English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2007

Richard Branson: Life at 30,000 feet

リチャード・ブランソン 「高度10,000メートルの人生」

Filmed
Views 1,620,221

リチャード・ブランソンがTEDのクリス・アンダーソンを相手に、億万長者としての成功から何度もの死と隣り合わせの経験まで、自身のキャリアの軌跡について語り、さらに彼の(驚くべき)モチベーションの元を明らかにします。

- Entrepreneur
Richard Branson bootstrapped his way from record-shop owner to head of the Virgin empire. Now he's focusing his boundless energy on saving our environment. Full bio

Chris Anderson: Welcome to TED.
Chris Anderson: TEDへようこそ
00:25
Richard Branson: Thank you very much. The first TED has been great.
Richard Branson: ありがとう 
初めてのTEDだ 凄いね
00:26
CA: Have you met anyone interesting?
CA: 興味を引く人に会いましたか?
00:30
RB: Well, the nice thing about TED is everybody's interesting.
RB: TEDのいいところは皆
興味深い人だということだね
00:32
I was very glad to see Goldie Hawn,
ゴールディ・ホーンに会えて凄く嬉しかったよ
00:35
because I had an apology to make to her.
謝らなきゃいけなかったんだ
00:37
I'd had dinner with her about two years ago and I'd --
2年ほど前に彼女と食事をしたんだが
00:40
she had this big wedding ring and I put it on my finger and I couldn't get it off.
彼女の大きな結婚指輪を僕がしたら
取れなくなったんだ
00:45
And I went home to my wife that night
その夜 家に帰ると
00:50
and she wanted to know why I had another woman's big,
何で他の女性のもの凄く大きな
00:53
massive, big wedding ring on my finger.
結婚指輪をしてるんだって妻が訊くんだ
00:55
And, anyway, the next morning we had to go along to the jeweler
翌朝妻と2人で宝石店に行って
00:58
and get it cut off.
切ってもらった
01:00
So -- (Laughter) --
だからゴールディーにゴメンナサイなんだ
(笑)
01:02
so apologies to Goldie.
(笑)
01:06
CA: That's pretty good.
CA: そりゃ傑作ですね
01:07
So, we're going to put up some slides
ではスライドを何枚か見ましょう
01:09
of some of your companies here.
あなたの会社の幾つかですね
01:12
You've started one or two in your time.
1つ2つ創設されましたね
01:14
So, you know, Virgin Atlantic, Virgin Records --
ヴァージン・アトランティック ヴァージン・レコード
01:17
I guess it all started with a magazine called Student.
スチューデント誌がすべての始まりですね
01:20
And then, yes, all these other ones as well. I mean, how do you do this?
そしてこれら多くの会社を創設
秘訣は?
01:23
RB: I read all these sort of TED instructions:
RB: TEDのインストラクションを読んだけど
01:29
you must not talk about your own business, and this,
それには自分の事業のことは語るなとあるのに
01:32
and now you ask me.
今君が訊いてるんだよね
01:34
So I suppose you're not going to be able to kick me off the stage,
だから僕をステージから追い出さないよね
01:35
since you asked the question.
君の質問なんだからね
01:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:39
CA: It depends what the answer is though.
CA: 答えにもよりますね
01:40
RB: No, I mean, I think I learned early on that if you can run one company,
RB: 早い時期に学んだんだ——会社を1つ
経営できればどんな会社も経営できる
01:43
you can really run any companies.
ということをね
01:49
I mean, companies are all about finding the right people,
というのは会社というのは適材を見つけて
01:50
inspiring those people, you know, drawing out the best in people.
彼らにやる気を起こさせ 彼らの持つ
最高のものを引き出すことなんだ
01:54
And I just love learning and I'm incredibly inquisitive
加えて僕は凄く探究する性格で
02:00
and I love taking on, you know, the status quo
現状維持でやってるようなことを見つけて
02:05
and trying to turn it upside down.
それをひっくり返すのが好きなんだ
02:09
So I've seen life as one long learning process.
人生をひとつの長い学びのプロセスと思っている
02:11
And if I see -- you know, if I fly on somebody else's airline
だから あるエアラインに乗って
02:15
and find the experience is not a pleasant one, which it wasn't,
その経験がいいものではなくて
02:19
21 years ago, then I'd think, well, you know, maybe I can create
それは21年前のことだけど 
だからつくれるのではと考えた
02:23
the kind of airline that I'd like to fly on.
自分が乗りたいと思うエアラインをね
02:27
And so, you know, so got one secondhand 747 from Boeing and gave it a go.
それで中古の747を手にいれて始めたんだ
02:30
CA: Well, that was a bizarre thing,
CA: 変わったことをしましたね
02:36
because you made this move that a lot of people advised you was crazy.
何故って 多くの人がクレイジーだという行動をとった
02:37
And in fact, in a way, it almost took down your empire at one point.
事実危うくあなたの帝国は崩壊するところだった
02:42
I had a conversation with one of the investment bankers who,
ある投資銀行家と話したんですが
02:47
at the time when you basically sold Virgin Records
ヴァージン・レコードを売って
02:50
and invested heavily in Virgin Atlantic,
ヴァージン・アトランティックに
02:54
and his view was that you were trading, you know,
多大の投資をしたのは 彼からみると
02:56
the world's fourth biggest record company
世界第4位のレコード会社を
02:59
for the twenty-fifth biggest airline and that you were out of your mind.
第25位のエアラインとトレードするなんて正気ではないと
03:01
Why did you do that?
何故そんなことをしたのですか?
03:05
RB: Well, I think that there's a very thin dividing line between success and failure.
RB: 成功と失敗の境界線はとても微妙なもので
03:07
And I think if you start a business without financial backing,
資金的な後ろ盾なしにビジネスを始めると
03:13
you're likely to go the wrong side of that dividing line.
その境界線のまずい方へと行きがちだ
03:17
We had -- we were being attacked by British Airways.
僕たちはブリティッシュ・エアウェイズに攻撃されていた
03:20
They were trying to put our airline out of business,
僕たちの航空会社を潰そうとして
03:27
and they launched what's become known as the dirty tricks campaign.
後にダーティートリック・キャンペーン
として知られることをやったんだ
03:30
And I realized that the whole empire was likely to come crashing down
それで僕は 帝国全体が崩壊しそうだと気がついた
03:35
unless I chipped in a chip.
なんでも出来る限りやらないと
03:40
And in order to protect the jobs of the people who worked for the airline,
ヴァージン・アトランティックで働く人々の仕事を守り
03:42
and protect the jobs of the people who worked for the record company,
そしてヴァージン・レコードで働く人々の仕事も守るには
03:46
I had to sell the family jewelry to protect the airline.
ヴァージン・アトランティックを保持し 家宝を売らなきゃいけなかった
03:50
CA: Post-Napster, you're looking like a bit of a genius, actually,
CA:ナップスター後の目から見ると
あなたは天才に見えます
03:56
for that as well.
実際のところ
03:59
RB: Yeah, as it turned out, it proved to be the right move.
RB: あれも結果的には正しい行動だった
04:00
But, yeah, it was sad at the time, but we moved on.
ただあの時は悲しかったけどね
前に進まなきゃいけなかった
04:06
CA: Now, you use the Virgin brand a lot
CA: 多くのヴァージンブランドで
04:12
and it seems like you're getting synergy from one thing to the other.
ブランドの相乗効果を得てますね
04:14
What does the brand stand for in your head?
このブランドが意味するものは何ですか
04:17
RB: Well, I like to think it stands for quality,
クオリティーだと
04:20
that you know, if somebody comes across a Virgin company, they --
ヴァージンの会社と接する機会には
皆に感じてほしい
04:22
CA: They are quality, Richard. Come on now, everyone says quality. Spirit?
CA: 誰もがクオリティーと言いますよ
ブランドの精神は?
04:26
RB: No, but I was going to move on this.
RB: 続きがあるんだよ
04:28
We have a lot of fun and I think the people who work for it enjoy it.
僕たちは楽しんでるし
働いている人たちも楽しんでると思う
04:30
As I say, we go in and shake up other industries,
前にも言ったように 他の業界を揺さぶって
04:36
and I think, you know, we do it differently
違ったやり方でやるんだ
04:39
and I think that industries are not quite the same
そうすると参入した業界は元には戻れない
04:43
as a result of Virgin attacking the market.
僕たちがマーケットに攻撃をかけたことでね
04:45
CA: I mean, there are a few launches you've done
CA: 幾つか立ち上げたものの中には
04:47
where the brand maybe hasn't worked quite as well.
上手くいかなかったものもありますね
04:50
I mean, Virgin Brides -- what happened there?
ヴァージン・ブライドとか
何が起こったのですか?
04:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:55
RB: We couldn't find any customers.
RB: お客が見つからなかったんだ
04:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:02
CA: I was actually also curious why --
CA: ちょっと興味があったんですが
05:03
I think you missed an opportunity with your condoms launch. You called it Mates.
Matesという商標のコンドームも
上手く行かなかった
05:05
I mean, couldn't you have used the Virgin brand for that as well?
ヴァージンのブランドを使うわけにはいかなかったんですか?
05:08
Ain't virgin no longer, or something.
もうヴァージンではないからとか
05:12
RB: Again, we may have had problems finding customers.
RB: ここでもお客を見つけるのに苦労した
05:15
I mean, we had -- often, when you launch a company and you get customer complaints,
会社を立ち上げるとカスタマーからクレームを
よくもらったのだけど
05:17
you know, you can deal with them.
そういったものに対処しなければならない
05:23
But about three months after the launch of the condom company,
コンドームを売り出した3ヶ月後に
05:25
I had a letter, a complaint,
クレームの手紙を受け取ってね
05:27
and I sat down and wrote a long letter back to this lady apologizing profusely.
机に向かって その女性に長々
お詫びの手紙を書いたけど
05:30
But obviously, there wasn't a lot I could do about it.
しかしながら僕ができることは殆どなかった
05:34
And then six months later, or nine months after the problem had taken,
それから 6ヶ月か 9ヶ月か経って
05:37
I got this delightful letter with a picture of the baby
赤ちゃんの写真を同封した喜びの手紙を受け取ったんだ
05:43
asking if I'd be godfather, which I became.
僕に名付け親になってくれとあった
それで僕はそうしたんだ
05:46
So, it all worked out well.
全ては上手くいった訳だ
05:51
CA: Really? You should have brought a picture. That's wonderful.
CA: 本当に? 写真を持って来て欲しかった
素晴らしいですね
05:53
RB: I should have.
RB: 持って来ればよかった
05:56
CA: So, just help us with some of the numbers.
CA: 数字の説明をして頂けますか
05:57
I mean, what are the numbers on this?
ここに挙げてある数字は?
05:59
I mean, how big is the group overall?
全体の大きさはどれくらいですか?
06:01
How much -- what's the total revenue?
総売り上げは幾らですか?
06:03
RB: It's about 25 billion dollars now, in total.
RB: 合計で現在約250億ドル
06:05
CA: And how many employees?
CA: 従業員数は?
06:08
RB: About 55,000.
約55,000人だ
06:09
CA: So, you've been photographed in various ways at various times
CA: 様々な場面での写真がありますね
06:12
and never worrying about putting your dignity on the line or anything like that.
威厳のようなものは全然気にしていない
06:16
What was that? Was that real?
この写真は?本物ですか?
06:24
RB: Yeah. We were launching a megastore in Los Angeles, I think.
RB: そうだね たしかロサンジェルスのメガストアの
オープンの時だったと思うな
06:28
No, I mean, I think --
RB: そうだね たしかロサンジェルスのメガストアの
オープンの時だったと思うな
06:31
CA: But is that your hair?
CA: あれはご自分の髪ですか?
06:32
RB: No.
RB:違うね
06:33
CA: What was that one?
CA: こっちは?
06:37
RB: Dropping in for tea.
RB: お茶に行こうとしてるんだ
06:39
CA: OK.
CA: OK
06:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:41
RB: Ah, that was quite fun. That was a wonderful car-boat in which --
RB: 素晴らしいカーボートで凄く楽しかった
06:44
CA: Oh, that car that we -- actually we --
CA: あの車は
06:47
it was a TEDster event there, I think.
あれはTEDメンバーのイベントですね
06:49
Is that -- could you still pause on that one actually, for a minute?
ちょっとここで止めてくれる?
06:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:54
RB: It's a tough job, isn't it?
RB: 辛い仕事だろ?
06:55
CA: I mean, it is a tough job.
CA: まったく辛い仕事ですね
06:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:58
When I first came to America, I used to try this with employees as well
初めてアメリカに来た時は 僕もこんなこと
従業員とやろうとしてたんですが
06:59
and they kind of -- they have these different rules over here,
ここじゃルールが違う
07:03
it's very strange.
なのにおかしいですよね
07:05
RB: I know, I have -- the lawyers say you mustn't do things like that, but --
RB: 弁護士たちは
こんなことしちゃいけないって言うんだが
07:06
CA: I mean, speaking of which, tell us about --
CA: 詳しく教えてください
07:11
RB: "Pammy" we launched, you know --
RB: “Pammy”を立ち上げたんだ
07:12
mistakenly thought we could take on Coca-Cola,
コカコーラと勝負しようなんて気を起こして
07:14
and we launched a cola bottle called "The Pammy"
“Pammy”というボトル入りコーラを立ち上げた
07:16
and it was shaped a bit like Pamela Anderson.
曲線がパメラ・アンダーソンのボディのようなね
07:21
But the trouble is, it kept on tipping over, but --
困ったことに すぐ引っくり返るんだ
07:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:27
CA: Designed by Philippe Starck perhaps?
フィリップ・スタルクのデザイン?
07:30
RB: Of course.
RB: もちろん
07:32
CA: So, we'll just run a couple more pictures here. Virgin Brides. Very nice.
CA: もう少し見ましょう
ヴァージン・ブライド 素敵ですね
07:34
And, OK, so stop there. This was -- you had some award I think?
ここで止めて
何か賞を貰ったのですか?
07:39
RB: Yeah, well, 25 years earlier, we'd launched the Sex Pistols'
RB: これより25年前 セックス・ピストルズを売り出した
07:46
"God Save The Queen," and I'd certainly never expected
“ゴッド・セイヴ・ザ・クイーン” (神よ女王を護り賜え)というアルバムでね
07:51
that 25 years later -- that she'd actually knight us.
25年もたって彼女が 爵位を
授けてくれるなんて思いもしなかった
07:54
But somehow, she must have had a forgetful memory, I think.
どうしたことか 彼女は忘れっぽいらしい
07:57
CA: Well, God saved her and you got your just reward.
CA: 彼女に神のご加護があり
あなたがご褒美をもらった
08:01
Do you like to be called Sir Richard, or how?
サー・リチャードと呼ばれるのは好きですか?
08:04
RB: Nobody's ever called me Sir Richard.
RB: 誰も僕のことをサー・リチャードとは
呼ばないね
08:07
Occasionally in America, I hear people saying Sir Richard
たまに アメリカでサー・リチャードって
言ってるの聞くけど
08:09
and think there's some Shakespearean play taking place.
シェイクスピアでも上演してるのかと思うよね
08:12
But nowhere else anyway.
でも他では聞かないね
08:16
CA: OK. So can you use your knighthood for anything or is it just ...
CA: では称号を何かに使えるということは?
08:20
RB: No. I suppose if you're having problems
RB: ないね でも例えば
08:25
getting a booking in a restaurant or something,
レストランの予約を取るのが難しい時とか
08:29
that might be worth using it.
使えるかも知れない
08:31
CA: You know, it's not Richard Branson. It's Sir Richard Branson.
CA: 「リチャードじゃない
“サー”・リチャードだ」なんて言って
08:32
RB: I'll go get the secretary to use it.
RB: 秘書にやってもらおう
08:37
CA: OK. So let's look at the space thing.
CA: 次は宇宙事業を見てましょう
08:40
I think, with us, we've got a video that shows what you're up to,
ビデオがあります
08:43
and Virgin Galactic up in the air. (Video)
宇宙へ飛ぶヴァージン・ギャラクティック
08:47
So that's the Bert Rutan designed spaceship?
バート・ルータンのデザインの宇宙船?
08:54
RB: Yeah, it'll be ready in -- well, ready in 12 months
RB: そう あと12ヶ月で完成
08:57
and then we do 12 months extensive testing.
そして12ヶ月 徹底的にテストして
09:02
And then 24 months from now,
で今から24ヶ月後
09:05
people will be able to take a ride into space.
宇宙への旅が出来るようになる
09:07
CA: So this interior is Philippe Starcke designed?
CA: 内装のデザインはフィリップ・スタルク?
09:14
RB: Philippe has done the -- yeah, quite a bit of it:
RB: フィリップもかなりの部分やった
09:17
the logos and he's building the space station in New Mexico.
ロゴとニューメキシコの
基地の設計は彼だ
09:22
And basically, he's just taken an eye
彼は目をモチーフにしていて
09:27
and the space station will be one giant eye,
基地自体が一つの巨大な目だ
09:30
so when you're in space,
宇宙にいる時
09:35
you ought to be able to see this massive eye looking up at you.
この巨大な目が自分を見上げているのが見える
09:37
And when you land, you'll be able to go back into this giant eye.
着陸の時はこの目の中に帰還する
09:40
But he's an absolute genius when it comes to design.
デザインとなると彼はまったく天才だ
09:46
CA: But you didn't have him design the engine?
CA: 彼にエンジンの設計はさせなかったでしょう?
09:50
RB: Philippe is quite erratic,
RB: フィリップは全く突飛だ
09:53
so I think that he wouldn't be the best person to design the engine, no.
だからエンジン設計向きとはいえない
ノーだ
09:55
CA: He gave a wonderful talk here two days ago.
CA: 彼は2日前素晴らしいトークをしましたよ
09:59
RB: Yeah? No, he is a --
RB: そう?彼は--
10:01
CA: Well, some people found it wonderful,
CA: ある人は素晴らしいと思った
10:02
some people found it completely bizarre.
他の人はまったく奇妙だと思い
10:04
But, I personally found it wonderful.
でも個人的には素晴らしいと思いました
10:06
RB: He's a wonderful enthusiast, which is why I love him. But ...
RB: 彼はとても一生懸命になる質で
僕は彼をとても気に入っているんだけどね
10:08
CA: So, now, you've always had this exploration bug in you.
CA: いつも冒険の血が騒いでいるようですが
10:14
Have you ever regretted that?
後悔したことは?
10:20
RB: Many times.
RB: 何度もね
10:22
I mean, I think with the ballooning and boating expeditions we've done in the past.
気球やボートでの冒険で後悔したね
10:23
Well, I got pulled out of the sea I think six times by helicopters, so --
6度もヘリコプターで海から引き上げられて
10:30
and each time, I didn't expect to come home to tell the tale.
その度に無事に帰って
この冒険談はできないだろうと思ったよ
10:34
So in those moments,
だからそういった瞬間にはいつも
10:38
you certainly wonder what you're doing up there or --
こんなところで何をしているんだって気持ちになる
10:40
CA: What was the closest you got to --
CA: これまでで一番危なかったのは
10:43
when did you think, this is it, I might be on my way out?
お別れの時だと思ったのはいつでしょう?
10:45
RB: Well, I think the balloon adventures were -- each one was,
RB: 気球での冒険は毎回そう思うね
10:49
each one, actually, I think we came close.
いつも危機一髪だね
10:54
And, I mean, first of all we --
まず第一に
10:57
nobody had actually crossed the Atlantic in a hot air balloon before,
それまで熱気球で
大西洋を渡った人間はいなかった
11:00
so we had to build a hot air balloon that was capable of flying in the jet stream,
ジェット気流の中を飛べる
熱気球を作るんだけど
11:04
and we weren't quite sure,
一体いつジェット気流に突入するのか
解ってなかったんだ
11:11
when a balloon actually got into the jet stream,
一体いつジェット気流に突入するのか
解ってなかったんだ
11:13
whether it would actually survive the 200, 220 miles an hour winds that you can find up there.
時速300キロの風の中で持ちこたえられるのか
上がってみなくては解らない
11:15
And so, just the initial lift off from Sugarloaf to cross the Atlantic,
大西洋横断のためにシュガーローフを
離陸してすぐに
11:21
as we were pushing into the jet stream, this enormous balloon --
ジェット気流のなかに押し出されて大きな気球の
11:27
the top of the balloon ended up going at a couple of hundred miles an hour,
上部は時速数百キロで
11:30
the capsule that we were in at the bottom was going at maybe two miles an hour,
僕たちのいる下部のカプセルは
だいたい時速3キロの状況で
11:35
and it just took off.
突然 離陸したんだ
11:39
And it was like holding onto a thousand horses.
幾千もの馬を掴んでいるみたいだった
11:41
And we were just crossing every finger,
幸運を必死に祈っていたよ
11:45
praying that the balloon would hold together, which, fortunately, it did.
気球が吹き飛ばされないよう祈って
運が良かった
11:48
But the ends of all those balloon trips were, you know --
気球の冒険の終わりは
11:54
something seemed to go wrong every time,
いつも何かが上手くいかない
11:59
and on that particular occasion, the more experienced balloonist who was with me
経験豊富な気球のプロが一緒だったんだが
12:01
jumped, and left me holding on for dear life.
先に飛び込んで僕は一人で必死に気球を掴んでた
12:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:12
CA: Did he tell you to jump, or he just said, "I'm out of here!" and ...
CA: あなたにも飛び込めと言ったのですか?
それとも「お先にー!」と?
12:15
RB: No, he told me jump, but once his weight had gone,
RB: 僕にも飛び込めと言ったけど
彼の重さが無くなったとたん
12:18
the balloon just shot up to 12,000 feet and I ...
気球は4,000メートルまで急上昇して僕は
12:22
CA: And you inspired an Ian McEwan novel I think with that.
CA: イアン・マキューアンの小説のきっかけになった
12:28
RB: Yeah. No, I put on my oxygen mask and stood on top of the balloon,
RB: 酸素マスクをつけて気球の上に立ったんだ
12:31
with my parachute, looking at the swirling clouds below,
パラシュートをつけて 下に渦をまく雲を見て
12:35
trying to pluck up my courage to jump into the North Sea, which --
北海に飛び込もうと勇気を振り絞って
12:38
and it was a very, very, very lonely few moments.
ものすごい究極の孤独な瞬間だった
12:43
But, anyway, we managed to survive it.
だけど どうにか助かった
12:45
CA: Did you jump? Or it came down in the end?
CA: 飛び込んだんですか?
それとも気球が降下?
12:47
RB: Well, I knew I had about half an hour's fuel left,
RB: 30分程度の燃料が残っているのを知っていた
12:49
and I also knew that the chances were that if I jumped,
一方で飛び込んだ場合
12:55
I would only have a couple of minutes of life left.
2分ほどの命だとも解っていた
12:59
So I climbed back into the capsule and just desperately tried
また下部のカプセルに戻って
13:02
to make sure that I was making the right decision.
なんとか正しい判断をしたかった
13:06
And wrote some notes to my family. And then climbed back up again,
家族に手紙を書いて また気球に上がり
13:09
looked down at those clouds again,
もう一度雲を見下ろし
13:13
climbed back into the capsule again.
またカプセルにもどったりして
13:14
And then finally, just thought, there's a better way.
最後にもっといい方法があると気づいた
13:16
I've got, you know, this enormous balloon above me,
自分の上にあるこの巨大な気球は
13:19
it's the biggest parachute ever, why not use it?
最大級のパラシュートだ
これを使おうと
13:22
And so I managed to fly the balloon down through the clouds,
それで気球を使って雲間を降りて行った
13:27
and about 50 feet, before I hit the sea, threw myself over.
そして海に墜落する15メートル位前で
身を投げ出した
13:32
And the balloon hit the sea
そしたら気球は海面に当って
13:36
and went shooting back up to 10,000 feet without me.
無人のまま3,000メートルまで昇っていったんだ
13:38
But it was a wonderful feeling being in that water and --
水の中では素晴らしい気持ちだったよ
13:42
CA: What did you write to your family?
CA: 家族には何と書いたんですか?
13:45
RB: Just what you would do in a situation like that:
RB: そういうときに書くようなことだよ
13:48
just I love you very much. And
すごく愛しているとか
13:52
I'd already written them a letter before going on this trip, which --
この旅に出る前にも手紙を書いてある
13:55
just in case anything had happened.
何かあったときのためにね
14:00
But fortunately, they never had to use it.
幸運なことに一度も必要にならなかったが
14:02
CA: Your companies have had incredible PR value out of these heroics.
CA: こういう冒険談は 会社にとって
すごいPR効果がありますね
14:07
The years -- and until I stopped looking at the polls,
僕が長年調査結果を見ている間はずっと
14:14
you were sort of regarded as this great hero in the U.K. and elsewhere.
英国そして世界中で あなたは
偉大なヒーローとして見られていた
14:19
And cynics might say, you know, this is just a smart business guy
でも皮肉屋は ただの小賢しい事業家で
14:23
doing what it takes to execute his particular style of marketing.
独特のマーケティングをやってるのさと
言うかもしれないですね
14:27
How much was the PR value part of this?
PR目的というのは どれ位ありますか?
14:32
RB: Well, of course, the PR experts said that as an airline owner,
RB: PRのプロいわく
航空会社のオーナーとしては
14:37
the last thing you should be doing is heading off in balloons and boats,
気球やボートに乗って出掛けて
14:44
and crashing into the seas.
海に墜落するなんてのは・・・
14:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:52
CA: They have a point, Richard.
CA: それはもっともですね
14:56
RB: In fact, I think our airline took a full page ad at the time saying,
RB: 実はその頃 全面広告をやってたと思う
14:58
you know, come on, Richard,
「リチャード 大西洋を渡るには
もっといい方法がある」なんてね
15:02
there are better ways of crossing the Atlantic.
「リチャード 大西洋を渡るには
もっといい方法がある」なんてね
15:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:07
CA: To do all this,
CA: こういうことをやるというのは
15:08
you must have been a genius from the get-go, right?
根っからの天才ですね
15:10
RB: Well, I won't contradict that.
RB: 反論はしないよ
15:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:17
CA: OK, this isn't exactly hardball. OK.
CA: 突っ込みが甘かった
15:18
Didn't -- weren't you just terrible at school?
学校ではひどかったとか
15:22
RB: I was dyslexic. I had no understanding of schoolwork whatsoever.
RB: 難読症だったし
学校の授業は全然理解出来なかった
15:26
I certainly would have failed IQ tests.
間違いなくIQテストは落第だね
15:37
And it was one of the reasons I left school when I was 15 years old.
それが15歳で学校をやめた理由の一つだよ
15:40
And if I -- if I'm not interested in something, I don't grasp it.
興味を持てないものはやらない
15:47
As somebody who's dyslexic,
難読症の人間には
15:55
you also have some quite bizarre situations.
おかしなことが起こるんだ
15:56
I mean, for instance, I've had to -- you know,
例えば
15:58
I've been running the largest group of private companies in Europe,
ヨーロッパで最大の企業グループを
経営しているけれど
16:03
but haven't been able to know the difference between net and gross.
ネットとグロスの違いがよく解らなかった
16:06
And so the board meetings have been fascinating.
だから取締役会は面白いよ
16:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:15
And so, it's like, good news or bad news?
でそれは良いニュース 悪いニュースみたいな?
16:16
And generally, the people would say, oh, well that's bad news.
たいてい悪いニュースですって言われるね
16:18
CA: But just to clarify, the 25 billion dollars is gross, right? That's gross?
CA: じゃ 確認のために訊きますが250億ドルはグロス?
16:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:24
RB: Well, I hope it's net actually, having --
RB: ネットだといいけど
16:25
(Laughter) --
(笑)
16:28
I've got it right.
RB: ネットだよね(笑)
16:31
CA: No, trust me, it's gross.
CA: いいえ間違いなくグロスです
16:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:35
RB: So, when I turned 50, somebody took me outside the boardroom and said,
RB: 50歳の時だったか
会議室の外に連れて行かれて
16:38
"Look Richard, here's a -- let me draw on a diagram.
「いいかリチャード 図を描くぞ
16:42
Here's a net in the sea,
海の中にネット(網)がある
16:45
and the fish have been pulled from the sea into this net.
魚がこのネットにかかって揚がってきたとして
16:47
And that's the profits you've got left over in this little net,
この小さなネットに残っているのが利益だ
16:51
everything else is eaten."
他のはもう食われたんだよ」とね
16:54
And I finally worked it all out.
それでやっと解ったんだよ
16:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:00
CA: But, I mean, at school -- so as well as being,
CA: 学校では勉強の成績は最悪だったけれど
17:02
you know, doing pretty miserably academically,
CA: 学校では勉強の成績は最悪だったけれど
17:05
but you were also the captain of the cricket and football teams.
クリケットとサッカーの
キャプテンでしたよね
17:07
So you were kind of a -- you were a natural leader,
一種の生まれながらのリーダー
17:10
but just a bit of a ... Were you a rebel then, or how would you ...
それとも反逆児だったのですか
17:12
RB: Yeah, I think I was a bit of a maverick and -- but I ... And I was,
一匹狼的だったと思うよ
17:18
yeah, I was fortunately good at sport,
ただ運良くスポーツが得意だった
17:26
and so at least I had something to excel at, at school.
少なくとも学校で秀でるものがあった
17:28
CA: And some bizarre things happened just earlier in your life.
CA: 子供の頃とんでもないことを体験したとか
17:33
I mean, there's the story about your mother
お母さんがなさったことがありますよね
17:35
allegedly dumping you in a field, aged four, and saying "OK, walk home."
4歳の時 どこかで放り出され
「じゃあ家まで歩いて帰りなさい」と言われた
17:37
Did this really happen?
というのは本当のことですか?
17:42
RB: She was, you know,
RB: 母は人間は幼い頃から
自分の力でやってくべきだと考えていて
17:43
she felt that we needed to stand on our own two feet from an early age.
RB: 人間は幼い頃から自分の力で
やってくべきだと 母は考えていて
17:45
So she did things to us, which now she'd be arrested for,
だから そういったことを僕らにした
今だったら捕まるね
17:48
such as pushing us out of the car,
車から放り出して
17:52
and telling us to find our own way to Granny's,
自分たちで祖母のとこに辿り着けなんて
17:56
about five miles before we actually got there.
祖母の家までまだ8キロ位あるところで
17:58
And making us go on wonderful, long bike rides.
自転車で長距離旅行させてくれたり
18:02
And we were never allowed to watch television and the like.
テレビなんて絶対に観させてくれなかった
18:05
CA: But is there a risk here?
CA: リスクがありますよね?
18:08
I mean, there's a lot of people in the room who are wealthy, and they've got kids,
ここには子供をがいる人 裕福な人も
多いと思いますが
18:09
and we've got this dilemma about how you bring them up.
子育てにはジレンマがありますよね
18:12
Do you look at the current generation of kids coming up and think
現代の子供たちを見て思いませんか?
18:15
they're too coddled, they don't know what they've got,
大事にされ過ぎて有難みを知らず
18:18
we're going to raise a generation of privileged ...
我々が育てていくのは実に恵まれた世代だと
18:20
RB: No, I think if you're bringing up kids,
RB: 子供を育てるのであれば
18:22
you just want to smother them with love and praise and enthusiasm.
愛情と褒め言葉と強い関心でもって
くるんであげればいいんだよ
18:25
So I don't think you can mollycoddle your kids too much really.
甘やかしてダメにするということではなくね
18:32
CA: You didn't turn out too bad, I have to say, I'm ...
CA: あなた自身は悪い方には
いきませんでしたね
18:38
Your headmaster said to you --
あなたの学校の校長はあなたに
18:41
I mean he found you kind of an enigma at your school --
君のようなワケの分からない人間は
18:43
he said, you're either going to be a millionaire or go to prison,
億万長者になるか監獄に行くかの
どちらかだろうが
18:46
and I'm not sure which.
どっちになるか分からないと言ったとか
18:49
Which of those happened first?
どちらが先でしたか?
18:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:54
RB: Well, I've done both. I think I went to prison first.
両方実現したけど監獄の方が先かな
18:55
I was actually prosecuted under two quite ancient acts in the U.K.
2つの英国の大昔の法律で訴えられたんだ
18:59
I was prosecuted under the 1889 Venereal Diseases Act
1889年の性感染症法と
19:05
and the 1916 Indecent Advertisements Act.
1916年の猥褻広告法の2つ
19:09
On the first occasion, for mentioning the word venereal disease in public, which --
最初のは性病という言葉を
公的な場で使ったことだった
19:11
we had a center where we would help young people who had problems.
僕らは問題を抱えた若者のための
救済センターを持っていて
19:17
And one of the problems young people have is venereal disease.
彼らの抱える問題の一つが性病だった
19:21
And there's an ancient law that says
その昔の法律によると
19:24
you can't actually mention the word venereal disease or print it in public.
性病という言葉を印刷したり
公に言ったりしてはいけない
19:25
So the police knocked on the door, and told us they were going to arrest us
警官がやって来て その性病という言葉を使い続けると
19:29
if we carried on mentioning the word venereal disease.
逮捕することになると言われた
19:32
We changed it to social diseases
「社交病」と表現を変えたら
19:34
and people came along with acne and spots,
ニキビやシミで悩む人が来るようになった
19:36
but nobody came with VD any more.
性病を抱えた若者は来なくなったから
19:38
So, we put it back to VD and promptly got arrested.
表現を性病に戻したらすぐに逮捕された
19:40
And then subsequently, "Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols,"
それからセックス・ピストルズのアルバムの
19:44
the word bollocks, the police decided was a rude word and so we were arrested
「勝手にしやがれ!!」(Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols)で
19:48
for using the word bollocks on the Sex Pistols' album.
“bollocks”が卑猥だと判断されて捕まった
19:55
And John Mortimer, the playwright, defended us.
劇作家のジョン・モーティマーが助けてくれて
19:58
And he asked if I could find a linguistics expert
言語学者を見つけろと言うんだ
20:02
to come up with a different definition of the word bollocks.
bollocksの他の意味を見つけるためにね
20:07
And so I rang up Nottingham University,
それでノッティンガム大学に電話して
20:11
and I asked to talk to the professor of linguistics.
言語学教授と話したいと頼んだ
20:13
And he said, "Look, bollocks is not a -- has nothing to do with balls whatsoever.
この教授は言ったよ
「bollocksはタマとは何の関係もなく
20:15
It's actually a nickname given to priests in the eighteenth century."
18世紀に使われた司祭の俗称ですよ」と
20:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:24
And he went, "Furthermore, I'm a priest myself."
しかも「私自身司祭です」と言うじゃないか
20:27
And so I said, "Would you mind coming to the court?"
だから法廷に来てくれないかと頼むと
20:31
And he said he'd be delighted. And I said --
彼は快諾してくれて
20:33
and he said, "Would you like me to wear my dog collar?"
「司祭服で行きましょうか?」と訊くので
20:35
And I said, "Yes, definitely. Please."
僕は「是非お願いします」と答えた
20:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:39
CA: That's great.
CA: 素晴らしい
20:41
RB: So our key witness argued that it was actually
RB: 彼はこのアルバムタイトルの意味は
20:42
"Never Mind the Priest, Here's the Sex Pistols."
「司祭なんて気にするな」だと証言してくれた
20:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:46
And the judge found us -- reluctantly found us not guilty, so ...
判事はいやいやながら僕らを無罪と認めた
20:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:51
CA: That is outrageous.
CA: 見事ですね
20:52
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:55
So seriously, is there a dark side?
真面目な話 後ろめたい部分は無いんですか
20:57
A lot of people would say there's no way
よく言われるように
21:02
that someone could put together this incredible collection of businesses
これだけの事業を束ねるためには
21:04
without knifing a few people in the back,
人を脅したり 汚いことをしなければ
21:07
you know, doing some ugly things.
不可能だと
21:10
You've been accused of being ruthless.
また冷酷だと非難されたり
21:12
There was a nasty biography written about you by someone.
意地悪な伝記を書いた人がいますね
21:14
Is any of it true? Is there an element of truth in it?
あの本には真実の部分がありますか?
21:16
RB: I don't actually think that the stereotype
RB: 人を踏みつけて上り詰めるビジネスマン
みたいなステレオタイプが
21:20
of a businessperson treading all over people to get to the top,
RB: 人を踏みつけて上り詰めるビジネスマン
みたいなステレオタイプが
21:23
generally speaking, works.
一般的に通用するとは思わない
21:28
I think if you treat people well,
人を良く扱えば
21:30
people will come back and come back for more.
離れていくことはない
21:32
And I think all you have in life is your reputation
この狭い世界で持てるものといえば評判くらいだ
21:37
and it's a very small world.
この狭い世界で持てるものといえば評判くらいだ
21:40
And I actually think that the best way
実際にビジネスリーダーとして成功する最良の方法は
公正に大切に人を扱うことだと思う
21:45
of becoming a successful business leader is dealing with people fairly and well,
実際にビジネスリーダーとして成功する最良の方法は
公正に大切に人を扱うことだと思う
21:49
and I like to think that's how we run Virgin.
ヴァージンでは そうしているつもりだ
21:56
CA: And what about the people who love you and who see you spending --
CA: あなたのご家族はどう見ていますか
22:01
you keep getting caught up in these new projects,
いつも新しいプロジェクトに夢中で
22:05
but it almost feels like you're addicted to launching new stuff.
パーンと新事業を始めることに
夢中の中毒患者みたいで
22:07
You get excited by an idea and, kapow!
パーンと新事業を始めることに
夢中の中毒患者みたいで
22:10
I mean, do you think about life balance?
仕事と生活のバランスについてはどう思います
22:12
How do your family feel about
新しい大事業に飛び込む度に
ご家族はどう感じているでしょう?
22:15
each time you step into something big and new?
新しい大事業に飛び込む度に
ご家族はどう感じているでしょう?
22:17
RB: I also believe that being a father's incredibly important,
RB: 父親であることはとても大事だと信じてるよ
22:20
so from the time the kids were very young,
だから子供たちが凄く小さい頃から
22:24
you know, when they go on holiday, I go on holiday with them.
彼らが休暇に行くときは僕も一緒に行く
22:27
And so we spend a very good sort of three months away together.
休暇先で3ヶ月は一緒に過ごすことになる
22:31
Yes, I'll, you know, be in touch. We're very lucky,
とってもラッキーだと思う
22:37
we have this tiny little island in the Caribbean and we can --
カリブ海にとっても小さな島を持っているので
22:40
so I can take them there and we can bring friends,
僕は子供たちを連れて行き 友達も呼んで
22:44
and we can play together,
一緒に楽しく過ごせる
22:48
but I can also keep in touch with what's going on.
仕事で何が起っているか連絡も取れるしね
22:50
CA: You started talking in recent years
CA: 近年始められた
22:54
about this term capitalist philanthropy.
資本家としての慈善事業について
22:56
What is that?
教えてください
22:58
RB: Capitalism has been proven to be a system that works.
BR: 資本主義はシステムとして機能しているけれど
23:00
You know, the alternative, communism, has not worked.
一方で共産主義は機能しなかった
23:04
But the problem with capitalism is
しかし 資本主義の問題として
23:09
extreme wealth ends up in the hands of a few people,
大きな富はほんの少数の人の手に集中する
23:11
and therefore extreme responsibility, I think, goes with that wealth.
大きな責任がこの富と共にあると僕は思う
23:14
And I think it's important that the individuals,
そうした幸運に恵まれた人は
23:19
who are in that fortunate position, do not end up competing
大きな車や大きな船を持つことを
競いあったりするのではなく
23:23
for bigger and bigger boats, and bigger and bigger cars,
大きな車や大きな船を持つことを
競いあったりするのではなく
23:28
but, you know, use that money to either create new jobs
雇用を生んだり世界の問題に取り組むために
お金を使うべきだ
23:30
or to tackle issues around the world.
雇用を生んだり世界の問題に取り組むために
お金を使うべきだ
23:36
CA: And what are the issues that you worry about most, care most about,
CA: ではあなたが最も気にかけていて
最も力を注ぎたい問題とはなんですか?
23:40
want to turn your resources toward?
CA: ではあなたが最も気にかけていて
最も力を注ぎたい問題とはなんですか?
23:43
RB: Well, there's -- I mean there's a lot of issues.
RB: 問題はいっぱいあるよ
23:47
I mean global warming certainly is a massive threat to mankind
地球温暖化は人類にとって大きな脅威だ
23:50
and we are putting a lot of time and energy into,
僕たちは多くの時間とエネルギーを注いでいる
23:57
A, trying to come up with alternative fuels
まず代替燃料の開発
24:01
and, B, you know, we just launched this prize, which is really a prize
もう一つとして僕たちは賞を設けた
24:05
in case we don't get an answer on alternative fuels,
代替燃料について答えが出なかった場合
24:14
in case we don't actually manage to get the carbon emissions
または炭素ガスの排出を減らせなかった場合
24:18
cut down quickly, and in case we go through the tipping point.
そして限界点を越えてしまった場合
24:21
We need to try to encourage people to come up with a way
地球の大気から炭酸ガスを抽出する方法を
見つけるよう みんなを後押ししなければいけない
24:24
of extracting carbon out of the Earth's atmosphere.
地球の大気から炭酸ガスを抽出する方法を
見つけるよう みんなを後押ししなければいけない
24:28
And we just -- you know, there weren't really people
こういうことをやる人はいなかった
24:31
working on that before, so we wanted people to try to --
世界中の優れた頭脳を持つ人たちに
そのことを考えて欲しいんだ
24:34
all the best brains in the world to start thinking about that,
世界中の優れた頭脳を持つ人たちに
そのことを考えて欲しいんだ
24:38
and also to try to extract the methane
メタンガスも大気から取り除きたい
24:41
out of the Earth's atmosphere as well.
メタンガスも大気から取り除きたい
24:43
And actually, we've had about 15,000 people fill in the forms
15,000人の人から申し込みがあった
24:46
saying they want to give it a go.
これをやってみたいとね
24:51
And so we only need one, so we're hopeful.
1つでも成功すれば良い訳だから
希望は持っている
24:53
CA: And you're also working in Africa on a couple of projects?
CA: アフリカでもいくつかプロジェクトを
進めてますよね
24:56
RB: Yes, I mean, we've got -- we're setting up something called
RB: そうだね
名前が良くないかもしれないけれど
25:00
the war room, which is maybe the wrong word.
「作戦室」というのを立ち上げようとしている
25:04
We're trying to -- maybe we'll change it -- but anyway, it's a war room
名前は多分変えることになると思うが
今は「作戦室」と呼んでいるもので
25:06
to try to coordinate all the attack that's going on in Africa,
アフリカにあるあらゆる社会問題と
それへの取り組みをまとめ上げて
25:10
all the different social problems in Africa,
アフリカにあるあらゆる社会問題と
それへの取り組みをまとめ上げて
25:14
and try to look at best practices.
最良の取組みをを見つけ出そうとしている
25:17
So, for instance,
例えば
25:21
there's a doctor in Africa that's found that
アフリカのある医師が発見したんだ
25:24
if you give a mother antiretroviral drugs at 24 weeks, when she's pregnant,
妊娠24周目に抗レトロウイルス薬を投与すると
25:27
that the baby will not have HIV when it's born.
その赤ちゃんは生まれた時にHIVを持たない
25:33
And so disseminating that information to
だからこの情報を広めて
25:40
around the rest of Africa is important.
アフリカ全土に伝えることが重要だ
25:45
CA: The war room sounds, it sounds powerful and dramatic.
CA: 「作戦室」なんて力強い響きですね
25:47
And is there a risk that the kind of the business heroes of the West
ビジネスで成功した西洋人が勝手にやる気を起こして
25:50
get so excited about -- I mean, they're used to having an idea,
ビジネスで成功した西洋人が勝手にやる気を起こして
25:55
getting stuff done, and they believe profoundly
何かを成し遂げた自分の能力をもってすれば
世界を変えられると信じて疑わず
25:59
in their ability to make a difference in the world.
何かを成し遂げた自分の能力をもってすれば
世界を変えられると信じて疑わず
26:02
Is there a risk that we go to places like Africa and say,
アフリカのような場所に行って
26:04
we've got to fix this problem and we can do it,
何かの問題を解決しなければ
そして私ならできると思って
26:07
I've got all these billions of dollars, you know, da, da, da --
何10億ドル持ってるとか何だかんだと
26:10
here's the big idea. And kind of take a much more complex situation
大風呂敷を広げて更に問題を複雑にして
26:13
and actually end up making a mess of it. Do you worry about that?
実際にはメチャメチャにしてしまう事になるかもしれない こういったことへの危惧はないですか?
26:17
RB: Well, first of all, on this particular situation, we're actually --
RB: そういった状況では実際には
26:22
we're working with the government on it.
僕たちは政府と共に働いている
26:29
I mean, Thabo Mbeki's had his problems with accepting
例えば南アのムベキ大統領には
26:31
HIV and AIDS are related, but this is a way, I think,
HIVとAIDSが関係していると認めることが難しかった
26:35
of him tackling this problem and instead of the world criticizing him,
ただ僕は他の人たちと同じように
彼を非難することよりも
26:40
it's a way of working with him, with his government.
彼と政府と共にこの問題に取り組むことを考える
26:46
It's important that if people do go to Africa and do try to help,
アフリカに行き手助けしようと思うなら
26:49
they don't just go in there and then leave after a few years.
ただ行って2〜3年で帰るのでなく
26:51
It's got to be consistent.
一貫して取り組むことが重要だ
26:54
But I think business leaders can bring their entrepreneurial know-how
だがビジネスリーダーは
起業のやり方を持ち込んで
26:56
and help governments approach things slightly differently.
少し違ったアプローチで
政府を手助けすることができる
27:02
For instance, we're setting up clinics in Africa
例えば僕らはアフリカに
診療所をつくろうとしている
27:06
where we're going to be giving
そこでは
27:09
free antiretroviral drugs, free TB treatment
抗レトロウイルス薬や結核治療
27:11
and free malaria treatment.
そしてマラリア治療を無償で提供する
27:13
But we're also trying to make them self-sustaining clinics,
同時に彼らが自力で維持できる
診療所にしていこうと努力している
27:16
so that people pay for some other aspects.
ある部分では収入を得られるようにね
27:19
CA: I mean a lot of cynics say about someone like yourself, or Bill Gates,
CA: 多くの皮肉屋は あなたやビル・ゲイツのような人たちが
27:23
or whatever, that this is really being -- it's almost driven by
そういった活動をしているのは
27:27
some sort of desire again, you know, for the right image,
よいイメージを作りたかったり
27:30
for guilt avoidance and not like a real philanthropic instinct.
罪悪感を逃れるためであって
本当の慈善の気持ちではないと
27:33
What would you say to them?
彼らに対してどう答えますか?
27:38
RB: Well, I think that everybody --
RB: 誰しも
27:39
people do things for a whole variety of different reasons
人は様々な理由で物事を行うものだ
27:41
and I think that, you know, when I'm on me deathbed,
そして僕は自分の死の床で
27:45
I will want to feel that I've made a difference
自分は人々の生活に違いをもたらしたと感じたい
27:47
to other people's lives.
自分は人々の生活に違いをもたらしたと感じたい
27:50
And that may be a selfish thing to think,
こう考えるのは利己的な事かもしれないが
27:52
but it's the way I've been brought up.
僕はそういう風に育てられたんだ
27:55
I think if I'm in a position to
もし自分が人々の生活を
27:57
radically change other people's lives for the better,
良い方向に変えられる立場にあるとすれば
27:59
I should do so.
そうすべきだと思う
28:02
CA: How old are you?
CA: 今おいくつですか?
28:04
RB: I'm 56.
RB: 56歳
28:05
CA: I mean, the psychologist Erik Erikson says that -- as I understand him
CA: 心理学の素人である私の理解によればですが
28:06
and I'm a total amateur -- but that during 30s, 40s people are driven by
心理学者のエリック・エリクソンいわく30〜40代で人は
28:11
this desire to grow and that's where they get their fulfillment.
成長欲求に突き動かされ
そこに充足感を得る
28:17
50s, 60s, the mode of operation shifts more to the quest for wisdom
50〜60代では 行動様式が
知恵への探求へ
28:22
and a search for legacy.
そして何かを遺そうという方向へと
シフトしていくそうです
28:26
I mean, it seems like you're still
あなたはまだ新たに驚くべき計画を
実行していく成長段階にあるようですね
28:28
a little bit in the growth phases,
あなたはまだ新たに驚くべき計画を
実行していく成長段階にあるようですね
28:30
you're still doing these incredible new plans.
あなたはまだ新たに驚くべき計画を
実行していく成長段階にあるようですね
28:32
How much do you think about legacy,
後世に何かを遺すことに
どう考えていますか?
28:34
and what would you like your legacy to be?
また何をどのように遺したいと思いますか?
28:36
RB: I don't think I think too much about legacy.
RB: それについてはあまり考えていないかな
28:41
I mean, I like to -- you know, my grandmother lived to 101,
祖母は101歳まで生きたことを考えると
28:44
so hopefully I've got another 30 or 40 years to go.
まだ僕には30〜40年あるってことだから
28:50
No, I just want to live life to its full.
というかまず自分の人生を全うしたいと思う
28:54
You know, if I can make a difference,
もし違いを生む事が出来るんなら
29:00
I hope to be able to make a difference.
是非そうしたい
29:02
And I think one of the positive things at the moment is
そして今 この時点で喜ばしいことの一つは
29:04
you've got Sergey and Larry from Google, for instance,
例えばGoogleのセルゲイとラリーがいることだ
29:07
who are good friends.
彼らとはいい友達だけど
29:11
And, thank God, you've got two people
富を持っていて真摯に世界のことを
考えている人が ありがたいことに2人もいる
29:13
who genuinely care about the world and with that kind of wealth.
富を持っていて真摯に世界のことを
考えている人が ありがたいことに2人もいる
29:16
If they had that kind of wealth and they didn't care about the world,
あれ程の富を持ちながら 世界について考えないなら
それはとても憂うべきことだ
29:20
it would be very worrying.
あれ程の富を持ちながら 世界について考えないなら
それはとても憂うべきことだ
29:23
And you know they're going to make a hell of a difference to the world.
彼らはとんでもない変化を世界に
もたらそうとしている
29:25
And I think it's important
ああいった立場にある人間が
変化を起こそうとしていることは重要なことだと思う
29:28
that people in that kind of position do make a difference.
ああいった立場にある人間が
変化を起こそうとしていることは重要なことだと思う
29:30
CA: Well, Richard, when I was starting off in business,
CA: 僕がビジネスを始めた頃
ビジネスについて何もわかっていなくて
29:34
I knew nothing about it and I also was sort of --
CA: 僕がビジネスを始めた頃
ビジネスについて何もわかっていなくて
29:35
I thought that business people were supposed to just be ruthless
ビジネスの世界の人間はただ冷徹に
29:38
and that that was the only way you could have a chance of succeeding.
またそうであることが成功への唯一の道だと思っていました
29:40
And you actually did inspire me. I looked at you, I thought,
でも違うやり方もあるかもしれないと
あなたの生き方は僕に教えてくれました
29:44
well, he's made it. Maybe there is a different way.
でも違うやり方もあるかもしれないと
あなたの生き方は僕に教えてくれました
29:46
So I would like to thank you for that inspiration,
それに気づかせてくれたことに感謝します
29:48
and for coming to TED today. Thank you.
TEDにお越しいただき ありがとうございました
29:51
Thank you so much.
どうもありがとう
29:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
29:54
Translated by Mitsuko Okamoto
Reviewed by DSK INOUE

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Richard Branson - Entrepreneur
Richard Branson bootstrapped his way from record-shop owner to head of the Virgin empire. Now he's focusing his boundless energy on saving our environment.

Why you should listen

He's ballooned across the Atlantic, floated down the Thames with the Sex Pistols, and been knighted by the Queen. His megabrand, Virgin, is home to more than 250 companies, from gyms, gambling houses and bridal boutiques to fleets of planes, trains and limousines. The man even owns his own island.

And now Richard Branson is moving onward and upward into space (tourism): Virgin Galactic's Philippe Starck-designed, The first Burt Rutan-engineered spacecraft, The Enterprise, completed its first captive carry in early 2010 and is slated to start carrying passengers into the thermosphere in 2012, at $200,000 a ticket.

Branson also has a philanthropic streak. He's pledged the next 10 years of profits from his transportation empire (an amount expected to reach $3 billion) to the development of renewable alternatives to carbon fuels. And then there's his Virgin Earth Challenge, which offers a $25 million prize to the first person to come up with an economically viable solution to the greenhouse gas problem.

More profile about the speaker
Richard Branson | Speaker | TED.com