19:29
TED2011

Morgan Spurlock: The greatest TED Talk ever sold

摩根‧斯珀洛克(Morgan Spurlock):史上最成功的TED講座販售

Filmed:

憑藉著幽默和毅力,導演摩根‧斯普爾洛克(Morgan Spurlock)潛入潛在且有影響力的品牌行銷的世界裡,他企圖拍攝一部由贊助商完全贊助的電影。(同時,這場演講的命名權也是來自廠商贊助。由誰贊助和贊助了多少錢?他會告訴你。)

- Filmmaker
Morgan Spurlock makes documentary film and TV that is personal, political -- and, above all, deeply empathetic. Full bio

I have spent the past few years
我在過去的幾年裡
00:15
putting myself into situations
讓自己處在
00:18
that are usually very difficult
非常困難的的情況裡
00:20
and at the same time somewhat dangerous.
同時也有點危險。
00:22
I went to prison --
我被關在監獄 -
00:26
difficult.
困難。
00:28
I worked in a coal mine --
我在煤礦場工作 -
00:30
dangerous.
危險。
00:33
I filmed in war zones --
我在戰區拍片 -
00:35
difficult and dangerous.
困難又危險。
00:37
And I spent 30 days eating nothing but this --
我花了30天不吃其他東西,只吃這個 -
00:39
fun in the beginning,
在開始時很好玩,
00:43
little difficult in the middle, very dangerous in the end.
過程中有點困難,在結束時非常危險。
00:45
In fact, most of my career,
事實上,大部分我職業生涯裏,
00:49
I've been immersing myself
我一直讓自己
00:51
into seemingly horrible situations
沉浸在看似可怕的情況裡
00:53
for the whole goal of trying
為的是
00:56
to examine societal issues
研究社會問題
00:58
in a way that make them engaging, that make them interesting,
我用讓大家一同參與,使大家感興趣的方式,
01:00
that hopefully break them down in a way
希望讓這些研究
01:03
that make them entertaining and accessible to an audience.
變得有娛樂性和能讓觀眾觸及。
01:05
So when I knew I was coming here
所以,當我知道我要來這裡
01:08
to do a TED Talk that was going to look at the world of branding and sponsorship,
做一場TED演講,探討世界上的品牌和贊助,
01:10
I knew I would want to do something a little different.
我知道我想要做一些不一樣的東西。
01:13
So as some of you may or may not have heard,
你們有些人可能有也可能沒有聽過,
01:15
a couple weeks ago, I took out an ad on eBay.
幾個星期前,我在Ebay貼出一則廣告。
01:18
I sent out some Facebook messages,
我在Facebook發出了一些消息,
01:21
some Twitter messages,
也在Twitter發出一些消息,
01:24
and I gave people the opportunity to buy the naming rights
我讓大家有機會可以購買
01:26
to my 2011 TED Talk.
我2011年TED演講名稱的命名權。
01:28
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
01:30
That's right, some lucky individual, corporation,
沒錯,一些幸運的人,公司行號,
01:32
for-profit or non-profit,
營利或非營利的機構,
01:35
was going to get the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity --
會得到一次千載難逢的機會 -
01:37
because I'm sure Chris Anderson will never let it happen again --
因為我敢說,克里斯安德森(TED總監)將永遠不會讓這事再發生 -
01:39
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
01:41
to buy the naming rights
大家可以來購買
01:43
to the talk you're watching right now,
你現在正在看的演講的命名權,
01:45
that at the time didn't have a title, didn't really have a lot of content
在拍賣當時,沒有主題,也沒有內容說明
01:47
and didn't really give much hint
更沒有提供任何
01:50
as to what the subject matter would actually be.
關於實際上題材的線索。
01:52
So what you were getting was this:
所以,買家得到的是:
01:55
Your name here presents:
你的名字會刊登在這裡:
01:57
My TED Talk that you have no idea what the subject is
你不知道我的TED演講的主題是什麼
01:59
and, depending on the content, could ultimately blow up in your face,
且根據不同的內容,可能最後事情會完全搞砸,
02:02
especially if I make you or your company look stupid for doing it.
尤其如果我做些讓你或你的公司看起來愚蠢的事。
02:05
But that being said,
儘管如此,
02:08
it's a very good media opportunity.
這是一個非常好的宣傳機會。
02:10
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
02:12
You know how many people watch these TED Talks?
你知道有多少人會觀看這些 TEDTalks?
02:18
It's a lot.
很多人呢。
02:21
That's just a working title, by the way.
順便提一下,這名稱只是暫定的。
02:24
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
02:26
So even with that caveat,
因此,即使有警告過了,
02:28
I knew that someone would buy the naming rights.
我知道還是有人會買命名權。
02:31
Now if you'd have asked me that a year ago,
如果你一年前問我
02:33
I wouldn't have been able to tell you that with any certainty.
我不會有把握能夠告訴你。
02:35
But in the new project that I'm working on, my new film,
但我現在正在努力的新計劃,就是我的新電影,
02:37
we examine the world of marketing, advertising.
我們將探討行銷,也就是廣告。
02:39
And as I said earlier,
正如我剛才所說,
02:42
I put myself in some pretty horrible situations over the years,
多年來,我讓自己處在一些非常可怕的情況,
02:44
but nothing could prepare me, nothing could ready me,
但我再怎麽準備,再怎麽作心理建設,
02:47
for anything as difficult
也沒辦法來應付
02:50
or as dangerous
以下這個危險的狀況
02:53
as going into the rooms with these guys.
那就是:和這些傢伙(廣告公司)同在一間房裏。
02:55
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
02:59
You see, I had this idea for a movie.
你看,我有拍這種電影的想法。
03:02
(Video) Morgan Spurlock: What I want to do is make a film
(影片)摩根‧斯珀洛克:我想做的就是拍部電影
03:05
all about product placement, marketing and advertising,
是關於置入性行銷,產品行銷和廣告,
03:07
where the entire film is funded
然後整齣電影的經費
03:10
by product placement, marketing and advertising.
就來自產品的置入性行銷,行銷和廣告。
03:12
So the movie will be called "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold."
所以,這部電影,會被稱為“最成功的電影販售”。
03:14
So what happens in "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold,"
那麼,在“最成功的電影販售”講的是
03:17
is that everything from top to bottom, from start to finish,
一切從上到下,從開始到結束,
03:19
is branded from beginning to end --
完全的品牌化 -
03:22
from the above-the-title sponsor that you'll see in the movie,
你會看到在電影中,看到冠名贊助商,
03:24
which is brand X.
這是某某品牌。
03:26
Now this brand, the Qualcomm Stadium,
現在這個品牌,高通球場(Qualcomm Stadium),
03:28
the Staples Center ...
斯台普斯中心(Staples Center)...
03:30
these people will be married to the film in perpetuity -- forever.
這些人將永久和電影連結在一起 - 直到永遠。
03:32
And so the film explores this whole idea -- (Michael Kassan: It's redundant.)
整齣電影將探討這個想法 - (Michael Kassan:這是多餘的。)
03:35
It's what? (MK: It's redundant.) In perpetuity, forever?
你說什麼? (MK:我說這是多餘的。)你是說永久永遠嗎?
03:37
I'm a redundant person. (MK: I'm just saying.)
我是個多餘的人。 (MK:我只是這樣說。)
03:40
That was more for emphasis.
這只是爲了強調
03:42
It was, "In perpetuity. Forever."
說,“永久——直到永遠”。
03:44
But not only are we going to have the brand X title sponsor,
不過,我們不僅擁有某某品牌冠名贊助商,
03:46
but we're going to make sure we sell out every category we can in the film.
我們還將確保,我們把電影裡能賣的贊助部分都給賣出。
03:48
So maybe we sell a shoe and it becomes the greatest shoe you ever wore ...
所以,也許贊助鞋的部分,讓它成為有史以來你穿過最好的鞋...
03:50
the greatest car you ever drove from "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold,"
“最成功的電影販售”中,有史以來你開過最好的車,
03:53
the greatest drink you've ever had, courtesy of "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold."
“最成功的電影販售”,由有史以來你喝過最好喝的飲料所贊助,
03:56
Xavier Kochhar: So the idea is,
Xavier Kochhar:這樣的想法是,
03:59
beyond just showing that brands are a part of your life,
不止要展示說品牌是你生活的一部分,
04:01
but actually get them to finance the film? (MS: Get them to finance the film.)
而且還要由他們來資助電影嗎? (MS:讓他們出資來拍電影。)
04:03
MS: And actually we show the whole process of how does it work.
MS:實際上,我們會完整呈現這部分的工作。
04:06
The goal of this whole film is transparency.
我們的目標是要讓整齣電影的贊助透明化。
04:08
You're going to see the whole thing take place in this movie.
你在這部電影裡可以看到所有的過程。
04:10
So that's the whole concept,
這是整體概念,
04:12
the whole film, start to finish.
整部影片,從開始到結束都是被贊助的。
04:14
And I would love for CEG to help make it happen.
我非常希望有CEG的贊助,使拍片能成功。
04:16
Robert Friedman: You know it's funny,
Robert Friedman:説來有趣,
04:18
because when I first hear it,
因為當我第一次聽到這個主意時,
04:20
it is the ultimate respect
我覺得這是
04:22
for an audience.
對觀眾最極致的尊重
04:24
Guy: I don't know how receptive
Guy:我不知道
04:26
people are going to be to it, though.
人們對這一切的接受度有多高。
04:28
XK: Do you have a perspective --
XK:你有想過嗎 -
04:30
I don't want to use "angle" because that has a negative connotation --
我不想用“角度”這個字,因為有負面的涵義 -
04:32
but do you know how this is going to play out? (MS: No idea.)
不過你知道電影要怎麼呈現嗎? (MS:我不知道。)
04:34
David Cohn: How much money does it take to do this?
David Cohn:這樣做要花多少錢呢?
04:37
MS: 1.5 million. (DC: Okay.)
MS:150萬美元。 (DC:好吧。)
04:40
John Kamen: I think that you're going to have a hard time meeting with them,
John Kamen:我覺得你跟贊助商見面時,下場可能會蠻淒慘的,
04:43
but I think it's certainly worth pursuing
但我覺得這還是值得試試看
04:45
a couple big, really obvious brands.
找些知名的大品牌。
04:47
XK: Who knows, maybe by the time your film comes out,
XK:誰知道,也許你電影拍出來的時候,
04:50
we look like a bunch of blithering idiots.
我們看起來會像一群在胡扯的笨蛋。
04:52
MS: What do you think the response is going to be?
MS:你認為這樣會得到什麼反應?
04:54
Stuart Ruderfer: The responses mostly will be "no."
Stuart Ruderfer:大多數的反應應該會是“不要”。
04:57
MS: But is it a tough sell because of the film
MS:這是因為是電影本身所以找不到贊助嗎?
04:59
or a tough sell because of me?
還是因為我的關係?
05:01
JK: Both.
JK:兩個都是。
05:03
MS: ... Meaning not so optimistic.
MS:...意思是不太樂觀。
05:05
So, sir, can you help me? I need help.
所以,你能幫我嗎?我需要幫助。
05:08
MK: I can help you.
MK:我可以幫忙。
05:10
MS: Okay. (MK: Good.)
MS:好的。 (MK:好。)
05:12
Awesome.
真棒。
05:14
MK: We've gotta figure out which brands.
MK:我們得弄清楚要哪些品牌。
05:16
MS: Yeah. (MK: That's the challenge.)
MS:是的。 (MK:這是個挑戰。)
05:18
When you look at the people you deal with ..
當你看到和你交涉的人時 ..
05:21
MK: We've got some places we can go. (MS: Okay.)
MK:我們有一些門路。 (MS:好吧。)
05:23
Turn the camera off.
把相機關掉。
05:25
MS: I thought "Turn the camera off"
MS:我想他說“把相機關掉”
05:27
meant, "Let's have an off-the-record conversation."
意味著我們不要有任何談話的記錄。
05:29
Turns out it really means,
結果的真正意思是
05:31
"We want nothing to do with your movie."
“我們不希望與你拍的電影有任何關連。”
05:33
MS: And just like that, one by one,
MS:就這樣,一個接一個,
05:36
all of these companies suddenly disappeared.
所有這裡的公司突然都消失了。
05:39
None of them wanted anything to do with this movie.
沒有公司想要在這部電影裡贊助商品
05:42
I was amazed.
我很驚訝
05:44
They wanted absolutely nothing to do with this project.
他們完全不想參與這個計畫
05:46
And I was blown away, because I thought the whole concept, the idea of advertising,
我被打敗了,因為我覺得整個廣告的概念,
05:48
was to get your product out in front of as many people as possible,
是讓你的產品能盡可能出現在越多的人面前,
05:50
to get as many people to see it as possible.
盡可能讓更多的人看到
05:53
Especially in today's world,
特別是在當今世界,
05:55
this intersection of new media and old media
在新媒體和傳統媒體的交會下
05:57
and the fractured media landscape,
還有不同的媒體區塊
05:59
isn't the idea to get
我們不正是需要
06:01
that new buzz-worthy delivery vehicle
用新穎時髦的傳播工具
06:03
that's going to get that message to the masses?
才能將訊息轉達給群眾嗎?
06:06
No, that's what I thought.
不,那是我的想法。
06:08
But the problem was, you see,
但問題是,你看,
06:11
my idea had one fatal flaw,
我的想法有一個致命的缺陷,
06:13
and that flaw was this.
那個缺陷是這個。
06:16
Actually no, that was not the flaw whatsoever.
其實不是,這不是任何缺陷。
06:20
That wouldn't have been a problem at all.
這本來是不會有問題的。
06:22
This would have been fine.
原本應該會很好的
06:24
But what this image represents was the problem.
但是這個圖正顯示出問題在哪裏
06:26
See, when you do a Google image search for transparency,
你瞧,當你在Google圖片上搜尋“透明度”,
06:28
this is ---
這是 --
06:30
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
06:32
(Applause)
(掌聲)
06:34
This is one of the first images that comes up.
這是第一張會出現的圖。
06:37
So I like the way you roll, Sergey Brin. No.
Sergey Brin(Google創辦人之一)我真愛你管理的方式。不
06:40
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
06:43
This is was the problem: transparency --
這就是問題所在:透明度 -
06:47
free from pretense or deceit;
不是虛偽或欺騙;
06:50
easily detected or seen through;
很容易發現或識破;
06:52
readily understood;
很容易理解;
06:54
characterized by visibility or accessibility of information,
特點是訊息的可見性和可得性,
06:56
especially concerning business practices --
特別是關於商業行為 -
06:59
that last line being probably the biggest problem.
最後一句可能是最大的問題。
07:01
You see, we hear a lot about transparency these days.
想想,這些日子以來,我們聽到了很多關於透明度。
07:04
Our politicians say it, our president says it,
我們的政治人物,我們的總統都在說,
07:07
even our CEO's say it.
甚至我們的CEO也在說。
07:09
But suddenly when it comes down to becoming a reality,
但是,當它突然變成現實的一部分,
07:11
something suddenly changes.
事情就不一樣了。
07:13
But why? Well, transparency is scary --
但是為什麼呢?嗯,透明度是可怕的 -
07:15
(Roar)
(吼)
07:18
like that odd, still-screaming bear.
像隻又怪又會叫的熊。
07:20
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
07:23
It's unpredictable --
透明度無法捉摸 -
07:25
(Music)
(音樂)
07:27
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
07:29
like this odd country road.
像一條奇怪的鄉間小路。
07:31
And it's also very risky.
而且是很危險的。
07:34
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
07:38
What else is risky?
還有什麼也是危險的?
07:41
Eating an entire bowl of Cool Whip.
吃一整碗Cool Whip(一種冰奶油甜食)。
07:43
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
07:46
That's very risky.
這是非常危險的。
07:51
Now when I started talking to companies
當我開始和那些公司交涉
07:55
and telling them that we wanted to tell this story,
並告訴他們,我們想製作這樣的故事,
07:57
and they said, "No, we want you to tell a story.
他們說:“不,我們要你製作出一個故事。
07:59
We want you to tell a story,
我們希望你製作故事,
08:01
but we just want to tell our story."
我們希望你製作我們品牌的故事。“
08:03
See, when I was a kid
你看,當我還是個孩子
08:06
and my father would catch me in some sort of a lie --
我父親會跟我說某些謊話 -
08:08
and there he is giving me the look he often gave me --
而且他臉部的表情會像平常那樣 -
08:10
he would say, "Son, there's three sides to every story.
他會說:“兒子,每一個故事都有三種面向。
08:13
There's your story,
有你的,
08:17
there's my story
有我的,
08:20
and there's the real story."
還有真實的部分。“
08:22
Now you see, with this film, we wanted to tell the real story.
現在,這部電影,我們想說真實的故事。
08:24
But with only one company, one agency willing to help me --
但是,只有一個公司,一個機構願意幫助我 -
08:27
and that's only because I knew John Bond and Richard Kirshenbaum for years --
而且還是因為我認識John Bond和Richard Kirshenbaum很多年 -
08:29
I realized that I would have to go on my own,
我意識到,我必須自己來,
08:33
I'd have to cut out the middleman
我不能再委託別人
08:35
and go to the companies myself with all of my team.
我得自己和我的團隊直接到贊助商那裡去。
08:37
So what you suddenly started to realize --
然後,你突然開始意識到 -
08:40
or what I started to realize --
或者是我開始意識到 -
08:42
is that when you started having conversations with these companies,
當你開始和這些公司交涉,
08:44
the idea of understanding your brand is a universal problem.
了解品牌的概念是大家共同的問題。
08:46
(Video) MS: I have friends who make great big, giant Hollywood films,
(影片)MS:我有位朋友是在製作大成本的好萊塢電影
08:49
and I have friends who make little independent films like I make.
我也有朋友和我一樣是小型的獨立製片。
08:51
And the friends of mine who make big, giant Hollywood movies
我那位製作大成本好萊塢電影的朋友
08:54
say the reason their films are so successful
說他們的電影之所以是如此成功
08:56
is because of the brand partners that they have.
是因為他們有合作的贊助品牌。
08:58
And then my friends who make small independent films
然後我那些小型的獨立製片的朋友
09:00
say, "Well, how are we supposed to compete
說:“那我們要如何
09:02
with these big, giant Hollywood movies?"
去和這些大成本製作的好萊塢電影競爭?“
09:04
And the movie is called
而我們這部電影叫做
09:06
"The Greatest Movie Ever Sold."
“最成功的電影販售”。
09:08
So how specifically will we see Ban in the film?
那要如何讓Ban這個牌子具體的在電影出現呢?
09:10
Any time I'm ready to go, any time I open up my medicine cabinet,
每當我準備好,每當我打開了我的醫藥箱,
09:13
you will see Ban deodorant.
你會看到Ban牌體香劑。
09:16
While anytime I do an interview with someone,
每當我訪問一個人,
09:18
I can say, "Are you fresh enough for this interview?
我可以問,“你覺得現在體味清爽可以接受訪問嗎?
09:21
Are you ready? You look a little nervous.
你準備好了嗎?你看起來有點緊張。
09:24
I want to help you calm down.
我想幫助你平靜下來。
09:26
So maybe you should put some one before the interview."
也許你應該在受訪前試用一下。“
09:28
So we'll offer one of these fabulous scents.
因此,我們將提供其中一款絕妙的香味。
09:30
Whether it's a "Floral Fusion" or a "Paradise Winds,"
無論是“綜合花香”或“天堂之風”
09:32
they'll have their chance.
都可以上鏡頭。
09:34
We will have them geared for both male or female --
我們會讓他們準備好給男性或女性 -
09:36
solid, roll-on or stick, whatever it may be.
不管是膏狀,滾珠的,或條狀的都可以。
09:39
That's the two-cent tour.
這算是種小的宣傳手法。
09:42
So now I can answer any of your questions
所以現在我可以回答您的任何問題
09:44
and give you the five-cent tour.
然後討論更好的宣傳方式。
09:46
Karen Frank: We are a smaller brand.
Karen Frank:我們是一個小品牌。
09:48
Much like you talked about being a smaller movie,
就像你說作為一個小電影,
09:50
we're very much a challenger brand.
我們是來挑戰大厰的品牌。
09:52
So we don't have the budgets that other brands have.
我們不像其他品牌有龐大的預算。
09:54
So doing things like this -- you know,
所以做這樣的事情 - 你知道,
09:56
remind people about Ban --
宣傳我們的牌子 -
09:58
is kind of why were interested in it.
這也是爲什麽我們有興趣的原因。
10:00
MS: What are the words that you would use to describe Ban?
MS:那你會用什麼話來描述Ban這個牌子?
10:02
Ban is blank.
Ban是空白的。
10:04
KF: That's a great question.
KF:這是個好問題。
10:07
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
10:10
Woman: Superior technology.
女:高科技。
10:15
MS: Technology's not the way you want to describe something
MS:你不會想用科技來描述
10:17
somebody's putting in their armpit.
大家會放在在他們的腋下的東西。
10:19
Man: We talk about bold, fresh.
男:我們的意思是自信,清爽。
10:21
I think "fresh" is a great word that really spins this category into the positive,
我覺得“清爽”是一個很好的詞,和“對抗汗味和潮濕"比起來
10:23
versus "fights odor and wetness."
讓人有正向的感覺。
10:26
It keeps you fresh.
它讓你保持清爽。
10:28
How do we keep you fresher longer -- better freshness,
我們讓你常保清爽 - 較清爽,
10:30
more freshness, three times fresher.
清爽度更高,高出三倍。
10:32
Things like that that are more of that positive benefit.
這樣的話,應該有更正面的效益。
10:34
MS: And that's a multi-million dollar corporation.
MS:這是一間市值數百萬美元的公司。
10:38
What about me? What about a regular guy?
那我呢?對一位普通人來說?
10:41
I need to go talk to the man on the street,
我需要去和在街上的人交談,
10:43
the people who are like me, the regular Joes.
像我一樣的人,一般人。
10:45
They need to tell me about my brand.
他們需要告訴我他們的品牌形象。
10:47
(Video) MS: How would you guys describe your brand?
(影片)MS:你會如何描述你自己的品牌?
10:49
Man: Um, my brand?
男子:嗯,我的品牌?
10:53
I don't know.
我不知道。
10:56
I like really nice clothes.
我喜歡很漂亮的衣服。
10:58
Woman: 80's revival
女子:80年代的復古
11:00
meets skater-punk,
龐克風,
11:02
unless it's laundry day.
洗衣服那一天除外。
11:04
MS: All right, what is brand Gerry?
MS:好,蓋瑞牌是什麼?
11:06
Gerry: Unique. (MS: Unique.)
蓋瑞:唯一的。 (MS:唯一的。)
11:08
Man: I guess what kind of genre, style I am
男子:我在想我是什麼樣的風格
11:10
would be like dark glamor.
我想應該是黑色誘惑。
11:12
I like a lot of black colors,
我很喜歡黑色,
11:15
a lot of grays and stuff like that.
類似灰色的東西。
11:17
But usually I have an accessory,
通常我會戴配件,
11:19
like sunglasses,
像太陽眼鏡,
11:21
or I like crystal and things like that too.
我喜歡水晶之類的東西。
11:23
Woman: If Dan were a brand,
女:如果丹是一個牌子,
11:25
he might be a classic convertible
他可能是一輛經典的敞篷車
11:27
Mercedes Benz.
奔馳(Mercedes Benz)吧。
11:31
Man 2: The brand that I am
第二位男士:我的品牌
11:33
is, I would call it casual fly.
我可能會叫,休閒風吧。
11:35
Woman 2: Part hippie, part yogi,
第二位女子:有點嬉皮,有點瑜珈,
11:37
part Brooklyn girl -- I don't know.
有點布魯克林的女孩 - 我不知道。
11:39
Man 3: I'm the pet guy.
第三位男子:我是愛寵物的人。
11:41
I sell pet toys all over the country, all over the world.
我在國內國外賣寵物玩具。
11:43
So I guess that's my brand.
我想這是我的品牌。
11:45
In my warped little industry, that's my brand.
我特異的小產業,這是我的品牌。
11:47
Man 4: My brand is FedEx because I deliver the goods.
第四位男子:我的品牌是聯邦快遞,我是快遞人員。
11:50
Man 5: Failed writer-alcoholic brand.
第五位男子:失敗的酒鬼作家。
11:53
Is that something?
這樣可以嗎?
11:55
Lawyer: I'm a lawyer brand.
律師:我的是律師牌。
11:57
Tom: I'm Tom.
湯姆:我叫湯姆。
12:03
MS: Well we can't all be brand Tom, but I do often find myself
MS:嗯,我們不可能都成為湯姆牌,但我經常發現
12:06
at the intersection of dark glamor and casual fly.
自己介於黑色誘惑和休閒風之間。
12:09
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
12:12
And what I realized is I needed an expert.
而我意識到我需要一位專家。
12:14
I needed somebody who could get inside my head,
我需要有個人可以讀出我的想法,
12:16
somebody who could really help me understand
有個人能真正幫我去理解
12:18
what they call your "brand personality."
他們說的“品牌性格”。
12:20
And so I found a company called Olson Zaltman in Pittsburg.
於是,我在匹茲堡找到了一家叫做Olson Zaltman的公司。
12:22
They've helped companies like Nestle, Febreze, Hallmark
他們幫過的公司,有雀巢,Febreze,Hallmark
12:24
discover that brand personality.
他們不僅是發掘出品牌性格。
12:27
If they could do it for them, surely they could do it for me.
如果他們能幫這些公司,他們肯定也能幫我。
12:29
(Video) Abigail: You brought your pictures, right?
(影片)Abigail:你帶了你的照片,對吧?
12:32
MS: I did. The very first picture
MS:是的。第一張照片
12:34
is a picture of my family.
是我的家人。
12:36
A: So tell me a little bit how it relates to your thoughts and feelings about who you are.
A:說說看你的家人對你的想法和情感有什麼影響或關聯。
12:38
MS: These are the people who shape the way I look at the world.
MS:他們教導我如何看待世界。
12:41
A: Tell me about this world.
A:告訴我你對這個世界的看法。
12:43
MS: This world? I think your world is the world that you live in --
MS:這個世界?我覺得世界是你的生活圈 -
12:45
like people who are around you, your friends, your family,
身邊有朋友,家人,
12:48
the way you live your life, the job you do.
你生活的方式,工作的方式。
12:51
All those things stemmed and started from one place,
所有的事情源於同一個地方,
12:53
and for me they stemmed and started with my family in West Virginia.
對我來說都源於我在西維吉尼亞州的家人。
12:55
A: What's the next one you want to talk about?
A:接下來,你還想要說什麼?
12:58
MS: The next one: This was the best day ever.
MS:接下來:這是我最快樂的一天。
13:00
A: How does this relate to your thoughts and feelings about who you are?
A:請問這對你的想法和情感有什麼影響或關聯?
13:02
MS: It's like, who do I want to be?
MS:這像是我想變成誰。
13:04
I like things that are different.
我喜歡的是與眾不同的東西。
13:06
I like things that are weird. I like weird things.
我喜歡的事情是怪異的。我喜歡奇怪的事情。
13:08
A: Tell me about the "why" phase -- what does that do for us?
A:告訴我“為什麼” - 那有甚麼關聯呢?
13:10
What is the machete? What pupa stage are you in now?
什麼是大砍刀?你現在算是人生什麼階段?
13:12
Why is it important to reboot? What does the red represent?
你覺得重新開始重要嗎?紅色對你來說代表什麼?
13:14
Tell me a little bit about that part.
多告訴我相關的部分。
13:17
... A little more about you that is not who you are.
...多一點你不認同的特質。
13:19
What are some other metamorphoses that you've had?
你曾有過的大改變是什麼?
13:22
... Doesn't have to be fear. What kind of roller coaster are you on?
...不要害怕。你坐過什麼樣的登山車呢?
13:24
MS: EEEEEE! (A: Thank you.) No, thank you.
MS:咿咿咿咿咿咿! (A:謝謝你。)不會,謝謝。
13:26
A: Thanks for you patience. (MS: Great job.)
A:感謝你花這麼多時間。 (MS:好極了。)
13:28
A: Yeah. (MS: Thanks a lot.) All right.
A:嗯。 (MS:非常感謝你。)沒什麼。
13:30
MS: Yeah, I don't know what's going to come of this.
MS:好,我不知道現在是怎麼回事。
13:32
There was a whole lot of crazy going on in there.
在裡面有太多瘋狂的事了。
13:34
Lindsay Zaltman: The first thing we saw was this idea
Lindsay Zaltman:首先看到的是這個想法
13:37
that you had two distinct, but complementary
你有兩種不同的品牌性格,
13:39
sides to your brand personality --
但兩者間是互補的 -
13:41
the Morgan Spurlock brand is a mindful/play brand.
Morgan Spurlock牌是一個謹慎/玩樂的品牌
13:44
Those are juxtaposed very nicely together.
這些都非常漂亮排列在一起。
13:47
And I think there's almost a paradox with those.
不過我認為這當中有一個矛盾的地方。
13:49
And I think some companies
而且我覺得有些公司
13:51
will just focus on one of their strengths or the other
將只專注在一個自家的長處或其他的事物
13:53
instead of focusing on both.
而不是兩者都注重。
13:56
Most companies tend to -- and it's human nature --
- 這是人性 - 大多數公司傾向於
13:58
to avoid things that they're not sure of,
迴避那些他們還不確定的事情,
14:01
avoid fear, those elements,
避免恐懼,不確定的元素,
14:03
and you really embrace those,
而你真的接受這些不確定性,
14:05
and you actually turn them into positives for you, and it's a neat thing to see.
實際上,你把它們看得很正向,這的確很好
14:07
What other brands are like that?
有哪些牌子像這樣呢?
14:10
The first on here is the classic, Apple.
第一個經典品牌,蘋果電腦。
14:12
And you can see here too, Target, Wii,
也有別的牌子,Target,Wii遊戲機,
14:14
Mini from the Mini Coopers, and JetBlue.
Mini Coopers的Mini汽車,JetBlue航空。
14:17
Now there's playful brands and mindful brands,
現在有玩樂的品牌和謹慎的品牌,
14:20
those things that have come and gone,
那些東西,來來去去,
14:22
but a playful, mindful brand is a pretty powerful thing.
但一個玩樂的,又謹慎的品牌是非常強大的。
14:24
MS: A playful, mindful brand. What is your brand?
MS:玩樂的,謹慎的品牌。你的品牌是什麼?
14:27
If somebody asked you to describe your brand identity, your brand personality,
如果有人請你描述你的品牌識別,你的品牌性格,
14:29
what would you be?
你會怎樣說呢?
14:32
Are you an up attribute? Are you something that gets the blood flowing?
你的屬性是向上的?你會令人感到血脈賁張嗎?
14:34
Or are you more of a down attribute?
或者,你的屬性是向下的?
14:37
Are you something that's a little more calm, reserved, conservative?
你是冷靜,內向,保守多一點的呢?
14:39
Up attributes are things like being playful,
上升的屬性是類似玩樂的東西,
14:42
being fresh like the Fresh Prince,
新穎的像是新奇王子(Fresh Prince)一樣,
14:45
contemporary, adventurous,
當代的,冒險的,
14:48
edgy or daring like Errol Flynn,
前衛或大膽的像埃勒爾‧弗林(Errol Flynn),
14:50
nimble or agile, profane, domineering,
或敏捷靈活,世俗的,盛氣凌人,
14:52
magical or mystical like Gandalf.
奇幻的,或神秘的像甘道夫(電影魔戒巫師一腳)。
14:55
Or are you more of a down attribute?
或者,你比較像是向下的屬性?
14:57
Are you mindful, sophisticated like 007?
你謹慎,精明的如007探員?
14:59
Are you established, traditional, nurturing, protective,
你有名,傳統,有教養,保護型,
15:01
empathetic like the Oprah?
有同理心,像歐普拉(Oprah)?
15:04
Are you reliable, stable, familiar,
你可靠,穩定,令人熟悉的,
15:06
safe, secure, sacred,
安全,可靠,神聖,
15:08
contemplative or wise
沉穩,或明智
15:10
like the Dalai Lama or Yoda?
像達賴喇嘛或尤達大師?
15:12
Over the course of this film,
在這部影片的過程中,
15:14
we had 500-plus companies
我們有500多家公司
15:17
who were up and down companies
有向上屬性和向下屬性的公司
15:19
saying, "no," they didn't want any part of this project.
他們都表明“不願意”,不希望參與這個計畫的任何一部分。
15:21
They wanted nothing to do with this film, mainly because they would have no control,
他們希望與此電影無關,主要是因為他們無法掌控,
15:23
they would have no control over the final product.
他們不能掌控的最終的結果。
15:26
But we did get 17 brand partners
但後來,我們確實得到17個品牌的合作贊助
15:28
who were willing to relinquish that control,
他們願意放棄控制,
15:30
who wanted to be in business
他們想要嘗試
15:32
with someone as mindful and as playful as myself
和我一樣謹慎又玩樂的人合作,
15:34
and who ultimately empowered us to tell stories
最後,他們決定讓我們拍攝這部片
15:37
that normally we wouldn't be able to tell --
說出通常我們沒辦法說的事 -
15:39
stories that an advertiser would normally never get behind.
也就是背後有廣告商贊助這件事。
15:42
They enabled us to tell the story about neuromarketing,
他們讓我們說明了一種關於神經行銷的故事,
15:45
as we got into telling the story in this film
我們在影片中說明這件事
15:48
about how now they're using MRI's
他們是如何利用核磁共振成像掃描
15:50
to target the desire centers of your brain
去探測當你看到廣告
15:52
for both commercials as well as movie marketing.
和電影宣傳時你大腦中慾望作用的區塊。
15:54
We went to San Paulo where they have banned outdoor advertising.
我們去了聖保羅,那邊已經禁止戶外廣告。
15:57
In the entire city for the past five years,
整個城市在過去的五年裡,
16:00
there's no billboards, there's no posters, there's no flyers, nothing.
沒有廣告牌,沒有海報,沒有傳單,什麼都沒有。
16:02
(Applause)
(掌聲)
16:05
And we went to school districts
我們去學區
16:07
where now companies are making their way
現在美國有很多學校都資金短缺
16:09
into cash-strapped schools all across America.
廣告公司就挾帶著大筆資金進入校園。
16:11
What's incredible for me is the projects that I've gotten the most feedback out of,
對我來說是難以置信的是,我得到最多回應的計畫,
16:14
or I've had the most success in,
或者我最成功的計劃,
16:17
are ones where I've interacted with things directly.
都是我直接跟對方有互動的計劃
16:19
And that's what these brands did.
而這正是這些品牌在做的
16:21
They cut out the middleman, they cut out their agencies
他們不委託中間人,也不委託廣告公司
16:23
and said, "Maybe these agencies
或者說,這些廣告公司
16:25
don't have my best interest in mind.
無法替我作最大利益的考量。
16:27
I'm going to deal directly with the artist.
我要直接和藝術家交涉。
16:29
I'm going to work with him to create something different,
我要和他一起工作,創造出不同的東西,
16:31
something that's going to get people thinking,
一些會讓人們去思考的東西,
16:33
that's going to challenge the way we look at the world."
那會改變我們看世界的方式。
16:35
And how has that been for them? Has it been successful?
這對他們來說又如何?這樣是成功嗎?
16:37
Well, since the film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, let's take a look.
那麼,既然電影在日舞影展首映,讓我們來看看。
16:39
According to Burrelles, the movie premiered in January,
Burrelles(媒體數據統計公司)表示電影在一月時首映,
16:42
and since then -- and this isn't even the whole thing --
從那時起 - 這還不是全部完整的數據 -
16:45
we've had 900 million media impressions for this film.
我們已經讓這部片有9億的閲讀率。
16:47
That's literally covering just like a two and a half-week period.
這只花了兩個半星期的時間。
16:50
That's only online -- no print, no TV.
只在網路宣傳 - 沒有平面文宣,沒有電視宣傳。
16:52
The film hasn't even been distributed yet.
這部影片甚至還沒有上映。
16:54
It's not even online. It's not even streaming.
它也不在線上播放。也沒有即時觀賞。
16:56
It's not even been out into other foreign countries yet.
甚至沒有賣到其他國家呢。
16:58
So ultimately,
所以,最後,
17:01
this film has already started to gain a lot of momentum.
這部電影已經開始得到很高的氣勢。
17:03
And not bad for a project that almost every ad agency we talked to
結果是不錯的,因爲幾乎每間我們交涉過的廣告公司
17:06
advised their clients not to take part.
都建議他們的客戶不要參與。
17:09
What I always believe
我始終相信
17:11
is that if you take chances, if you take risks,
如果你把握住機會,願意承擔風險,
17:13
that in those risks will come opportunity.
那這些風險會變成機會。
17:15
I believe that when you push people away from that,
我覺得如果你把人往風險小的一邊的話
17:18
you're pushing them more towards failure.
你是把他們更推向失敗的那邊。
17:20
I believe that when you train your employees to be risk averse,
我相信,當你訓練你的員工要規避風險,
17:22
then you're preparing your whole company
最後你是讓整間公司的
17:25
to be reward challenged.
獲利得到挑戰。
17:27
I feel like that what has to happen moving forward
我覺得,當往前邁進的時候
17:29
is we need to encourage people to take risks.
是我們需要鼓勵人們去冒險。
17:31
We need to encourage people to not be afraid
我們要鼓勵人們不要害怕
17:34
of opportunities that may scare them.
可能會讓他們怕的機會。
17:36
Ultimately, moving forward,
最終,向前邁進,
17:38
I think we have to embrace fear.
我們必須接受恐懼。
17:40
We've got to put that bear in a cage.
我們得把那隻熊關在籠子裡。
17:42
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
17:44
Embrace fear. Embrace risk.
擁抱恐懼。擁抱風險。
17:51
One big spoonful at a time, we have to embrace risk.
一次吃一大湯匙Cool Whip吧,我們必須接受的風險。
17:54
And ultimately, we have to embrace transparency.
最終,我們必須接受的透明度。
17:57
Today, more than ever,
今天,比以往任何時候
18:01
a little honesty is going to go a long way.
多一點誠實可以讓你走更長的路。
18:03
And that being said, through honesty and transparency,
雖然是這麽說,透過誠實和透明的過程,
18:05
my entire talk, "Embrace Transparency,"
我的整場演講,“擁抱透明度”
18:08
has been brought to you
最後是由
18:11
by my good friends at EMC,
我在EMC的好朋友,
18:13
who for $7,100
付了7,100塊美金,
18:16
bought the naming rights on eBay.
在Ebay購買了命名權。
18:18
(Applause)
(掌聲)
18:20
EMC: Turning big data
EMC:為世界各地的機構
18:29
into big opportunity
把大量的數據
18:32
for organizations all over the world.
轉變成大的機會。
18:34
EMC presents: "Embrace Transparency."
EMC公司提出了“擁抱透明度。”
18:36
Thank you very much, guys.
非常感謝各位。
18:39
(Applause)
(掌聲)
18:41
June Cohen: So, Morgan,
June Cohen:那麼,摩根,
18:54
in the name of transparency,
以透明度為名,
18:57
what exactly happened to that $7,100?
這7,100塊美金到底用在哪裡呢?
18:59
MS: That is a fantastic question.
MS:這真是個奇妙的問題。
19:01
I have in my pocket a check
我在口袋裡有張支票
19:04
made out to the parent organization to the TED organization,
是要支付給TED的上級組織,
19:07
the Sapling Foundation --
種子基金會(Sapling Foundation) -
19:09
a check for $7,100
一張7,100塊美金的支票
19:11
to be applied toward my attendance for next year's TED.
要用作我明年出席TED的費用。
19:13
(Laughter)
(笑聲)
19:16
(Applause)
(掌聲)
19:18
Translated by Joyce Chou
Reviewed by Wang-Ju Tsai

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About the Speaker:

Morgan Spurlock - Filmmaker
Morgan Spurlock makes documentary film and TV that is personal, political -- and, above all, deeply empathetic.

Why you should listen

Though it was as high-concept as any reality-TV show, Morgan Spurlock's 2004 film Super Size Me was something else entirely: a critique of modern fast-feeding, wrapped in the personal story of a charming, curious host. And "host" can be taken literally: eating only McDonald's for 30 days straight, Spurlock went into a shocking physical and emotional decline, showing via his own body the truth about junk food. After this Oscar-nominated doc came Spurlock's three-seasons-long unscripted TV show, 30 Days, based on another lifehack: Send a person to live, for 30 days, inside another worldview. Stories from 30 Days are human, engaging, surprising: An anti-immigrant activist warms to a tight-knit family of border-crossers; an outsourced US engineer meets the Indian engineer who holds his old job; a former pro football player spends 30 days navigating the world in a wheelchair.

In 2008, Spurlock released Where in the World Is Osama Bin Laden?, about his months-long trek through Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Israel, Palestine ... following leads and interviewing people along the way. (In an interview, he guessed he got within 50 miles of Osama before winding up the hunt.) He was also part of a group-filmed version of Freakonomics. He wrote a book about his fast-food odyssey, called Don't Eat This Book -- while his wife, vegan chef Alex Jamieson, wrote a bestseller about the eight-week cleansing diet she put Spurlock on after he got supersized.

His latest film, The Greatest Movie Ever Sold, dives into the mysterious world of brand sponsorship, a major influence on how pop culture is developed and shared. Almost totally sponsored itself, the film was the first to be sold at Sundance 2011, and, it's said, made a profit before it even opened. The film debuts in US theaters on April 22, 2011.

 

More profile about the speaker
Morgan Spurlock | Speaker | TED.com