壊していると感じており
07:40
despite the fact that when I was in Iraq, we did an opinion poll
2003年にイラクで世論調査を行い
07:45
in 2003 and asked people what political systems they preferred,
どのような政治形態がよいかを聞いたところ
07:48
and the answer came back that
返ってきた答えは
07:52
seven percent wanted the United States,
アメリカが7%
07:55
five percent wanted France,
フランスが5%
07:58
three percent wanted Britain,
イギリスは3%
08:00
and nearly 40 percent wanted Dubai, which is, after all,
40%もの人が
ドバイの政治形態がよいと答えました
08:03
not a democratic state at all but a relatively prosperous
ドバイは君主制を採用する裕福な国で
民主主義ではありません
08:07
minor monarchy, democracy is a thing of value
でも このような数字は気にせずに
民主主義の価値を認め
08:10
for which we should be fighting. But in order to do so
民主主義を守るべきです
でもそのためには
08:15
we need to get away from instrumental arguments.
民主主義を手段として
扱うことをやめるべきでしょう
08:18
We need to get away from saying democracy matters
民主主義の重要性を説くのに
08:21
because of the other things it brings.
その利益を理由にするのはやめましょう
08:25
We need to get away from feeling, in the same way,
人権や女性の権利の重要性も同様に
08:28
human rights matters because of the other things it brings,
人権や女性の権利の重要性も同様に
08:30
or women's rights matters for the other things it brings.
その利益を理由に考えるべきではありません
08:34
Why should we get away from those arguments?
それはなぜか
08:37
Because they're very dangerous. If we set about saying,
なぜならこれらの主張は
とても危険だからです 例えば
08:40
for example, torture is wrong because it doesn't extract
「有益な情報を得ることが出来ないので
拷問は間違っている」という主張や
08:42
good information, or we say, you need women's rights
「労働力が2倍に増えて
経済成長が促されるので
08:47
because it stimulates economic growth by doubling the size of the work force,
女性の権利を認めることは重要だ」
という主張があったとしましょう
08:52
you leave yourself open to the position where
すると 北朝鮮の役人は
08:57
the government of North Korea can turn around and say,
こう言うかもしれません
08:58
"Well actually, we're having a lot of success extracting
「私達は拷問によって多くの有益な情報を
09:00
good information with our torture at the moment,"
得ることができているがね」
09:03
or the government of Saudi Arabia to say, "Well,
サウジアラビアの役人はこう主張するでしょう
09:06
our economic growth's okay, thank you very much,
「おかげさまで私達の経済は順調に成長しているよ
09:08
considerably better than yours,
あなたの国よりよっぽどね
09:09
so maybe we don't need to go ahead with this program on women's rights."
だから女性の権利を認める必要は
ないのではないかな」
09:11
The point about democracy is not instrumental.
民主主義はある目的のための
手段ではありません
09:16
It's not about the things that it brings.
なにをもたらすかは関係ないのです
09:19
The point about democracy is not that it delivers
合理的で効率的な法律を
09:22
legitimate, effective, prosperous rule of law.
つくるためのものでもありません
09:25
It's not that it guarantees peace with itself or with its neighbors.
自国や周辺諸国の平和を
保障するためのものでもありません
09:31
The point about democracy is intrinsic.
民主主義はそれ自体が重要なのです
09:36
Democracy matters because it reflects an idea of equality
公平や自由といった概念を反映し
09:39
and an idea of liberty. It reflects an idea of dignity,
個人の尊厳を認め
09:44
the dignity of the individual, the idea that each individual
公平な選挙権により
09:48
should have an equal vote, an equal say,
一人一人に政府を形成する
権利を保証する
09:52
in the formation of their government.
だから民主主義は重要なのです
09:56
But if we're really to make democracy vigorous again,
もし私達が民主主義にもう一度
10:00
if we're ready to revivify it, we need to get involved
勢いを付けたいと考えるのなら
10:04
in a new project of the citizens and the politicians.
市民や政府の
プロジェクトに参加していく必要があります
10:06
Democracy is not simply a question of structures.
民主主義とは
単なる構造を指すのではありません
10:11
It is a state of mind. It is an activity.
それに対する姿勢であり
行動でもあるのです
10:16
And part of that activity is honesty.
そのひとつは「誠実さ」です
10:20
After I speak to you today, I'm going on a radio program
ここでお話しした後
私は『Any Questions』という
10:23
called "Any Questions," and the thing you will have noticed
ラジオ番組に出演します
お聞きになればお気付きになるでしょう
10:27
about politicians on these kinds of radio programs
こういったラジオ番組で 政治家は
10:29
is that they never, ever say that they don't know the answer
どんな質問にも「わかりません」とは
絶対に答えません
10:33
to a question. It doesn't matter what it is.
何を聞かれてもです
10:37
If you ask about child tax credits, the future of the penguins
子供の税金の控除はどうなるのか
10:38
in the south Antarctic, asked to hold forth on whether or not
南極のペンギンの将来はどうなるのか
10:42
the developments in Chongqing contribute
中国の大都市の成長は
環境問題に どう影響するか
10:46
to sustainable development in carbon capture,
そんな質問を政治家にすると
10:49
and we will have an answer for you.
彼らは必ず何か答えてくれます
10:51
We need to stop that, to stop pretending to be
こんなふうに何でも
知っているふりをするのは
10:54
omniscient beings.
もうやめましょう
10:57
Politicians also need to learn, occasionally, to say that
時には政治家も
10:59
certain things that voters want, certain things that voters
有権者が求めているもの
11:03
have been promised, may be things
有権者と約束したものを
11:06
that we cannot deliver
実現することができない
11:10
or perhaps that we feel we should not deliver.
あるいは実現すべきでないと
言えるようになるべきです
11:13
And the second thing we should do is understand
次に私達がすべきことは 社会の気風を
11:17
the genius of our societies.
理解することです
11:20
Our societies have never been so educated, have never
今 社会は かつてないほど 教養が高く
11:23
been so energized, have never been so healthy,
活力にあふれ 健全で
11:27
have never known so much, cared so much,
何事にも関心や情熱を持って
11:30
or wanted to do so much, and it is a genius of the local.
社会に貢献したいという市民で構成されています
それこそが社会の気風なのです
11:33
One of the reasons why we're moving away
かつては 今 私たちがいるような
11:39
from banqueting halls such as the one in which we stand,
天井に 王位に就いた王などの
11:41
banqueting halls with extraordinary images on the ceiling
素晴らしい絵が飾られた 大きな広間が
11:45
of kings enthroned,
政府の中心でしたが
11:49
the entire drama played out here on this space,
以前 イギリス国王の首が飛ばされた
11:51
where the King of England had his head lopped off,
この歴史的な場所や
11:54
why we've moved from spaces like this, thrones like that,
このような権威の象徴であるような場所から
11:57
towards the town hall, is we're moving more and more
次第に 市庁舎の方
庶民の持つ力により近く
12:02
towards the energies of our people, and we need to tap that.
位置するようになりました
この力をもっと利用する必要があるのです
12:05
That can mean different things in different countries.
この方法は国によって異なるでしょう
12:09
In Britain, it could mean looking to the French,
イギリスの場合 フランスを見習い
12:12
learning from the French,
市長が直接選ばれる
12:15
getting directly elected mayors in place
フランスのコミューン制度を
12:17
in a French commune system.
導入すべきかもしれません
12:21
In Afghanistan, it could have meant instead of concentrating
アフガニスタンの場合は
大統領選挙や議員選挙のような
12:23
on the big presidential and parliamentary elections,
大きな選挙に集中するよりも
12:26
we should have done what was in the Afghan constitution
アフガニスタンに根付いたシステム
12:29
from the very beginning, which is to get direct local elections going
つまり地区レベルで直接選挙を行い
12:31
at a district level and elect people's provincial governors.
州の長を選ぶという方法を
とるべきだったのかもしれません
12:36
But for any of these things to work,
これらが上手く機能するために必要なことは
12:41
the honesty in language, the local democracy,
真摯な言葉でしょうか
地域レベルでの民主主義でしょうか
12:44
it's not just a question of what politicians do.
カギを握っているのは政治家ではありません
12:47
It's a question of what the citizens do.
カギを握っているのは市民です
12:49
For politicians to be honest, the public needs to allow them to be honest,
政治家が正直であるためには
市民の協力が不可欠です
12:52
and the media, which mediates between the politicians
そしてメディアは 政治家と市民とを
12:56
and the public, needs to allow those politicians to be honest.
つなげる役割を果たし
政治家を正直たらしめる必要があります
12:59
If local democracy is to flourish, it is about the active
地域レベルでの民主主義が活発ということは
13:04
and informed engagement of every citizen.
そこに住む 全ての市民が
活発に政治参加しているということです
13:07
In other words, if democracy is to be rebuilt,
つまり もし民主主義が再建され
13:11
is to become again vigorous and vibrant,
もう一度活発な民主主義が達成されるためには
13:16
it is necessary not just for the public
市民が政治家を信頼すること
13:20
to learn to trust their politicians,
そして同時に
13:23
but for the politicians to learn to trust the public.
政治家が市民を信頼することが必要なのです
13:26
Thank you very much indeed. (Applause)
ありがとうございました (拍手)
13:31
Translator:Mizuhiro Suzuki
Reviewer:Jarred Tucker

sponsored links

Rory Stewart - Politician
Rory Stewart -- a perpetual pedestrian, a diplomat, an adventurer and an author -- is the member of British Parliament for Penrith and the Border.

Why you should listen

Now the member of British Parliament for Penrith and the Border, in rural northwest England, Rory Stewart has led a fascinatingly broad life of public service. He joined the Foreign Office after school, then left to begin a years-long series of walks across the Muslim world. In 2002, his extraordinary walk across post-9/11 Afghanistan resulted in his first book, The Places in Between. After the invasion of Iraq in 2003, he served as a Deputy Governorate Co-Ordinator in Southern Iraq for the coalition forces, and later founded a charity in Kabul. 

To secure his Conservative seat in Parliament, he went on a walking tour of Penrith, covering the entire county as he talked to voters. In 2008, Esquire called him one of the 75 most influential people of the 21st century.

He says: "The world isn't one way or another. Things can be changed very, very rapidly by someone with sufficient confidence, sufficient knowledge and sufficient authority." 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.