English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2008

Chris Abani: On humanity

クリス・アバニ 人間性を熟考する

Filmed
Views 850,101

クリス・アバニは人の物語を語ります: 兵隊に立ち向かう人々。同情的な人々。人間的で、彼らの人間性を取り戻そうとしている人々。 それを彼は、「Ubuntu」と言います: 私が人間的でいる唯一の方法は、あなたが私の人間性を反射し返してくれることです。

- Novelist, poet
Imprisoned three times by the Nigerian government, Chris Abani turned his experience into poems that Harold Pinter called "the most naked, harrowing expression of prison life and political torture imaginable." His novels include GraceLand (2004) and The Virgin of Flames (2007). Full bio

My search is always to find ways to chronicle,
僕の探索は たいてい 平凡な人々の物語を共有したり文書にしたり
00:18
to share and to document stories about people, just everyday people.
年代順に記録する方法を見つけることにあります
00:23
Stories that offer transformation, that lean into transcendence,
変化を提供し 超越へと身を乗り出す物語
00:28
but that are never sentimental,
しかし 決して感傷的でなく
00:33
that never look away from the darkest things about us.
僕らの最も暗い所から 決して目をそらさない物語です
00:35
Because I really believe that we're never more beautiful
なぜなら僕は 僕達が最も醜い時ほど美しい時はないと
00:39
than when we're most ugly.
本当に信じているからです
00:42
Because that's really the moment we really know what we're made of.
それは その瞬間にこそ 僕らが本当に何で出来ているかを 知る瞬間だからです
00:44
As Chris said, I grew up in Nigeria
クリスが言ったように 僕は
00:48
with a whole generation -- in the '80s --
80年代の学生世代全員が
00:53
of students who were protesting a military dictatorship, which has finally ended.
今は終りを告げた軍事独裁政権に抗議していた ナイジェリアで育ちました
00:55
So it wasn't just me, there was a whole generation of us.
そうです 僕だけではなく 僕の世代の皆です
01:01
But what I've come to learn
そこで 僕が学んだことは
01:03
is that the world is never saved in grand messianic gestures,
世界は決して 壮大で救世主的な振る舞いよっては救われず
01:06
but in the simple accumulation of gentle, soft, almost invisible acts of compassion,
穏やかで 優しい ほとんど見えない同情的な行為 日常的に行われる同情的行為の
01:10
everyday acts of compassion.
単純な積み重ねによって救われるということです
01:17
In South Africa, they have a phrase called Ubuntu.
南アフリカには Ubuntu というフレーズがあります
01:19
Ubuntu comes out of a philosophy that says,
Ubuntu とは哲学的思想でこういう意味です
01:26
the only way for me to be human is for you to reflect
私が人間でいられるのは あなたが私の人間性を
01:28
my humanity back at me.
私に反映し返してくれるからです
01:32
But if you're like me, my humanity is more like a window.
でももし あなたが僕のようであれば 僕の人間性は窓のようです
01:34
I don't really see it, I don't pay attention to it
普段 見もしなければ 気にもしない
01:38
until there's, you know, like a bug that's dead on the window.
たとえば 死んだ虫が張り付いてでもいないかぎり
01:40
Then suddenly I see it, and usually, it's never good.
そこで僕は やっと人間性を見るのですが 良いことなどまったくありません
01:43
It's usually when I'm cussing in traffic
普段 運転中に誰かに悪態をつくとき
01:47
at someone who is trying to drive their car and drink coffee
運転しながらコーヒーを飲もうとしたり
01:50
and send emails and make notes.
メールを送ったり ノートを取ったりしている人にです
01:53
So what Ubuntu really says
だから Ubuntu が本当に言うところは
01:57
is that there is no way for us to be human without other people.
他人の存在なしに僕らが人間でいられることはない
02:00
It's really very simple, but really very complicated.
とても単純です そして 複雑です
02:05
So, I thought I should start with some stories.
だから 物語からはじめようと思いました
02:08
I should tell you some stories about remarkable people,
素晴らしい人々物語について話すことにして
02:11
so I thought I'd start with my mother.
僕の母親から始めます
02:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:16
And she was dark, too.
彼女も黒人でした
02:17
My mother was English.
母はイギリス人でした
02:19
My parents met in Oxford in the '50s,
両親は50年代にオックスフォードで出会い
02:20
and my mother moved to Nigeria and lived there.
母はナイジェリアに移りそこに住みました
02:22
She was five foot two, very feisty and very English.
彼女は5フィート2(1.5m)でした 非常に勝気で 全くのイギリス人でした
02:24
This is how English my mother is -- or was, she just passed.
彼女がどれほどイギリス人か -- だったか 彼女は亡くなったばかりです
02:28
She came out to California, to Los Angeles, to visit me,
母がカリフォルニアのロサンジェルスに僕を訪ねて来た時
02:31
and we went to Malibu, which she thought was very disappointing.
僕らはマリブに行ったのですが 母には期待外れだったようです
02:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:37
And then we went to a fish restaurant,
それから僕らは魚料理のレストランに行き
02:39
and we had Chad, the surfer dude, serving us,
チャドというサーファー男のウェイターが
02:41
and he came up and my mother said,
テーブルに来たとき 母は聞きました
02:44
"Do you have any specials, young man?"
「何かスペシャルはありますか?」
02:46
And Chad says, "Sure, like, we have this, like, salmon,
チャドは言いました「もちろん たとえば鮭が
02:48
that's, like, rolled in this, like, wasabi, like, crust.
わさびなんかや パイ皮なんかに 包まったみたいになってるやつとか
02:52
It's totally rad."
めちゃくちゃ うまいよ」
02:54
And my mother turned to me and said,
母は私に向き直り
02:56
"What language is he speaking?"
「彼は何語を話しているの?」
02:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:01
I said, "English, mum."
僕が「英語だよ お母さん」と言うと
03:02
And she shook her head and said,
彼女は首を振りながら言いました
03:04
"Oh, these Americans. We gave them a language,
「まったく アメリカ人っていうのは 私達が言語を与えたのに
03:06
why don't they use it?"
なぜ 使わないのかしら?」
03:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:10
So, this woman, who converted from the Church of England
それで 父と結婚したとき 英国国教会
03:16
to Catholicism when she married my father --
からカトリック教に改宗したこの女性-
03:20
and there's no one more rabid than a Catholic convert --
そして カトリック改宗者より過激な人はいません-
03:22
decided to teach in the rural areas in Nigeria,
母はナイジェリアの農村地帯の
03:26
particularly among Igbo women,
特にイボ族の女性の間で
03:30
the Billings ovulation method,
カトリック教会による唯一の承認された避妊方法
03:32
which was the only approved birth control by the Catholic Church.
ビリングズ排卵法を教えることを決心します
03:34
But her Igbo wasn't too good.
でも彼女はイボ語があまり話せず
03:38
So she took me along to translate.
通訳に僕を連れて行きました
03:42
I was seven.
僕は7歳でした
03:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:46
So, here are these women,
配偶者と月経について
03:47
who never discuss their period with their husbands,
話をしたことのない それらの女性達に
03:49
and here I am telling them, "Well, how often do you get your period?"
僕は言います 「どれくらいの頻度で月経がありますか?」
03:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:56
And, "Do you notice any discharges?"
出血に気づきますか?
03:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:59
And, "How swollen is your vulva?"
あなたの陰門は腫れますか?
04:00
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:02
She never would have thought of herself as a feminist,
彼女は自分をフェミニストとして考えたことはありません
04:07
my mother, but she always used to say,
でも 母はよくこういいました
04:10
"Anything a man can do, I can fix."
「男に出来ることで 私に直せないものはない」
04:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
04:16
And when my father complained about this situation,
僕の父は 7歳の少年を
04:23
where she's taking a seven-year-old boy
避妊教育に連れて行くという
04:28
to teach this birth control, you know,
この状況に文句があり
04:30
he used to say, "Oh, you're turning him into --
こう言いました「おまえは息子を
04:32
you're teaching him how to be a woman."
女にする教育をしている」
04:34
My mother said, "Someone has to."
母は言いました「誰かがやらなきゃいけないことよ」
04:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:38
This woman -- during the Biafran war,
ビアフラ内戦中
04:39
we were caught in the war.
僕らは戦争に巻き込まれました
04:43
It was my mother with five little children.
母と 5人の子供
04:45
It takes her one year, through refugee camp after refugee camp,
難民キャンプから難民キャンプへと渡り歩き
04:48
to make her way to an airstrip where we can fly out of the country.
国外脱出できる飛行場へたどり着くまでに 1年かかりました
04:51
At every single refugee camp, she has to face off soldiers
すべての難民キャンプで 僕の9才の兄マークを
04:53
who want to take my elder brother Mark, who was nine,
連れ去って少年兵にしようとする兵士と
04:59
and make him a boy soldier.
彼女は対決しました
05:01
Can you imagine this five-foot-two woman,
想像できますか この1.5メートルの女性が
05:03
standing up to men with guns who want to kill us?
銃を持って僕らを殺そうとする男に立ち向かうのを?
05:05
All through that one year,
その一年間
05:09
my mother never cried one time, not once.
母は一度も泣きませんでした
05:11
But when we were in Lisbon, in the airport,
でも 僕らがリスボン空港で
05:14
about to fly to England,
イギリスへ飛ぼうとしていたとき
05:16
this woman saw my mother wearing this dress,
なんども洗濯され 透けて見えるほど
05:18
which had been washed so many times it was basically see through,
薄くなった洋服を着た母と
05:21
with five really hungry-looking kids,
5人のお腹を空かした子供をみた 女性が
05:25
came over and asked her what had happened.
何があったのか母の元に来て尋ねました
05:28
And she told this woman.
母がこの女性に話すと
05:30
And so this woman emptied out her suitcase
女性は スーツケースを空にして
05:31
and gave all of her clothes to my mother, and to us,
全ての洋服を母と僕らに与え
05:33
and the toys of her kids, who didn't like that very much, but --
彼女の子供のおもちゃも与え -- 彼らはそれを快く思わなかったけど --
05:36
(Laughter) --
(笑)
05:39
that was the only time she cried.
彼女が泣いたのはそのときだけでした
05:40
And I remember years later, I was writing about my mother,
数年後 僕は彼女に手紙を書きながら
05:43
and I asked her, "Why did you cry then?"
こう聞いたのを覚えています 「なぜ あの時 泣いたの?」
05:45
And she said, "You know, you can steel your heart
彼女は言いました「どんな困難や 恐ろしいことに対しても
05:47
against any kind of trouble, any kind of horror.
心を堅くすることはできるわ
05:50
But the simple act of kindness from a complete stranger
でも 身も知らずの人からの 純粋な親切行為は
05:53
will unstitch you."
あなたの心を解くものよ」
05:58
The old women in my father's village, after this war had happened,
この戦争のあと 私の父の村の老婦人達は
06:04
memorized the names of every dead person,
あらゆる死者の名前を暗記しました
06:08
and they would sing these dirges, made up of these names.
そして 彼らはこれらの名前を綴った哀歌を詠います
06:11
Dirges so melancholic that they would scorch you.
哀歌は あまりにも切なくあなたをこがすでしょう
06:18
And they would sing them only when they planted the rice,
そして まるで死者の心を稲に種つけるように
06:20
as though they were seeding the hearts of the dead
米を植える時にだけ 彼らはこの
06:24
into the rice.
哀歌を詠唱します
06:26
But when it came for harvest time,
そして 収穫の時には
06:28
they would sing these joyful songs,
その年に生まれた
06:30
that were made up of the names of every child
全ての子供の名前を綴った
06:32
who had been born that year.
楽しい歌を歌います
06:34
And then the next planting season, when they sang the dirge,
そして次の田植えの時に彼らが哀歌を歌うとき
06:37
they would remove as many names of the dead
生まれた人と同じだけの死んだ人の
06:41
that equaled as many people that were born.
名前をそこから省きます
06:44
And in this way, these women enacted a lot of transformation,
そして このようにして 女性達は 多くの変化をもたらしました
06:46
beautiful transformation.
美しい変化をです
06:52
Did you know, that before the genocide in Rwanda,
ルワンダの虐殺以前
06:54
the word for rape and the word for marriage
結婚という単語と 強姦という単語が
06:58
was the same one?
同じだったことをご存知ですか?
07:01
But today, women are rebuilding Rwanda.
でも 今日 ルワンダを再建しているのは女性達です
07:04
Did you also know that after apartheid,
また アパルトヘイトの後
07:08
when the new government went into the parliament houses,
新しい政府が国会議事堂に入ったとき
07:11
there were no female toilets in the building?
そこには女性のトイレがなかったことをご存知ですか?
07:13
Which would seem to suggest that apartheid
それはアパルトヘイトが完全に男性の
07:17
was entirely the business of men.
ビジネスであったことを示唆します
07:19
All of this to say, that despite the horror, and despite the death,
これは その恐怖や死にもかかわらず
07:22
women are never really counted.
女性がかつて数に入れられることがなかったことを物語ります
07:26
Their humanity never seems to matter very much to us.
彼女らの人間性は 僕らにとってはあまり重要ではなかったようです
07:29
When I was growing up in Nigeria --
私がナイジェリアで育ったとき --
07:34
and I shouldn't say Nigeria, because that's too general,
ナイジェリアと言うとあまりにも一般的で適当ではありませんが
07:37
but in Afikpo, the Igbo part of the country where I'm from --
僕の出身地 イボ族地域のウルホボでは
07:39
there were always rites of passage for young men.
青年のための通過儀礼が常にありました
07:42
Men were taught to be men in the ways in which we are not women,
男は 女でないことで 男であることを教えられる
07:45
that's essentially what it is.
基本的にはそういうことです
07:49
And a lot of rituals involved killing, killing little animals,
そして 儀式が進むに従って その多くは小動物を殺すことが含まれました
07:51
progressing along, so when I turned 13 --
そして 僕が13歳になったとき --
07:55
and, I mean, it made sense, it was an agrarian community,
つまり もっともなことですが そこは農村地帯なので
07:57
somebody had to kill the animals,
誰かが動物を殺さなければなりません
08:00
there was no Whole Foods you could go and get kangaroo steak at --
そこには カンガルーステーキを売っているような食料品店などありません
08:02
so when I turned 13, it was my turn now to kill a goat.
そして 僕が13歳になったとき ヤギを殺す順番が回ってきました
08:05
And I was this weird, sensitive kid, who couldn't really do it,
僕は 変わった 敏感な子供で こういうことが出来ませんでした
08:10
but I had to do it.
でも やらなければいけません
08:14
And I was supposed to do this alone.
本当は一人でるべきことでした
08:16
But a friend of mine, called Emmanuel,
でも 僕よりずっと年上で
08:18
who was significantly older than me,
ビアフラ内戦中に少年兵だった
08:20
who'd been a boy soldier during the Biafran war,
エマニュエルという友人の一人が
08:22
decided to come with me.
僕について来ることになり
08:24
Which sort of made me feel good,
僕はホッとしました
08:27
because he'd seen a lot of things.
彼が経験豊富だったからです
08:30
Now, when I was growing up, he used to tell me
それに僕が大きくなるとき 彼はよく
08:32
stories about how he used to bayonet people,
昔 銃剣で人を刺した話や 腸が飛び出しても
08:34
and their intestines would fall out, but they would keep running.
走りつづける人の話をしてくれました
08:36
So, this guy comes with me.
この男が僕と一緒に来るのです
08:39
And I don't know if you've ever heard a goat, or seen one --
皆さんは ヤギを見たり 鳴き声を聞いたことがありますか
08:42
they sound like human beings,
ヤギの鳴き声は人間のように聞こえます
08:45
that's why we call tragedies "a song of a goat."
だから僕らは悲劇を「山羊の唄」と言います
08:47
My friend Brad Kessler says that we didn't become human
僕の友人のブラッド・ケスラーは 僕らは山羊を飼うようになって
08:50
until we started keeping goats.
人間になった と言います
08:55
Anyway, a goat's eyes are like a child's eyes.
ヤギの目は子供の目のようです
08:57
So when I tried to kill this goat and I couldn't,
僕はヤギを殺そうとしますが出来なくて
09:02
Emmanuel bent down, he puts his hand over the mouth of the goat,
エマニュエルが屈み込んで 手で山羊の口をふさぎ
09:04
covers its eyes, so I don't have to look into them,
僕がヤギを殺す間 見なくてもいいように
09:09
while I kill the goat.
目を覆ってくれました
09:12
It didn't seem like a lot, for this guy who'd seen so much,
彼のように 沢山のものを見た人にとって
09:15
and to whom the killing of a goat must have seemed
ヤギを殺すことなんて
09:19
such a quotidian experience,
日常茶飯事のようなものでしょう
09:21
still found it in himself to try to protect me.
それでも 彼は私を守ろうという気持ちをなくしていませんでした
09:23
I was a wimp.
私は弱虫でした
09:29
I cried for a very long time.
長い時間 泣きました
09:31
And afterwards, he didn't say a word.
その後 彼は何も言わず
09:33
He just sat there watching me cry for an hour.
一時間ほど座って 私が泣くのをただ見ていました
09:35
And then afterwards he said to me,
その後 彼は言いました
09:37
"It will always be difficult, but if you cry like this every time,
いっつも 難しいけど 毎回そんなに泣いたら
09:39
you will die of heartbreak.
おまえ 悲しみで死んじまうぞ
09:44
Just know that it is enough sometimes
難しいと 解っているだけで
09:46
to know that it is difficult."
十分なときもあるんだよ
09:49
Of course, talking about goats makes me think of sheep,
もちろん 山羊のことを話すと羊のことを思い出します
09:54
and not in good ways.
良い意味じゃないですが
09:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:59
So, I was born two days after Christmas.
僕はクリスマスの2日後に生まれました
10:01
So growing up, you know, I had a cake and everything,
僕はいつもケーキやなにかでお祝いしてもらったけど
10:05
but I never got any presents, because, born two days after Christmas.
プレゼントはもらったことがありません なぜなら クリスマスの2日後に生まれたので
10:08
So, I was about nine, and my uncle had just come back from Germany,
僕が9歳になるとき 叔父がちょうどドイツから帰って来ていました
10:13
and we had the Catholic priest over,
家にはカトリックの聖職者が訪問中で
10:16
my mother was entertaining him with tea.
母がお茶でもてなしていました
10:19
And my uncle suddenly says, "Where are Chris' presents?"
叔父がいきなり言いました「クリスのプレゼントはどこだ?
10:21
And my mother said, "Don't talk about that in front of guests."
母は言いました「お客様の前で話すことではありません」
10:25
But he was desperate to show that he'd just come back,
でも 彼は自分がちょうど戻って来たということを誇示したくて
10:29
so he summoned me up, and he said,
僕を呼び出して 言いました
10:32
"Go into the bedroom, my bedroom.
「俺の寝室に行ってみろ
10:34
Take anything you want out of the suitcase.
スーツケースに入っているものから 好きなものを選んでいいぞ
10:36
It's your birthday present."
おまえの誕生プレゼントだ」
10:38
I'm sure he thought I'd take a book or a shirt,
僕が本かシャツを取ると思ったのでしょう
10:40
but I found an inflatable sheep.
しかし 僕はふくらます羊を見つけました
10:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:45
So, I blew it up and ran into the living room,
僕はそれをふくらませて 応接間に行きました
10:51
my finger where it shouldn't have been,
僕の指は あってはいけない場所にあり
10:53
I was waving this buzzing sheep around,
このブンブン言う羊を振り回しました
10:55
and my mother looked like she was going to die of shock.
母は今にもショック死 しそうに見えました
10:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:01
And Father McGetrick was completely unflustered,
マゲトリック神父は全く取り乱さず
11:04
just stirred his tea and looked at my mother and said,
ただ お茶をかき混ぜて 母をみてこう言いました
11:07
"It's all right Daphne, I'm Scottish."
「大丈夫だよ ダフネ 私はスコットランド人だから」
11:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:14
My last days in prison, the last 18 months,
僕の刑務所での最後の日々
11:28
my cellmate -- for the last year, the first year of the last 18 months --
最後の18ヶ月の最初の一年
11:34
my cellmate was 14 years old.
僕には14歳の同房者がいました
11:38
The name was John James,
彼の名前はジョン・ジェームス
11:41
and in those days, if a family member committed a crime,
その頃は もし家族の誰かが犯罪をおかすと
11:44
the military would hold you as ransom
家族が自首してくるまで
11:48
till your family turned themselves in.
軍隊はあなたを人質に取ります
11:51
So, here was this 14-year-old kid on death row.
この14歳の子供は死刑囚棟にいました
11:53
And not everybody on death row was a political prisoner.
死刑囚棟にいるのは 政治犯だけじゃなく
11:56
There were some really bad people there.
すごく悪い人たちもいます
11:58
And he had smuggled in two comics, two comic books --
彼は2冊の漫画雑誌をこっそり持ち込みました-
12:01
"Spiderman" and "X-Men."
スパイダーマンと X-メンです
12:04
He was obsessed.
彼は夢中になっていました
12:06
And when he got tired of reading them,
そして読むのに飽きた頃
12:07
he started to teach the men in death row how to read,
この漫画雑誌を使って 死刑囚棟の男達に
12:09
with these comic books.
読み方を教え始めました
12:13
And so, I remember night after night,
そして毎晩
12:15
you'd hear all these men, these really hardened criminals,
これら男達みんな この札付きの犯罪者達が
12:19
huddled around John James, reciting, "Take that, Spidey!"
ジョン・ジェームズの周りを取り囲み 「これでもくらえ スパイディー!」と朗読します
12:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:26
It's incredible.
驚くべきことです
12:28
I was really worried.
僕はすごく心配でした
12:31
He didn't know what death row meant.
彼は死刑囚棟の意味がわかっていませんでした
12:33
I'd been there twice,
僕はそこに二回入り
12:35
and I was terribly afraid that I was going to die.
死ぬことを大変恐れていました
12:37
And he would always laugh, and say,
でも彼は笑ってこう言います
12:39
"Come on, man, we'll make it out."
「大丈夫だよ 僕らは出れるよ」
12:41
Then I'd say, "How do you know?"
僕が「なんでわかるんだ?」と言うと
12:43
And he said, "Oh, I heard it on the grapevine."
彼は「噂で聞いた」と言いました
12:45
They killed him.
彼は殺されました
12:49
They handcuffed him to a chair,
彼は椅子に手錠でつながれ
12:51
and they tacked his penis to a table with a six-inch nail,
6インチ(15cm)の釘でペニスを机に打ちつけられ
12:54
then left him there to bleed to death.
失血で死ぬまでそこの放置されました
13:00
That's how I ended up in solitary, because I let my feelings be known.
僕は自分の感情を周りに解らせ あとは孤独に過ごしました
13:03
All around us, everywhere, there are people like this.
我々の回りすべてに 至る所に こういう人がいます
13:12
The Igbo used to say that they built their own gods.
イボ族は 彼らが神を造ったと言ったものです
13:17
They would come together as a community,
彼らは 群集として一緒に来て
13:23
and they would express a wish.
そして願望を表明します
13:25
And their wish would then be brought to a priest,
そして 彼らの願望は 儀式物を見つける
13:28
who would find a ritual object,
聖職者のところに集められ
13:30
and the appropriate sacrifices would be made,
適当な犠牲が払われ
13:33
and the shrine would be built for the god.
そして 神の為の神社が建設されます
13:35
But if the god became unruly and began to ask for human sacrifice,
しかし 神が手に負えなくなり 人間の生贄を求め始めたら
13:38
the Igbos would destroy the god.
イボ族は神を滅ぼします
13:43
They would knock down the shrine,
彼らは 神社を取り壊し
13:45
and they would stop saying the god's name.
神の名前を呼ぶことを止めます
13:48
This is how they came to reclaim their humanity.
こうして 彼らは人間性を取り戻しました
13:50
Every day, all of us here,
ここにいる僕達は皆 毎日
13:55
we're building gods that have gone rampant,
凶暴になった神々を奉っています
13:57
and it's time we started knocking them down
僕らはそれらを倒す時にきています
14:00
and forgetting their names.
そして 彼らの名前を忘れること
14:03
It doesn't require a tremendous thing.
並外れたことなど必要ではなく
14:06
All it requires is to recognize among us, every day --
必要なのは 日々僕らの間で認識するだけです
14:09
the few of us that can see -- are surrounded by people
僕らの中でも少数の見ることが出来る人は
14:13
like the ones I've told you.
私があなたに話したような人々に取り囲まれています
14:16
There are some of you in this room, amazing people,
この部屋に居る 何人かの 素晴らしい人々は
14:19
who offer all of us the mirror to our own humanity.
僕らに 僕ら自身の人間性の鏡を提供します
14:22
I want to end with a poem by an American poet called Lucille Clifton.
ルシール・クリフトンというアメリカの詩人の詩で終わりたいと思います
14:28
The poem is called "Libation," and it's for my friend Vusi
「献酒」という詩で 聴衆のどこかにいる
14:33
who is in the audience here somewhere.
友人 Vusi に捧げます
14:38
"Libation,
「献酒」
14:42
North Carolina, 1999.
ノースカロライナ 1999
14:44
I offer to this ground, this gin.
「この地面に このジンを捧げよう
14:47
I imagine an old man crying here,
ここで泣いている老人を想像し
14:54
out of the sight of the overseer.
監督官の見えないところで
14:57
He pushes his tongue through a hole
彼が完全であったなら
15:01
where his tooth would be, if he were whole.
歯があったはずの穴に舌を押し通し
15:04
It aches in that space where his tooth would be,
その疼く空き場所にはかつて 歯があったであろう
15:09
where his land would be,
土地があったであろう
15:13
his house, his wife, his son, his beautiful daughter.
彼の家 彼の妻 息子 美しい娘 がいたはずの場所
15:16
He wipes sorrow from his face,
彼は悲しみを彼の顔から拭き取って
15:22
and puts his thirsty finger to his thirsty tongue,
彼の乾いた指を 乾いた舌に当て
15:27
and tastes the salt.
塩を味わう
15:31
I call a name that could be his.
私は彼のものでありえた名前を呼びます
15:37
This is for you, old man.
これはあなたに捧げよう ご老人
15:39
This gin, this salty earth."
このジン この塩辛い地球」
15:44
Thank you.
ありがとう
15:48
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:50
Translated by Kayo Mizutani
Reviewed by Keisuke Kusunoki

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Chris Abani - Novelist, poet
Imprisoned three times by the Nigerian government, Chris Abani turned his experience into poems that Harold Pinter called "the most naked, harrowing expression of prison life and political torture imaginable." His novels include GraceLand (2004) and The Virgin of Flames (2007).

Why you should listen

Chris Abani's first novel, published when he was 16, was Masters of the Board, a political thriller about a foiled Nigerian coup. The story was convincing enough that the Nigerian government threw him in jail for inciting a coincidentally timed real-life coup. Imprisoned and tortured twice more, he channeled the experience into searing poetry.

Abani's best-selling 2004 novel GraceLand is a searing and funny tale of a young Nigerian boy, an Elvis impersonator who moves through the wide, wild world of Lagos, slipping between pop and traditional cultures, art and crime. It's a perennial book-club pick, a story that brings the postcolonial African experience to vivid life.

Now based in Los Angeles, Abani published The Virgin of Flames in 2007. He is also a publisher, running the poetry imprint Black Goat Press.

More profile about the speaker
Chris Abani | Speaker | TED.com