sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2014

Kimberley Motley: How I defend the rule of law

キンバリー・モトリー: いかに法の支配を守るか

October 10, 2014

人間は皆、その国の法律によって守られるべきです―たとえ、その法律が忘れられ無視されていようとも。アフガニスタンなどで活動するアメリカ人訴訟弁護士キンバリー・モトリーは、国際的な弁護士活動の中から3つの事例を紹介し、その国の法律でどれだけ正義と公正さ―法律をその立法目的である「保護」のために使うこと―をもたらせるか語ります。

Kimberley Motley - International litigator
American lawyer Kimberley Motley is the only Western litigator in Afghanistan's courts; as her practice expands to other countries, she thinks deeply about how to build the capacity of rule of law globally. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Let me tell you a story
これからお話しするのは
00:13
about a little girl named Naghma.
ナグマという少女のことです
00:15
Naghma lived in a refugee camp
ナグマは 難民キャンプで
00:18
with her parents and her eight brothers and sisters.
両親と8人の兄弟姉妹と
暮らしていました
00:20
Every morning, her father would wake up
父親は 毎朝目覚めると
00:23
in the hopes he'd be picked for construction work,
日雇いの工事現場の仕事を求め
00:25
and on a good month he would earn 50 dollars.
良いときで 月の稼ぎは5千円でした
00:27
The winter was very harsh,
ある寒さが厳しい冬のこと
00:31
and unfortunately, Naghma's brother died
不幸にも ナグマの弟が亡くなり
00:32
and her mother became very ill.
母親も重い病気にかかりました
00:35
In desperation, her father went to a neighbor
切羽詰った父親は 近所の人に
00:37
to borrow 2,500 dollars.
25万円の借金をしました
00:39
After several months of waiting,
そのまま数ヶ月が経ち
00:42
the neighbor became very impatient,
しびれを切らした隣人は
00:44
and he demanded that he be paid back.
借金返済を求めました
00:45
Unfortunately, Naghma's
father didn't have the money,
しかし ナグマの父親には
そんなお金はなく
00:48
and so the two men agreed to a jirga.
二人は ジルガに委ねることにしました
00:50
So simply put, a jirga is a form of mediation
ジルガとは
調停のようなもので
00:53
that's used in Afghanistan's
informal justice system.
アフガニスタンで
民間の司法制度として使われ
00:56
It's usually presided over by religious leaders
通常は 宗教指導者や
00:59
and village elders,
村の長老が取り仕切ります
01:02
and jirgas are often used in
rural countries like Afghanistan,
ジグラは
国家制度に根強い反感がある
01:04
where there's deep-seated resentment
アフガニスタンのような
01:07
against the formal system.
農村国家でよく使われます
01:09
At the jirga, the men sat together
さて そのジルガで長老たちが話し合い
01:11
and they decided that the
best way to satisfy the debt
債務を返済する最良の手段として
結論付けたのは
01:14
would be if Naghma married
the neighbor's 21-year-old son.
ナグマを 貸し手の21歳の息子と
結婚させることでした
01:17
She was six.
ナグマはまだ6歳でした
01:21
Now, stories like Naghma's unfortunately
ナグマのような事例は
残念ながら
01:24
are all too common,
枚挙にいとまがありません
01:26
and from the comforts of our home,
恵まれた国にいる私たちは
01:28
we may look at these stories as another
また女性の人権を踏みにじる話かと
01:29
crushing blow to women's rights.
見てしまうでしょうし
01:31
And if you watched Afghanistan on the news,
ニュースでアフガニスタンの話を見れば
01:33
you may have this view that it's a failed state.
とんでもない国だと思うかもしれません
01:36
However, Afghanistan does have a legal system,
でも アフガニスタンには
立派な法制度があります
01:39
and while jirgas are built on
long-standing tribal customs,
ジグラは 長年の部族習慣にもとづき
作られたものですが
01:43
even in jirgas, laws are supposed to be followed,
そのジグラにおいても
法律は守られねばなりません
01:47
and it goes without saying
当然のことながら
01:51
that giving a child to satisfy a debt
債務の返済のために子供を売るのは
01:52
is not only grossly immoral, it's illegal.
人の道に大きく外れているだけでなく
違法なのです
01:55
In 2008, I went to Afghanistan
2008年 私はアフガニスタンに渡り
01:59
for a justice funded program,
司法支援プログラムに参加しました
02:02
and I went there originally
on this nine-month program
このプログラムで9ヶ月間
02:04
to train Afghan lawyers.
現地の弁護士を指導したのです
02:07
In that nine months, I went around the country
その9ヶ月の間
私は国中をまわって
02:09
and I talked to hundreds of
people that were locked up,
何百もの服役囚たちと話し
02:11
and I talked to many businesses
アフガニスタンで事業を展開する
02:14
that were also operating in Afghanistan.
多くの企業とも話をしました
02:15
And within these conversations,
こうした会話をする中で
02:18
I started hearing the connections
そうした企業や人々のつながりを知り
02:19
between the businesses and the people,
そして 彼らを守るべき法律が
02:21
and how laws that were meant to protect them
いかに使われていないかが
02:23
were being underused,
分かり始めました
02:25
while gross and illegal punitive
measures were overused.
一方で 酷く違法な制裁が
まかり通っており
02:27
And so this put me on a quest for justness,
このことが 私を
「公正さ」への追求に駆り立てたのです
02:31
and what justness means to me
公正さとは 私にとって
02:34
is using laws for their intended purpose,
法律を その立法目的通りに使うこと―
02:37
which is to protect.
つまり 保護するために使うことです
02:40
The role of laws is to protect.
法律の役割は 守ることなのです
02:43
So as a result, I decided to
open up a private practice,
ですから 私は
自ら事務所を立上げ
02:46
and I became the first foreigner to litigate
アフガニスタンの法廷に立つ
初の外国人弁護士になりました
02:50
in Afghan courts.
アフガニスタンの法廷に立つ
初の外国人弁護士になりました
02:52
Throughout this time, I also studied many laws,
この間ずっと
私は様々な法律を学び
02:54
I talked to many people,
たくさんの人たちと話し
02:57
I read up on many cases,
多くの裁判例を読みました
02:59
and I found that the lack of justness
そして気付いたのは
公正さが欠けているのは
03:00
is not just a problem in Afghanistan,
アフガニスタンだけではなく
03:02
but it's a global problem.
世界中でだということです
03:04
And while I originally shied away from
元々 私は人権侵害事件は
03:07
representing human rights cases
引き受けないようにしてきました
03:08
because I was really concerned about how it would
キャリアや私生活に与える影響が
03:10
affect me both professionally and personally,
とても心配だったからです
03:13
I decided that the need for justness was so great
でも 公正さがこれほど
必要とされているのに
03:15
that I couldn't continue to ignore it.
黙って見てはいられないと決心し
03:18
And so I started representing people like Naghma
私はナグマのような人たちも
03:20
pro bono also.
無償で代理を引き受けるようになりました
03:22
Now, since I've been in Afghanistan
アフガニスタンでの滞在
03:25
and since I've been an attorney for over 10 years,
そして 10年以上の弁護士キャリアを通じ
03:26
I've represented from CEOs
of Fortune 500 companies
私が代理したのは
フォーチュン500社のCEOから大使
03:29
to ambassadors to little girls like Naghma,
そしてナグマのような少女まで様々で
03:33
and with much success.
大いに成功を収めました
03:35
And the reason for my success is very simple:
この成功の理由は
至ってシンプルです
03:36
I work the system from the inside out
制度を徹底的に使い
03:39
and use the laws in the ways
法律が意図した形で
03:41
that they're intended to be used.
法律を使うのです
03:43
I find that
思うに―
03:45
achieving justness in places like Afghanistan
アフガニスタンのような場所で
公正さを実現するのは難しく
03:48
is difficult, and there's three reasons.
それには3つの理由が挙げられます
03:51
The first reason is that simply put,
1つ目の理由は 簡単に言えば
03:53
people are very uneducated as
to what their legal rights were,
人々が 自らの法的権利について
あまり知らないということで
03:56
and I find that this is a global problem.
これはグローバルな問題だと思います
03:59
The second issue
2つ目は
04:01
is that even with laws on the books,
きちんと法律があったとしても
04:03
it's often superseded or ignored
しばしば部族慣習が優先され
法律が無視されます
04:06
by tribal customs, like in the first jirga
ちょうど最初のジグラが
ナグマを売ると決めたようにです
04:08
that sold Naghma off.
ちょうど最初のジグラが
ナグマを売ると決めたようにです
04:11
And the third problem with achieving justness
公正さを阻む3つ目の問題は
04:12
is that even with good, existing laws on the books,
たとえ素晴らしい法律があっても
04:15
there aren't people or lawyers
that are willing to fight
こうした法律にもとづいて戦おうとする
04:18
for those laws.
人も弁護士もいないことです
04:20
And that's what I do: I use existing laws,
それこそ私がしていることで
既存の法律―
04:22
often unused laws,
多くは使われていない法律を使い
04:25
and I work those to the benefits of my clients.
クライアントの利益のために
法律を活用するのです
04:27
We all need to create a global culture
私たちは 人権という
グローバルな文化を創り
04:30
of human rights
私たちは 人権という
グローバルな文化を創り
04:33
and be investors in a global
human rights economy,
グローバルな人権経済に投資する
必要があります
04:35
and by working in this mindset,
こうした意識を持つことで
04:37
we can significantly improve justice globally.
グローバルな規模で
公正さを大きく向上させられます
04:39
Now let's get back to Naghma.
さて ナグマの話に戻りましょう
04:42
Several people heard about this story,
何人かがこの話を聞きつけて
04:44
and so they contacted me because they wanted
私に連絡を取ってきました
04:47
to pay the $2,500 debt.
借金25万円を肩代わりすると言うのです
04:48
And it's not just that simple;
でも そんな簡単には行きません
04:51
you can't just throw money at this problem
お金を払えばすべて解決する
04:53
and think that it's going to disappear.
というわけではないのです
04:54
That's not how it works in Afghanistan.
アフガニスタンでは違います
04:56
So I told them I'd get involved,
ですから 私が対応すると言いました
04:58
but in order to get involved,
what needed to happen
でも 私が参加するためには
05:02
is a second jirga needed to be called,
2回目のジグラが
開かれる必要があります
05:04
a jirga of appeals.
つまり ジグラの
控訴審を開くのです
05:07
And so in order for that to happen,
そのためには
05:09
we needed to get the village elders together,
村の長老の協力を取り付け
05:11
we needed to get the tribal leaders together,
部族のリーダー
つまり 宗教的指導者の
05:14
the religious leaders.
協力を取り付けないといけません
05:16
Naghma's father needed to agree,
ナグマの父親の承諾と
05:18
the neighbor needed to agree,
あの隣人の承諾も必要ですし
05:19
and also his son needed to agree.
その息子の同意も必要でした
05:20
And I thought, if I'm going to
get involved in this thing,
もし私が本件に関わるのであれば
05:23
then they also need to agree
that I preside over it.
私が取り仕切ることについて
同意を得ておくべきだと思いました
05:27
So, after hours of talking
ですから 何時間も話し合いをし
05:30
and tracking them down,
説き伏せて行き
05:33
and about 30 cups of tea,
お茶を30杯ほど飲んだころ
05:34
they finally agreed that we could sit down
ようやく同意が得られて
私たちは
05:37
for a second jirga, and we did.
2回目のジグラを開くことができました
05:39
And what was different about the second jirga
このジグラが
1回目と違っていたのは
05:43
is this time, we put the law at the center of it,
法律をその中心に据えたことです
05:45
and it was very important for me
私が重要だと思っていたのは
05:47
that they all understood that Naghma
皆が ナグマには
05:49
had a right to be protected.
守られるべき権利があることを
理解することです
05:50
And at the end of this jirga,
このジグラの最後に
05:53
it was ordered by the judge
判事役によって決定が下されました
05:54
that the first decision was erased,
「最初の決定は取消し
05:56
and that the $2,500 debt was satisfied,
25万円の借金は支払われたものとする」
06:00
and we all signed a written order
私たちは 決定書に署名をしました
06:04
where all the men acknowledged
すべての関係者は
06:06
that what they did was illegal,
自らしたことは違法だったと認め
06:07
and if they did it again, that
they would go to prison.
再び同じことをした場合には
刑務所に行くと約束しました
06:09
Most —
最も―
06:14
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:16
Thanks.
ありがとう
06:17
And most importantly,
そして 最も重要なこととして
06:19
the engagement was terminated
この婚約は破棄され
06:21
and Naghma was free.
ナグマは自由の身となりました
06:22
Protecting Naghma and her right to be free
ナグマと 彼女の自由権を守ることで
06:24
protects us.
私たちも救われました
06:27
Now, with my job, there's above-average
さて 私の仕事には
06:30
amount of risks that are involved.
平均以上のリスクが伴います
06:33
I've been temporarily detained.
私は一時拘束をされたことも
06:36
I've been accused of running a brothel,
売春宿を経営していると非難され
06:39
accused of being a spy.
スパイ容疑をかけられたこともあります
06:41
I've had a grenade thrown at my office.
事務所に手りゅう弾も投げられました
06:44
It didn't go off, though.
爆発はしなかったのですが―
06:46
But I find that with my job,
それでも この仕事では
06:48
that the rewards far outweigh the risks,
リスクより 何が得られるかが
はるかに重要です
06:50
and as many risks as I take,
私がリスクを取っただけ
06:53
my clients take far greater risks,
クライアントは
より大きなリスクを抱えます
06:55
because they have a lot more to lose
彼らが失うものは大きいのです
06:57
if their cases go unheard,
裁判が開かれないばかりか
06:59
or worse, if they're penalized
for having me as their lawyer.
最悪の場合には
私を弁護士に雇ったことで処罰されます
07:00
With every case that I take,
私が受任した どの事件においても
07:03
I realize that as much as
I'm standing behind my clients,
私がクライアントを支えるのと同様
07:05
that they're also standing behind me,
私はクライアントに支えられ
07:08
and that's what keeps me going.
それが私の原動力となっています
07:10
Law as a point of leverage
法律は その影響力においても
07:14
is crucial in protecting all of us.
私たち 皆を守るのに非常に重要です
07:16
Journalists are very vital in making sure
ジャーナリストも必要不可欠です
07:18
that that information is given to the public.
情報を一般大衆に伝える役割があるからです
07:21
Too often, we receive information from journalists
これだけ頻繁に ジャーナリストから
情報を受け取りながら
07:24
but we forget how that information was given.
その情報がどのように来たか
私たちは忘れています
07:27
This picture is a picture of the
こちらの写真は
07:30
British press corps in Afghanistan.
在アフガニスタンのイギリス記者団です
07:33
It was taken a couple of years
ago by my friend David Gill.
友人のデイビッド・ギルが
2年前に撮影したものです
07:35
According to the Committee to Protect Journalists,
ジャーナリスト保護委員会によれば
07:38
since 2010, there have been
thousands of journalists
2010年以降 何千ものジャーナリストが
07:40
who have been threatened, injured,
脅迫や殺傷事件
07:43
killed, detained.
拘留の憂き目に遭っています
07:45
Too often, when we get this information,
私たちは こうした情報を耳にしながら
07:47
we forget who it affects
それが誰に影響を与え
07:50
or how that information is given to us.
その情報がどうもたらされるのか
ほとんど気にしていません
07:51
What many journalists do,
both foreign and domestic,
国内外のジャーナリストたちの活動は
07:54
is very remarkable, especially
in places like Afghanistan,
本当に素晴らしく
特にアフガニスタンのような場所ではそうです
07:57
and it's important that we never forget that,
そのことを忘れてはなりません
08:01
because what they're protecting
彼らが守っているのは
08:02
is not only our right to receive that information
私たちの情報を受ける権利だけでなく
08:04
but also the freedom of the press, which is vital
報道の自由でもあるからです
それなしには
08:06
to a democratic society.
民主社会はありえません
08:08
Matt Rosenberg is a journalist in Afghanistan.
アフガニスタンで活動する
マット・ローゼンバーグは
08:11
He works for The New York Times,
ニューヨークタイムズ紙の記者です
08:15
and unfortunately, a few months ago
不幸なことに 数ヶ月前
08:17
he wrote an article that displeased
彼の記事が政府関係者の
08:18
people in the government.
逆鱗に触れました
08:20
As a result, he was temporarily detained
その結果 彼は一時拘留を受け
08:22
and he was illegally exiled out of the country.
違法に国外追放されました
08:25
I represent Matt,
私はマットを代理して
08:29
and after dealing with the government,
政府と交渉をし
08:31
I was able to get legal acknowledgment
次のことを認めさせました
08:34
that in fact he was illegally exiled,
彼の国外追放処分は違法であり
08:35
and that freedom of the
press does exist in Afghanistan,
アフガニスタンでは
報道の自由が保証されており
08:38
and there's consequences if that's not followed.
それが脅かされれば
相応の責任が問われることです
08:41
And I'm happy to say that
幸いにも
08:44
as of a few days ago,
数日前に
08:46
the Afghan government
アフガニスタン政府は
08:48
formally invited him back into the country
正式にマットを招へいし
08:49
and they reversed their exile order of him.
国外追放処分を無効にしました
08:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:55
If you censor one journalist,
then it intimidates others,
たとえ1人でも記者が検閲を受ければ
まわりにも波及し
09:00
and soon nations are silenced.
すぐに国全体が
口を閉ざすことになります
09:03
It's important that we protect our journalists
ジャーナリストと報道の自由を守ることは
09:05
and freedom of the press,
重要なのです
09:07
because that makes governments
more accountable to us
そうすることで 政府に
説明責任を負わせ
09:09
and more transparent.
透明性もより高まるからです
09:11
Protecting journalists and our right
ジャーナリストと 私たちの―
09:13
to receive information protects us.
情報を受ける権利を守ることで
私たちが守られるのです
09:15
Our world is changing. We live
in a different world now,
世界は日々変化しており
今は 新しい世界に生きています
09:19
and what were once individual problems
かつては個人の問題だったものが
09:22
are really now global problems for all of us.
今や 私たち皆に関わる
グローバルな問題となっています
09:25
Two weeks ago, Afghanistan had its first
2週間前 アフガニスタンで
09:28
democratic transfer of power
初めて民主化がされ
09:31
and elected president Ashraf Ghani, which is huge,
アシュラフ・ガニー大統領が選出されました
これは すごいことで
09:33
and I'm very optimistic about him,
私は楽観的に考えており
09:36
and I'm hopeful that he'll give Afghanistan
大統領は アフガニスタンが必要とする変革
09:39
the changes that it needs,
特に法律分野における変革を
09:41
especially within the legal sector.
成し遂げてくれると 願っています
09:42
We live in a different world.
私たちは別世界に住んでいます
09:45
We live in a world where my
eight-year-old daughter
8歳の娘は 黒人の大統領しか知らない―
09:47
only knows a black president.
そんな世界に住んでいます
09:49
There's a great possibility that our next president
次の大統領が女性の可能性も
09:52
will be a woman,
とても高いですから
09:54
and as she gets older, she may question,
娘が大きくなる頃
こんな疑問を持つかもしれません
09:56
can a white guy be president?
「白人男性も大統領になれるの?」
09:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:00
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:02
Our world is changing, and
we need to change with it,
刻々と変わる世界にあわせて
私たちも変わる必要があります
10:05
and what were once individual problems
かつては個人の問題だったものが
10:08
are problems for all of us.
今や 私たち全てに関わる問題なのです
10:10
According to UNICEF,
ユニセフによれば
10:13
there are currently over 280 million
現在 2億8千万人以上もの
10:15
boys and girls who are married
少年少女が15歳未満で
10:21
under the age of 15.
結婚させられています
10:23
Two hundred and eighty million.
2億8千万人です
10:25
Child marriages prolong the vicious cycle
こうした児童婚は 悪循環を助長します
10:27
of poverty, poor health, lack of education.
貧困で健康が損なわれ
教育も受けられないのです
10:29
At the age of 12, Sahar was married.
12歳のとき サハルは結婚しました
10:34
She was forced into this marriage
結婚を強要され
10:38
and sold by her brother.
実の兄に売られたのです
10:40
When she went to her in-laws' house,
義理の実家に行くと
10:42
they forced her into prostitution.
売春を強いられ
10:44
Because she refused, she was tortured.
それを拒むと虐待を受けました
10:47
She was severely beaten with metal rods.
金属棒で ひどく打たれ
10:50
They burned her body.
やけども負わされました
10:55
They tied her up in a basement and starved her.
サハルは地下に縛りつけられ
食事も与えられませんでした
10:57
They used pliers to take out her fingernails.
ペンチで爪を剥がされもしました
11:01
At one point,
あるとき
11:05
she managed to escape from this torture chamber
彼女はやっとの思いで
この拷問部屋から抜け出し
11:07
to a neighbor's house,
隣家に逃げ込みます
11:10
and when she went there, instead of protecting her,
しかし サハルはそこで保護されるどころか
11:12
they dragged her back
夫の家へと
11:16
to her husband's house,
連れ戻されたのでした
11:18
and she was tortured even worse.
虐待は一層ひどくなりました
11:19
When I met first Sahar, thankfully,
私が初めてサハルに会ったとき
幸いにも 彼女は
11:25
Women for Afghan Women
女性支援団体「Women for Afghan Women」の
保護施設にいました
11:28
gave her a safe haven to go to.
女性支援団体「Women for Afghan Women」の
保護施設にいました
11:30
As a lawyer, I try to be very strong
弁護士として 私はクライアントの前では
11:33
for all my clients,
常に気丈に振る舞うようにしています
11:36
because that's very important to me,
私にとって重要なことだからです
11:38
but seeing her,
でも サハルを見たとき
11:42
how broken and very weak as she was,
ボロボロで弱々しい様子を目の当たりにし
11:45
was very difficult.
強くなどいられませんでした
11:49
It took weeks for us to really get to
何週間もの間 私たちは
11:52
what happened to her
彼女があの家にいたときに
11:55
when she was in that house,
何があったのか わかりませんでした
11:59
but finally she started opening up to me,
ついに 彼女が私に心を開き始め
12:01
and when she opened up,
すべてを話してくれました
12:03
what I heard was
彼女はこう言いました
12:06
she didn't know what her rights were,
「自分にどんな権利があるのか知らない
12:07
but she did know she had
a certain level of protection
でも 保護を与えてくれるはずの政府に
12:10
by her government that failed her,
私は裏切られた」と
12:12
and so we were able to talk about
そこで私たちは 彼女が
12:14
what her legal options were.
どんな法的救済を求め得るのか
話し合いました
12:16
And so we decided to take this case
私たちはこの事件を
12:19
to the Supreme Court.
最高裁で争うことにしました
12:21
Now, this is extremely significant,
これは非常に重要なことです
12:22
because this is the first time
というのも アフガニスタンで初めて
12:24
that a victim of domestic violence in Afghanistan
ドメスティック・バイオレンスの被害者が
12:26
was being represented by a lawyer,
弁護士に代理されたからです
12:29
a law that's been on the
books for years and years,
法律は 何年もそこに
あったにもかかわらず
12:32
but until Sahar, had never been used.
このときまで一度も
使われることはなかったのです
12:35
In addition to this, we also decided
これに加えて私たちは
12:38
to sue for civil damages,
損害賠償も請求することにしました
12:40
again using a law that's never been used,
使われたことのない法律を
12:42
but we used it for her case.
初めて使ったのです
12:45
So there we were at the Supreme Court
私たちは最高裁に行きました
12:48
arguing in front of 12 Afghan justices,
アフガニスタン人判事12名の前で
12:50
me as an American female lawyer,
アメリカ人の女性弁護士と
12:53
and Sahar, a young woman
若い女性のサハルが
主張を繰り広げたのです
12:56
who when I met her couldn't
speak above a whisper.
初めて会ったときには声も出なかった
12:59
She stood up,
サハルが 立ち上がり
13:05
she found her voice,
自らの意見を言うのです
13:06
and my girl told them that she wanted justice,
彼女は正義がほしいと訴え
13:09
and she got it.
正義を勝ち取りました
13:11
At the end of it all, the court unanimously agreed
審理を終えたあと
裁判官は全員一致で
13:14
that her in-laws should be
arrested for what they did to her,
サハルの義理の家族は
虐待で逮捕され
13:17
her fucking brother should also be arrested
実の兄も 彼女を売ったことで
13:21
for selling her —
逮捕されるべきだと判示し―
13:24
(Applause) —
(拍手)-
13:26
and they agreed that she did have a right
そして 裁判所は
サハルの損害賠償請求権も認めました
13:30
to civil compensation.
そして 裁判所は
サハルの損害賠償請求権も認めました
13:32
What Sahar has shown us is that we can attack
サハルが教えてくれたのは
13:34
existing bad practices by using the laws
法律を その意図された形で使うことで
13:37
in the ways that they're intended to be used,
今ある悪しき慣習を打ち砕ける
ということです
13:40
and by protecting Sahar,
サハルを守ることを通じて
13:43
we are protecting ourselves.
私たちは自らを守ったのです
13:45
After having worked in Afghanistan
アフガニスタンで働き始めて
13:49
for over six years now,
もう6年以上になります
13:51
a lot of my family and friends think
家族や友人の多くは
13:53
that what I do looks like this.
私の仕事はこんな感じだと思っています
13:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:57
But in all actuality, what I do looks like this.
でも 実際はこうなんです
14:00
Now, we can all do something.
私たち皆にできることがあります
14:05
I'm not saying we should all buy a
plane ticket and go to Afghanistan,
航空券を買って
アフガニスタンに行く必要はありません
14:07
but we can all be contributors
皆で 人権を尊重するグローバル経済を
14:09
to a global human rights economy.
創っていくのです
14:12
We can create a culture of transparency
法律に従って透明性や
14:14
and accountability to the laws,
説明責任を求める文化を醸成し
14:17
and make governments more accountable to us,
政府にも 私たちへの説明責任を
もっと求めます
14:18
as we are to them.
私たちも責任を負うべきです
14:20
A few months ago, a South African lawyer
数ヶ月前 ある南アフリカの弁護士が
14:23
visited me in my office
私の事務所を訪れて言いました
14:25
and he said, "I wanted to meet you.
「あなたに会いたかったです
14:27
I wanted to see what a crazy person looked like."
どんなクレージーな人か
見てみたいと思っていたんです」
14:29
The laws are ours,
法律は 私たちのものです
14:33
and no matter what your ethnicity,
民族や国籍
14:35
nationality, gender, race,
性別 人種にかかわらず
14:37
they belong to us,
私たちのものなのです
14:40
and fighting for justice is not an act of insanity.
正義のために戦うことは
狂気の沙汰でも何でもありません
14:42
Businesses also need to get with the program.
企業も この取組みに
本腰を入れるべきです
14:47
A corporate investment in human rights
企業が人権に投資をすれば
14:49
is a capital gain on your businesses,
事業上の資本利得となります
14:51
and whether you're a business, an NGO,
ビジネスやNGO 個人であろうと
14:53
or a private citizen, rule
of law benefits all of us.
法の支配は
私たち皆のためになります
14:55
And by working together with a concerted mindset,
同じ考えのもと協働することで
14:59
through the people, public and private sector,
人々や 民間・公共部門の垣根を越えて
15:01
we can create a global human rights economy
人権を尊重するグローバル経済を創造し
15:05
and all become global investors in human rights.
皆で 人権保護を支持する
グローバル投資家になるのです
15:07
And by doing this,
そうすることで
15:11
we can achieve justness together.
私たちは「公正さ」を共に手にできます
15:12
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
15:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:17
Translator:Yuko Yoshida
Reviewer:Masako Kigami

sponsored links

Kimberley Motley - International litigator
American lawyer Kimberley Motley is the only Western litigator in Afghanistan's courts; as her practice expands to other countries, she thinks deeply about how to build the capacity of rule of law globally.

Why you should listen

Kimberley Motley possesses a rare kind of grit—the kind necessary to hang a shingle in Kabul, represent the under-represented, weather a kaleidoscope of threats, and win the respect of the Afghan legal establishment (and of tribal leaders). At present she practices in the U.S., Afghanistan, Dubai, and the International Criminal Courts; as her practice expands to other countries, she thinks deeply about how to engage the legal community to build the capacity of rule of law globally.

After spending five years as a public defender in her native Milwaukee, Motley headed to Afghanistan to join a legal education program run by the U.S. State Department. She noticed Westerners stranded in Afghan prisons without representation, and started defending them. Today, she’s the only Western litigator in Kabul, and one of the most effective defense attorneys in Afghanistan. Her practice, which reports a 90 percent success rate, often represents non-Afghan defendants as well as pro-bono human rights cases.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.