English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2007

Michael Pollan: A plant's-eye view

マイケル・ポーランが植物の視点から語る

Filmed
Views 1,378,305

もし人間の意識は、ダーウィ二ズムの究極かつ最大の目的などではないとしたら? もし私達人間はトウモロコシの世界征服戦略の手先にすぎないとしたら? 作家マイケル ポーランは植物の視点から世界を見ることを推奨します。

- Environmental writer
Michael Pollan is the author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma, in which he explains how our food not only affects our health but has far-reaching political, economic, and environmental implications. His new book is In Defense of Food. Full bio

It's a simple idea about nature.
これは自然についての単純なアイデアです
00:18
I want to say a word for nature
ここ数日 自然についての話をあまり聞かなかったので
00:20
because we haven't talked that much about it the last couple days.
一言 自然のために言いたいことがあります
00:22
I want to say a word for the soil and the bees and the plants and the animals,
土やハチ 植物 そして動物の為に言いたいことがあります
00:24
and tell you about a tool, a very simple tool that I have found.
そして 私が見つけた とても単純な道具について話しましょう
00:29
Although it's really nothing more than a literary conceit; it's not a technology.
それは テクノロジーではなく 文学的発想にすぎないのですが
00:34
It's very powerful for, I think, changing our relationship to the natural world
人間と 自然界 そして人間が依存する他種の生物との関係を変える
00:39
and to the other species on whom we depend.
有力な道具だと思います
00:45
And that tool is very simply, as Chris suggested,
その道具とは クリスが言った様にとても単純です
00:48
looking at us and the world from the plants' or the animals' point of view.
植物や動物の視点から私達人間を見る事です
00:51
It's not my idea, other people have hit on it,
これは 私のアイデアではなく 他の人の思いつきですが
00:56
but I've tried to take it to some new places.
私はそれを新しい地位に持っていこうとしています
01:00
Let me tell you where I got it.
これをどこで思いついたかというと
01:04
Like a lot of my ideas, like a lot of the tools I use,
多くの私のアイデアや 道具達と同じく
01:06
I found it in the garden; I'm a very devoted gardener.
庭で思いつきました 私はガーデニングが大好きなんです
01:09
And there was a day about seven years ago: I was planting potatoes,
7年前のある日 ジャガイモを植えていました
01:13
it was the first week of May --
5月の第一週でした
01:17
this is New England, when the apple trees are just vibrating with bloom;
ニューイングランドでは リンゴの木がちょうど花盛りでした
01:19
they're just white clouds above.
空には白い雲が浮かび
01:24
I was here, planting my chunks,
私はここで 乱切りにしたジャガイモを
01:26
cutting up potatoes and planting it,
植えていました
01:29
and the bees were working on this tree;
蜂はこの木で蜜を集めていて
01:31
bumblebees, just making this thing vibrate.
ハナマルバチが木を揺らしていました
01:34
And one of the things I really like about gardening
庭仕事の良いところの一つは
01:36
is that it doesn't take all your concentration,
人間の集中力の全てを必要としないところです
01:39
you really can't get hurt -- it's not like woodworking --
木工細工と違って 怪我の心配もあまりなく
01:42
and you have plenty of kind of mental space for speculation.
思考をめぐらす精神的余裕がたっぷりあります
01:44
And the question I asked myself that afternoon in the garden,
ハナマルバチのそばで働きながら その日の午後
01:48
working alongside that bumblebee,
自分に問いかけたことは
01:52
was: what did I and that bumblebee have in common?
私とハナマルバチの共通点ってなんだろう?
01:55
How was our role in this garden similar and different?
この庭での我々の役割はどのように相似 また相違しているんだろう?
01:59
And I realized we actually had quite a bit in common:
そして共通点が多い事に気付いたのです
02:03
both of us were disseminating the genes of one species and not another,
お互いに ある特定の遺伝子のみを広め
02:05
and both of us -- probably, if I can imagine the bee's point of view --
そして お互いに -- ハチ側の見解を想像してみても 多分 --
02:11
thought we were calling the shots.
自分達に支配権があると思っていたことでしょう
02:16
I had decided what kind of potato I wanted to plant --
私は どの種類のジャガイモを植えるか自分で決めました
02:18
I had picked my Yukon Gold or Yellow Finn, or whatever it was --
ユーコン・ゴールドかイエロー・フィンか何かを選んで
02:22
and I had summoned those genes from a seed catalog across the country,
それらの遺伝子を 国中の種子を紹介するカタログから集め
02:26
brought it, and I was planting it.
持って帰って植えました
02:31
And that bee, no doubt, assumed that it had decided,
そしてあのハチも きっとこう思っていたでしょう
02:33
"I'm going for that apple tree, I'm going for that blossom,
あのリンゴの木の あの花に行って
02:37
I'm going to get the nectar and I'm going to leave."
蜜を吸って帰ろうと
02:40
We have a grammar that suggests that's who we are;
私達には 我々が自然の中での絶対的主権者だと
02:43
that we are sovereign subjects in nature, the bee as well as me.
示唆する理念が備わっています 私もハチも同じです
02:48
I plant the potatoes, I weed the garden, I domesticate the species.
私がジャガイモを植え 雑草を除き 種を土地に慣らす
02:53
But that day, it occurred to me:
しかしその日 私の心に浮かんだのは
02:59
what if that grammar is nothing more than a self-serving conceit?
もしかすると この理念は利己的な発想にすぎないんじゃないか?
03:01
Because, of course, the bee thinks he's in charge or she's in charge,
もちろん ハチは自分達が取り仕切っていると思っていますが
03:04
but we know better.
我々には分別があるので
03:08
We know that what's going on between the bee and that flower
そのハチと花の関係は ハチが上手く花に
03:10
is that bee has been cleverly manipulated by that flower.
操られているのだということを 良く知っています
03:14
And when I say manipulated, I'm talking about in a Darwinian sense, right?
操られている というのは ダーヴィン的な意味でです わかりますね?
03:18
I mean it has evolved a very specific set of traits --
つまり 花はとても特殊な特質を発達させました
03:21
color, scent, flavor, pattern -- that has lured that bee in.
色、匂い、味、パターンでそのミツバチを誘惑しました
03:24
And the bee has been cleverly fooled into taking the nectar,
そして ハチは見事に騙されて
03:29
and also picking up some powder on its leg,
蜜を吸い 花粉を足につけ
03:33
and going off to the next blossom.
次の花へと飛び立ちます
03:36
The bee is not calling the shots.
ハチは何も仕切ってはいないのです
03:38
And I realized then, I wasn't either.
そこで私は 実は私も同じだと悟ったのです
03:41
I had been seduced by that potato and not another
私はまさしく そのジャガイモに誘惑され それを植え
03:43
into planting its -- into spreading its genes, giving it a little bit more habitat.
遺伝子をばらまき 生育地を少し広げたのです
03:46
And that's when I got the idea, which was, "Well, what would happen
そこで私は 人間に働き掛けているこれらの他の生物種の視点から
03:51
if we kind of looked at us from this point of view of these other species who are working on us?"
私達自身を見たらどうだろうと 思いついたのです
03:55
And agriculture suddenly appeared to me not as an invention, not as a human technology,
そうすると突然 農業は人間の技術でも 創案でもなく
03:58
but as a co-evolutionary development
とても賢い種のグループ、主に食用草が
04:03
in which a group of very clever species, mostly edible grasses, had exploited us,
人間を搾取し 世界中の森林を伐採し尽くすために仕組んだ
04:05
figured out how to get us to basically deforest the world.
進化的共同開発だと気付いたのです
04:11
The competition of grasses, right?
「植物の競争」というやつでしょう
04:16
And suddenly everything looked different.
突然 すべてが違って見えてきて
04:19
And suddenly mowing the lawn that day was a completely different experience.
その日の草刈は 今までと全く違う体験になりました
04:21
I had thought always -- and in fact, had written this in my first book;
それまでは いつもこう思っていました 実はこれは最初の本にも書いたんですが
04:25
this was a book about gardening --
ガーデニングの本ですが
04:28
that lawns were nature under culture's boot,
芝生というものは文化の下に抑制される自然であり
04:29
that they were totalitarian landscapes,
全体主義的な風景であり
04:34
and that when we mowed them we were cruelly suppressing the species
私たちは それを刈る度に 残酷に鎮圧し
04:36
and never letting it set seed or die or have sex.
実を結ばせず 死ぬことも生殖することもさせない
04:40
And that's what the lawn was.
芝生ってそういうものだと
04:44
But then I realized, "No, this is exactly what the grasses want us to do.
でもそこで気付いたのです「いや これこそ草が望んでいることだ
04:46
I'm a dupe. I'm a dupe of the lawns, whose goal in life is to outcompete the trees,
なんて馬鹿なんだ 草の生存目的は 草から日照を奪う
04:50
who they compete with for sunlight."
木を打ち倒すことで 私は草に騙されているんだ」
04:57
And so by getting us to mow the lawn, we keep the trees from coming back,
要は人間に刈ってもらう事で木が生えないようにしているのです
05:00
which in New England happens very, very quickly.
ニュー・イングランドでは かなりの勢いで木が生えます
05:04
So I started looking at things this way
それから 私は物事を植物の視点から見始めて
05:07
and wrote a whole book about it called "The Botany of Desire."
それを「欲望の植物学」という一冊の本にまとめました
05:10
And I realized that in the same way you can look at a flower
そして私はこう思いました 花を観察することで ミツバチの味覚や欲望
05:12
and deduce all sorts of interesting things about the taste and the desires of bees --
例えば 甘いものが好き この色は好きで あの色は好きじゃない
05:16
that they like sweetness, that they like this color and not that color, that they like symmetry --
そして左右対称が好きというように いろんな面白い推定ができるように
05:21
what could we find out about ourselves by doing the same thing?
これを我々に当てはめて見たら なにが見えてくるだろう?
05:27
That a certain kind of potato, a certain kind of drug,
ある種のジャガイモ、ある種の麻薬
05:30
a sativa-indica Cannabis cross has something to say about us.
大麻は我々のことをどう思っているのか
05:33
And that, wouldn't this be kind of an interesting way to look at the world?
これは世間を見るうえで 面白い観点なんじゃないかと思いました
05:39
Now, the test of any idea -- I said it was a literary conceit --
さて、どんなアイデアを試すにしても、ー 奇抜な発想ですがー
05:44
is what does it get us?
我々が得るものは何かという問いもあります
05:48
And when you're talking about nature, which is really my subject as a writer,
そして 作家としての私の主題である自然について語るとき
05:51
how does it meet the Aldo Leopold test?
どうやったらアルド レオポルドのテストを満たすか
05:55
Which is, does it make us better citizens of the biotic community?
すなわち 我々が生物共同体のより良い一員となれるか?
05:58
Get us to do things that leads to the support and perpetuation of the biota,
それは我々を生態の破滅ではなく その維持と
06:02
rather than its destruction?
永続に貢献させるか?
06:09
And I would submit that this idea does this.
私はこのアイデアが そうすると考えます
06:10
So, let me go through what you gain when you look at the world this way,
それでは あなたがこのように 世界を見る事によって
06:12
besides some entertaining insights about human desire.
人間の欲求についての面白い洞察以外に どういう利益があるか見てみましょう
06:15
As an intellectual matter, looking at the world from other species' points of view
知的な問題としては 他種の見解から世界を見ることは
06:20
helps us deal with this weird anomaly,
奇妙な変則にどう対処するべきかを教えてくれます
06:27
which is -- and this is in the realm of intellectual history --
それは --そして これは文化史の分野です--
06:30
which is that we have this Darwinian revolution 150 years ago ...
150年前にダーウィン革命がありました
06:34
Ugh. Mini-Me. (Laughter)
うわっ、ミニ・ミーだ
06:39
We have this intellectual, this Darwinian revolution in which, thanks to Darwin,
この知的なダーウィン革命のおかげで
06:44
we figured out we are just one species among many;
我々は沢山の種のなかの一種にすぎないことを知りました
06:50
evolution is working on us the same way it's working on all the others;
我々に起こっている進化は 同じように他のすべての種の上に起こっているのです
06:52
we are acted upon as well as acting;
我々は作用すると共に作用されています
06:56
we are really in the fiber, the fabric of life.
私達は実に生命というものの生地に存在しています
06:58
But the weird thing is, we have not absorbed this lesson 150 years later;
しかし 奇妙なことに 150年経っても この教訓は浸透していません
07:02
none of us really believes this.
本当に信じている人はいません
07:06
We are still Cartesians -- the children of Descartes --
私達はまだデカルト派 デカルト・チルドレンなのです
07:08
who believe that subjectivity, consciousness, sets us apart;
主観性と意識が我々を特殊な存在とし
07:13
that the world is divided into subjects and objects;
世界は主体と物体に分かれていて
07:18
that there is nature on one side, culture on another.
自然が一方にあり 他方に文化があると信じています
07:21
As soon as you start seeing things from the plant's point of view or the animal's point of view,
植物や動物の視点から見て初めて
07:24
you realize that the real literary conceit is that --
本当の奇妙なアイデアとは
07:29
is the idea that nature is opposed to culture,
自然が文化と対立するというアイデア
07:33
the idea that consciousness is everything --
意識が全てだというアイデアだと解ります
07:37
and that's another very important thing it does.
そして他にも重要な役割を果します
07:41
Looking at the world from other species' points of view
他生物の視点から世界を見ることは
07:44
is a cure for the disease of human self-importance.
人間中心社会という病の治療法になります
07:47
You suddenly realize that consciousness --
あなたは突然こう気付くでしょう
07:51
which we value and we consider
私達が自然の最高の業績と思っている
07:56
the crowning achievement of nature,
人間の意識とは
08:00
human consciousness -- is really just another set of tools for getting along in the world.
地球でうまく生きていくための道具に過ぎないと
08:02
And it's kind of natural that we would think it was the best tool.
ある意味 それが最高の道具だと思うのも自然なことです
08:07
But, you know, there's a comedian who said,
あるコメディアンがこう言いました
08:11
"Well, who's telling me that consciousness is so good and so important?
「じゃあ、いったい誰が意識がこんなに重要で素晴らしい物だと主張してるんだ?」
08:13
Well, consciousness."
「それは意識だ」
08:17
So when you look at the plants, you realize that there are other tools
植物を見ると それらは別の道具で
08:19
and they're just as interesting.
同じように興味深いと気付くでしょう
08:23
I'll give you two examples, also from the garden:
例を二つ挙げましょう これも庭からです
08:25
lima beans. You know what a lima bean does when it's attacked by spider mites?
ライ豆がハダニに襲われる時に何をするかご存知でしょうか
08:29
It releases this volatile chemical that goes out into the world
揮発性のケミカルを広範囲に発して
08:34
and summons another species of mite
ハダニを攻撃して ライ豆を守ってくれる
08:37
that comes in and attacks the spider mite, defending the lima bean.
他種のダニを呼び寄せます
08:40
So what plants have -- while we have consciousness, tool making, language,
人間に意識や 道具作り 言語等がある一方
08:44
they have biochemistry.
植物にはバイオケミストリーがあります
08:50
And they have perfected that to a degree far beyond what we can imagine.
それは 我々の想像を越えるレベルまで達しています
08:52
Their complexity, their sophistication, is something to really marvel at,
植物の複雑性といい洗練された性質といい 実に驚異的です
08:57
and I think it's really the scandal of the Human Genome Project.
そして 人には4、5万の遺伝子があると思って始めた
09:02
You know, we went into it thinking, 40,000 or 50,000 human genes
ヒトゲノム解析計画が たったの2万3千という結果に終わったのは
09:04
and we came out with only 23,000.
全くのスキャンダルだと思います
09:09
Just to give you grounds for comparison, rice: 35,000 genes.
比較の基盤を挙げると 稲には3万5千の遺伝子があります
09:13
So who's the more sophisticated species?
では より洗練されている種はどっちでしょうか
09:21
Well, we're all equally sophisticated.
答えはどっちもです
09:24
We've been evolving just as long,
同じ期間を共に進化してきました
09:25
just along different paths.
通った道が違うだけです
09:28
So, cure for self-importance, way to sort of make us feel the Darwinian idea.
なので 自己中心の治療法でもあり ダーウィンの考えを実感する方法でもあります
09:31
And that's really what I do as a writer, as a storyteller,
私が作家としてやっているのはそういうことで 物語の語り手として
09:39
is try to make people feel what we know and tell stories that actually
人々に私達が知っていることを感じてもらい そして環境意識を考えさせるような
09:42
help us think ecologically.
物語を語ることです
09:49
Now, the other use of this is practical.
もう一つの例はとても実用的です
09:50
And I'm going to take you to a farm right now,
今から皆さんをある農場へと連れていきます
09:52
because I used this idea to develop my understanding of the food system
私はこのアイデアを使って フードシステムの理解を深めたわけですが
09:54
and what I learned, in fact, is that we are all, now, being manipulated by corn.
そこから学んだことは 我々が今トウモロコシに操られているということです
09:58
And the talk you heard about ethanol earlier today,
今日皆さんもお聞きになったエタノールの話は
10:03
to me, is the final triumph of corn over good sense. (Laughter) (Applause)
これは良識に対するトウモロコシの最終的な勝利です (笑)
10:08
It is part of corn's scheme for world domination.
トウモロコシの世界征服にむけての陰謀の一部なのです
10:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:21
And you will see, the amount of corn planted this year will be up dramatically from last year
また今年植えられたトウモロコシの量も去年をずっと上回るでしょう
10:22
and there will be that much more habitat
我々がエタノールを救世主に仕立て上げたおかげで
10:26
because we've decided ethanol is going to help us.
トウモロコシの生育地も増えるでしょう
10:28
So it helped me understand industrial agriculture,
私にとって これは農産業を理解する上で役に立ちました
10:30
which of course is a Cartesian system.
もちろん 農産業はデカルト式です
10:34
It's based on this idea that we bend other species to our will
他の種を利用するという概念に基づいています
10:36
and that we are in charge, and that we create these factories
私達が主権者であり 私達が工場を作ります
10:39
and we have these technological inputs and we get the food out of it
これらの技術を取り入れて 食品を生産し
10:42
or the fuel or whatever we want.
燃料や 望むものは何でも作り出します
10:45
Let me take you to a very different kind of farm.
一風変わった農場へとご案内しましょう
10:48
This is a farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.
この農場はバージニア州のシェナンドア川流域にあります
10:50
I went looking for a farm where these ideas
私は他の生物種の視点から見るというアイデアを
10:53
about looking at things from the species' point of view are actually implemented,
実際に取り入れている農場を探しにいって
10:56
and I found it in a man. The farmer's name is Joel Salatin.
そしてジョール・サラチンという農場主に出会い
11:00
And I spent a week as an apprentice on his farm,
彼の農場で一週間ほど見習いとして働きました
11:02
and I took away from this some of the most hopeful news about our relationship to nature
そして私は、過去25年間自然に関して執筆してきた中で
11:05
that I've ever come across in 25 years of writing about nature.
我々と自然の関係において最も有望な情報を手に入れました
11:11
And that is this:
これです
11:14
the farm is called Polyface, which means ...
ポリーフェイスという農場で
11:15
the idea is he's got six different species of animals, as well as some plants,
6種類の動物と いく種かの植物を
11:18
growing in this very elaborate symbiotic arrangement.
とても巧妙な 象徴的な配置で育てるというアイデアです
11:22
It's permaculture, those of you who know a little bit about this,
パーマ・カルチャーと言いますが
11:25
such that the cows and the pigs and the sheep and the turkeys and the ...
彼の場合は牛 豚 羊 七面鳥 そして。。。
11:27
what else does he have?
他に何でしたっけ。。。
11:35
All the six different species -- rabbits, actually --
6種の全てが -- そうだ ウサギだ --
11:37
are all performing ecological services for one another,
全てがお互いのために生態的なサービスを行います
11:39
such that the manure of one is the lunch for the other
ある動物のフンは他種のランチになったり
11:42
and they take care of pests for one another.
お互いの害虫を処理したり
11:45
It's a very elaborate and beautiful dance,
とても精巧で美しい一連の流れですが
11:47
but I'm going to just give you a close-up on one piece of it,
その一部のみをクローズアップしてご紹介しましょう
11:50
and that is the relationship between his cattle and his chickens, his laying hens.
牛と産卵鶏の関係ですが この方法でどういう利益が得られるかをご紹介します
11:53
And I'll show you, if you take this approach, what you get, OK?
これは単に食料を育てるという範囲を超え
11:59
And this is a lot more than growing food, as you'll see;
自然に対する考え方を改め
12:04
this is a different way to think about nature
デカルト的なゼロサムゲーム論
12:06
and a way to get away from the zero-sum notion,
我々が欲しいものを得ることで自然が消滅する
12:08
the Cartesian idea that either nature's winning or we're winning,
自然が勝つか人間が勝つかというアイデアから
12:12
and that for us to get what we want, nature is diminished.
我々を自由にしてくれる方法です
12:15
So, one day, cattle in a pen.
さて 牛を囲いの中に1日おきます
12:19
The only technology involved here is this cheap electric fencing:
ここにあるテクノロジーは 車のバッテリーに接続した
12:21
relatively new, hooked to a car battery;
この安い 結構新しい電気柵のみです
12:24
even I could carry a quarter-acre paddock, set it up in 15 minutes.
こんな私でも1000平方Mの農場を歩き15分で建てられます
12:26
Cows graze one day. They move, OK?
牛は一日食べてまた移動します
12:30
They graze everything down, intensive grazing.
すべての草を集中的に食べます
12:34
He waits three days,
3日間ほど待って
12:36
and then we towed in something called the Eggmobile.
それからエッグ・モビールというモノを引っ張って行きます
12:38
The Eggmobile is a very rickety contraption --
これは今にも壊れそうな奇妙な装置で
12:41
it looks like a prairie schooner made out of boards --
板で出来ているほろ馬車みたいなモノですが
12:44
but it houses 350 chickens.
350羽もの鶏が入ります
12:47
He tows this into the paddock three days later and opens the gangplank,
これを3日間後に農場に引っ張り出してきて 渡し板を下ろします
12:49
turns them down, and 350 hens come streaming down the gangplank --
そうすると350羽の鶏が群れを成して板の上を暴走して
12:55
clucking, gossiping as chickens will --
コッコッと鳴きながら降りてきて
12:59
and they make a beeline for the cow patties.
牛のフンに向かって一直線です
13:01
And what they're doing is very interesting:
その後の行動が興味深いです
13:06
they're digging through the cow patties
牛のフンを掘り返し
13:08
for the maggots, the grubs, the larvae of flies.
ウジ虫などハエの幼虫を探します
13:10
And the reason he's waited three days
3日待った理由は
13:14
is because he knows that on the fourth day or the fifth day, those larvae will hatch
4日また5日間経ったら幼虫が孵化してしまうからです
13:16
and he'll have a huge fly problem.
そうすると ハエに悩まされます
13:21
But he waits that long to grow them as big and juicy and tasty as he can
しかし大きくて、ジューシーな幼虫になるまで待つのです
13:23
because they are the chickens' favorite form of protein.
プロテインも取れて 鶏の大好物でもあるからです
13:29
So the chickens do their kind of little breakdance
鶏がブレイクダンスのような動きで
13:32
and they're pushing around the manure to get at the grubs,
ウジ虫を掘り出すため フンをつつきまわして
13:34
and in the process they're spreading the manure out.
大量の肥料がまきちらされるのです
13:38
Very useful second ecosystem service.
とても便利です。それが第2の生態的サービスで
13:41
And third, while they're in this paddock
また第3は、鶏が農場にいる間にもちろん
13:45
they are, of course, defecating madly
狂った様に排便していて
13:48
and their very nitrogenous manure is fertilizing this field.
そのフンもまた窒素肥料で、草原に栄養を与えます
13:51
They then move out to the next one,
それから次の場所へ移動します
13:57
and in the course of just a few weeks, the grass just enters this blaze of growth.
3週間後には草でぼうぼうになり 4、5週間目以内に
13:59
And within four or five weeks, he can do it again.
また繰り返します
14:07
He can graze again, he can cut, he can bring in another species,
彼は また放牧することも 刈る事もでき 羊のように
14:09
like the lambs, or he can make hay for the winter.
他の動物を使うこともできます または冬の為に干草を作ることも出来ます
14:12
Now, I want you to just look really close up onto what's happened there.
さて この農場で起こったことをよく考えてみてください
14:17
So, it's a very productive system.
大変生産性の高いシステムです
14:21
And what I need to tell you is that on 100 acres
このたった404,700平方Mで
14:22
he gets 40,000 pounds of beef; 30,000 pounds of pork; 25,000 dozen eggs;
牛肉18181キロ、豚肉13636キロ、卵25,000ダース
14:24
20,000 broilers; 1,000 turkeys; 1,000 rabbits --
若鶏2万羽、七面鳥1千羽、ウサギ1千羽という
14:29
an immense amount of food.
莫大な食料が生産されます
14:32
You know, you hear, "Can organic feed the world?"
「オーガニックだけで世界が食っていけるか」
14:34
Well, look how much food you can produce on 100 acres if you do this kind of ...
これを耳にする事あると思いますが、これだけの土地でこれだけ生産が出来るのです
14:36
again, give each species what it wants,
それぞれの生物種が欲しているモノを与え
14:41
let it realize its desires, its physiological distinctiveness.
欲望や生理的独自性に気付かせるだけです
14:44
Put that in play.
それを活かすのです
14:48
But look at it from the point of view of the grass, now.
では 草の視点から見てみましょう
14:50
What happens to the grass when you do this?
これをやると草には何が起きるのでしょう
14:53
When a ruminant grazes grass, the grass is cut from this height to this height,
反芻動物が草を食べると、葉がこの高さからこの高さまで切られるわけです
14:55
and it immediately does something very interesting.
すると反射的に面白い事をします
15:01
Any one of you who gardens knows that there is something called the root-shoot ratio,
根と新芽の比率は ガーデニングをする人なら誰でも知っています
15:03
and plants need to keep the root mass
植物がよく育つには その根と葉の部分を
15:07
in some rough balance with the leaf mass to be happy.
バランス良く保たなければなりません
15:11
So when they lose a lot of leaf mass, they shed roots;
ですから葉が減ると根も小さくします
15:14
they kind of cauterize them and the roots die.
自らの根を焼灼する様な行動をし
15:18
And the species in the soil go to work
根が死んでいくと土の中の生物種
15:21
basically chewing through those roots, decomposing them --
ミミズ 菌類 バクテリアなどが根を食べて
15:24
the earthworms, the fungi, the bacteria -- and the result is new soil.
分解されたものが新しい土となります
15:28
This is how soil is created.
土はこういう風に作られます
15:34
It's created from the bottom up.
下から上にと
15:37
This is how the prairies were built,
大草原もこういう風に
15:38
the relationship between bison and grasses.
野牛と草の関係で作られたのです
15:40
And what I realized when I understood this --
これを理解して気付いたことは ―
15:43
and if you ask Joel Salatin what he is, he'll tell you he's not a chicken farmer,
また もしジョール・サラチンに何を育ているかを訪ねるとしたら、鶏ではなく
15:46
he's not a sheep farmer, he's not a cattle rancher; he's a grass farmer,
羊でもなければ牛でもなく 草を育ていると答えるでしょう
15:50
because grass is really the keystone species of such a system --
なぜなら草はこういったシステムの要石の生物だからです
15:55
is that, if you think about it, this completely contradicts the tragic idea of nature we hold in our heads,
― 気付いたことは 我々が持っている自然に関する悲惨な発想と完全に相反するということです
15:59
which is that for us to get what we want, nature is diminished.
我々が欲している物を手に入れることで自然が死んでいくことですね
16:08
More for us, less for nature.
人間の勝ち 自然の負け
16:14
Here, all this food comes off this farm, and at the end of the season
この農場からこれだけの食料が取れて、しかも季節が終わると
16:16
there is actually more soil, more fertility and more biodiversity.
そこには より多くの土壌や肥沃 そして生物多様性があります
16:21
It's a remarkably hopeful thing to do.
これは 大変希望に満ちたことです
16:28
There are a lot of farmers doing this today.
今日 多くの農家がこの方法を取り入れています
16:31
This is well beyond organic agriculture,
これは多少デカルト的なシステムである有機農業より
16:33
which is still a Cartesian system, more or less.
遥かに優れています
16:36
And what it tells you is that if you begin to take account of other species,
これは何を示すかというと もし他の生物種や土壌に注意を払えば
16:39
take account of the soil, that even with nothing more than this perspectival idea
この たったの視点的アイデアのみで
16:45
-- because there is no technology involved here except for those fences,
-- この柵以外には何のテクノロジーもいらず
16:52
which are so cheap they could be all over Africa in no time --
安価なので、アフリカでもあっという間に広まる可能性があります --
16:56
that we can take the food we need from the Earth
我々は地球から必要な食物を得ると共に
17:01
and actually heal the Earth in the process.
地球を癒す事も出来るのです
17:05
This is a way to reanimate the world,
これが世界を生き返らせる方法です
17:10
and that's what's so exciting about this perspective.
これこそが素晴らしいところです
17:12
When we really begin to feel Darwin's insights in our bones,
ダーウィンの洞察を骨まで感じ始めたら
17:14
the things we can do with nothing more than these ideas
こういった発想のみで実現出来る事こそが
17:18
are something to be very hopeful about.
希望を抱く価値のある事です
17:23
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございます
17:25

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Michael Pollan - Environmental writer
Michael Pollan is the author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma, in which he explains how our food not only affects our health but has far-reaching political, economic, and environmental implications. His new book is In Defense of Food.

Why you should listen

Few writers approach their subjects with the rigor, passion and perspective that's typical of Michael Pollan. Whereas most humans think we are Darwin's most accomplished species, Pollan convincingly argues that plants — even our own front lawns — have evolved to use us as much as we use them.

The author and New York Times Magazine contributor is, as Newsweek asserts, “an uncommonly graceful explainer of natural science,” for his investigative stories about food, agriculture, and the environment. His most recent book, The Omnivore's Dilemma, was named one of the top ten nonfiction titles of 2006.

As the director of the Knight Program in Science and Environmental Journalism at UC Berkeley, Pollan is cultivating the next generation of green reporters.

More profile about the speaker
Michael Pollan | Speaker | TED.com