English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2004

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: Flow, the secret to happiness

ミハイ・チクセントミハイ: フローについて

Filmed
Views 4,127,482

ミハイ・チクセントミハイは問いかけます「人生を生きるに値するものにするものは何でしょう」お金では幸せになれないと気付いた彼は、「フロー」の状態をもたらす活動の中から喜びと永続的な満足を見出している人たちを研究しました。

- Positive psychologist
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi has contributed pioneering work to our understanding of happiness, creativity, human fulfillment and the notion of "flow" -- a state of heightened focus and immersion in activities such as art, play and work. Full bio

I grew up in Europe, and World War II caught me
私はヨーロッパで育ち第二次世界大戦のとき
00:12
when I was between seven and 10 years old.
7歳から10歳でした
00:17
And I realized how few of the grown-ups that I knew
私の知っていた大人でこの戦争による悲劇を
00:21
were able to withstand the tragedies that the war visited on them --
耐えることのできた人はわずかでした
00:28
how few of them could even resemble a normal, contented,
戦争で仕事や家などの拠り所を失ってしまって
00:38
satisfied, happy life once their job, their home, their security
平穏無事に 満ち足りて幸せな生活すら
00:46
was destroyed by the war.
維持できない人が多いことを目の当たりにしていました
00:55
So I became interested in understanding
そこで何が人生を生きるに価するものとするか
00:57
what contributed to a life that was worth living.
ということに興味を持つようになりました
01:00
And I tried, as a child, as a teenager, to read philosophy
ティーンエイジャーの若者ながら哲学書を読み
01:05
and to get involved in art and religion and many other ways
芸術と信仰や多くのことに関わって
01:11
that I could see as a possible answer to that question.
この問いの答えを探し求めました
01:19
And finally I ended up encountering psychology by chance.
そんな中 心理学との偶然の出会いがありました
01:23
I was at a ski resort in Switzerland without any money
私はスイスのスキーリゾートに居ましたが 遊ぶお金はありませんでした
01:32
to actually enjoy myself, because the snow had melted and
雪も融けてしまったのに
01:37
I didn't have money to go to a movie. But I found that on the --
映画を見に行くお金も持っていなかったのですが --
01:45
I read in the newspapers that there was to be a presentation
チューリッヒの街中で
01:50
by someone in a place that I'd seen in the center of Zurich,
講演会をするという新聞記事を見ました
01:55
and it was about flying saucers [that] he was going to talk.
空飛ぶ円盤について話すということでした
02:01
And I thought, well, since I can't go to the movies,
私は まぁ映画にも行けないのだから
02:07
at least I will go for free to listen to flying saucers.
無料なら空飛ぶ円盤の話を聞いてみようかと考えました
02:09
And the man who talked at that evening lecture was very interesting.
その晩講演した男はとても興味深い人でした
02:15
Instead of talking about little green men,
小さな緑の宇宙人の話の代わりに
02:24
he talked about how the psyche of the Europeans
彼は ヨーロッパ人の精神がいかに
02:27
had been traumatized by the war, and now they're projecting
戦争で傷ついたかを述べました
02:32
flying saucers into the sky.
空飛ぶ円盤を空に見出すことで
02:36
He talked about how the mandalas of ancient Hindu religion
古代ヒンズー教の曼荼羅にあたるものを
02:40
were kind of projected into the sky as an attempt to regain
空に映し出すことで それは戦争後の混乱の中から
02:45
some sense of order after the chaos of war.
何かの秩序を取り戻そうという試みだと 語りました
02:52
And this seemed very interesting to me.
私はこれをとても面白いと思いました
02:56
And I started reading his books after that lecture.
この講演を聞いてから 彼の本を読み始めました
02:59
And that was Carl Jung, whose name or work I had no idea about.
カールユングがその人でしたが それまでは名前も成果も知らなかったのでした
03:02
Then I came to this country to study psychology
やがて私はアメリカに渡って心理学を学ぶことになりました
03:10
and I started trying to understand the roots of happiness.
そうして幸せの根本は何かを理解しようという試みに着手しました
03:13
This is a typical result that many people have presented,
このグラフは 多くの人が説明してきたものです
03:20
and there are many variations on it.
多くのバリエーションがあります
03:25
But this, for instance, shows that about 30 percent of the people
この 1956 年にアメリカで行われた調査では
03:28
surveyed in the United States since 1956
30%の人が
03:32
say that their life is very happy.
人生が非常に幸せだと答えています
03:36
And that hasn't changed at all.
その数字はそこから全く変化しません
03:40
Whereas the personal income,
個人の収入は
03:42
on a scale that has been held constant to accommodate for inflation,
インフレを考慮した尺度で見ると
03:44
has more than doubled, almost tripled, in that period.
この期間に2倍以上 ほぼ3倍にに向上しましたが
03:50
But you find essentially the same results,
それでも幸せについては同じ結果になっています
03:54
namely, that after a certain basic point -- which corresponds more or less
貧困線よりも数千ドル多い程度の
03:58
to just a few 1,000 dollars above the minimum poverty level --
ある基準を超えてしまえば
04:03
increases in material well-being don't seem to affect how happy people are.
物質的な充足は人の幸福とは関係しないようです
04:07
In fact, you can find that the lack of basic resources,
基本的な物資 物的な財産が不足すると
04:14
material resources, contributes to unhappiness,
不幸に結びつきますが
04:21
but the increase in material resources does not increase happiness.
逆に物的な財産が増えても 幸福は増大しません
04:24
So my research has been focused more on --
以上のように実際の自分の経験に即した物事を見出だしたことを踏まえて
04:30
after finding out these things that actually corresponded
私の研究はもっと焦点を絞り
04:35
to my own experience, I tried to understand:
日々の暮らしの中 通常の経験の中のいったいどこで
04:42
where -- in everyday life, in our normal experience --
我々は本当に幸福を感じるのか
04:45
do we feel really happy?
ということを調べています
04:51
And to start
40年前にこの研究を始めるにあたり
04:54
those studies about 40 years ago, I began to look at creative people --
創造的な人たちに注目しました
04:58
first artists and scientists, and so forth -- trying to understand
芸術家や科学者などが
05:03
what made them feel that it was worth essentially spending their life
何をもってその人生を費やすに値すると考えるのか
05:09
doing things for which many of them didn't expect either fame or fortune,
彼らの多くはそのことから名声も富も期待できなくても
05:19
but which made their life meaningful and worth doing.
それでも人生に意味と取り組む価値を与える それは何か
05:25
This was one of the leading composers of American music back in the '70s.
この人は70年代のアメリカ音楽の著名な作曲家の一人です
05:30
And the interview was 40 pages long.
インタビューは40ページにも渡りますが
05:36
But this little excerpt is a very good summary
この短い抜粋には 彼がインタビューで言っていた内容が
05:39
of what he was saying during the interview.
よくまとまっています
05:43
And it describes how he feels when composing is going well.
作曲が上手く行っているときに彼がどう感じるか説明してあります
05:47
And he says by describing it as an ecstatic state.
彼はそのことを忘我の状態と表現しています
05:52
Now, "ecstasy" in Greek meant
ギリシャ語の忘我(エクスタシー)は
05:56
simply to stand to the side of something.
何かの横に立つという意味です
05:58
And then it became essentially an analogy for a mental state
その状態になると日常の決まった作業をしているとは感じられないような
06:01
where you feel that you are not doing your ordinary everyday routines.
精神状態を表すたとえとして使われるようになりました
06:08
So ecstasy is essentially a stepping into an alternative reality.
忘我とは本質的には 異なる世界の現実に足を踏み入れることです
06:14
And it's interesting, if you think about it, how, when we think about
それは興味深いことです 考えてみれば
06:20
the civilizations that we look up to as having been pinnacles of human achievement --
時代の頂点となった人類の偉業について
06:25
whether it's China, Greece, the Hindu civilization,
中国であれギリシャであれヒンズー文明であれ
06:31
or the Mayas, or Egyptians -- what we know about them
マヤ文明 エジプト これらの文明について知られていることは
06:36
is really about their ecstasies, not about their everyday life.
彼らの忘我の世界についてであり 日常生活についてありません
06:41
We know the temples they built, where people could come
我々は 彼らの建てた寺院について知っています
06:46
to experience a different reality.
寺院とは 日常とは別の現実を経験するために訪れるところです
06:49
We know about the circuses,
円形競技場をご存知でしょう
06:51
the arenas, the theaters.
アリーナや劇場
06:54
These are the remains of civilizations and they are the places that people went
これらは古代文明の名残ともいえるものです
06:57
to experience life in a more concentrated, more ordered form.
人々は濃密で秩序立てた人生を味わうために訪れます
07:05
Now, this man doesn't need to go to a place like this,
この作曲家はそんな場所に行く必要はありません
07:14
which is also -- this place, this arena, which is built
この場所 ここのアリーナもまた
07:18
like a Greek amphitheatre, is a place for ecstasy also.
ギリシャの円形劇場のように忘我の状態のための場所です
07:22
We are participating in a reality that is different
毎日慣れ親しんだ人生とは異なる
07:26
from that of the everyday life that we're used to.
別の現実に皆さんは参加しておられます
07:30
But this man doesn't need to go there.
しかしこの作曲家はそこに行く必要はありません
07:33
He needs just a piece of paper where he can put down little marks,
小さな楽譜を書き込むための紙だけが必要なのです
07:36
and as he does that, he can imagine sounds
作曲をしていると これまで存在したことのない音の組み合わせを
07:42
that had not existed before in that particular combination.
想像することができるというのです
07:48
So once he gets to that point of beginning to create,
そこで -- ジェニファーが即興演奏したときのように --
07:52
like Jennifer did in her improvisation,
新しい現実を作り出す状況に到達すること
07:58
a new reality -- that is, a moment of ecstasy --
これが忘我のひとときです
08:01
he enters that different reality.
彼は別の現実に入り込むのです
08:06
Now he says also that this is so intense an experience
彼は言います これは非常に強烈な経験で
08:09
that it feels almost as if he didn't exist.
あたかも自分は存在しないかのように感じます
08:13
And that sounds like a kind of a romantic exaggeration.
誇張した絵空事のように聞こえるかもしれません
08:16
But actually, our nervous system is incapable of processing
ところが実際 ヒトの神経系は毎秒 110 ビット以上の情報を
08:22
more than about 110 bits of information per second.
処理することはできません
08:26
And in order to hear me and understand what I'm saying,
私の話を聞いてそれを理解するには
08:31
you need to process about 60 bits per second.
およそ毎秒60ビットを処理しなければなりません
08:35
That's why you can't hear more than two people.
それだから三人以上の話を聞く事はできず
08:39
You can't understand more than two people talking to you.
三人以上の人が話しかけても理解できないのです
08:42
Well, when you are really involved in this completely engaging process
さてあなたがこの完全に没頭してしまうプロセスの中にあり
08:45
of creating something new, as this man is,
この人と同様に何か新しいものを作っているとしたら
08:56
he doesn't have enough attention left over to monitor
体の感覚や 家庭での問題を気にする分の
08:59
how his body feels, or his problems at home.
注意力は残っていません
09:05
He can't feel even that he's hungry or tired.
空腹や疲れさえも感じません
09:09
His body disappears,
彼の意識からは体も
09:12
his identity disappears from his consciousness,
自分が誰かということも消えてしまいます
09:15
because he doesn't have enough attention, like none of us do,
なぜかというと 集中して取り組むべき何かを
09:20
to really do well something that requires a lot of concentration,
うまくやり遂げながら 同時に自分の存在を感じるほどの
09:24
and at the same time to feel that he exists.
注意力は残っていないのです だれでもそうなります
09:30
So existence is temporarily suspended.
そこでは人の存在はしばらく忘れられています
09:32
And he says that his hand seems to be moving by itself.
彼は自分の手が勝手に動いているようだと言います
09:37
Now, I could look at my hand for two weeks, and I wouldn't feel
でも 私は作曲ができないので 自分の手を2週間見続けたとしても
09:43
any awe or wonder, because I can't compose. (Laughter)
畏怖も驚きも感じることはないでしょう
09:51
So what it's telling you here
そのことは何を意味するのか
09:55
is that obviously this automatic,
インタビューのほかの部分にも記された 自動的
09:57
spontaneous process that he's describing can only happen to someone
自発的な過程は よく訓練されて技術を身につけた
10:04
who is very well trained and who has developed technique.
人にだけ起きるのです
10:09
And it has become a kind of a truism in the study of creativity
そして創造性の研究の中でこんなことが明らかになっています
10:13
that you can't be creating anything with less than 10 years
10年間 特定分野の技術的知識に深く関わることがなければ
10:20
of technical-knowledge immersion in a particular field.
何か創造的になるなどという事はありません
10:25
Whether it's mathematics or music, it takes that long
数学でも音楽であっても 先行するものよりも
10:31
to be able to begin to change something in a way that it's better
どこかに優位性のある物を作り出せるようになるには
10:36
than what was there before.
それだけの時間はかかります
10:44
Now, when that happens,
さてその状態が生じると
10:47
he says the music just flows out.
音楽が自然に湧き出てくると彼は言います
10:49
And because all of these people I started interviewing --
私がインタビューを始めたときにお願いした人たちは全て
10:51
this was an interview which is over 30 years old --
-- インタビューは30年ほど前のものですが --
10:55
so many of the people described this as a spontaneous flow
実に多くの人がこんな状態を自発的な流れと説明します
11:01
that I called this type of experience the "flow experience."
そこで私はこの種の経験をフロー体験と呼ぶことにしました
11:05
And it happens in different realms.
これは様々な領域で生じます
11:10
For instance, a poet describes it in this form.
たとえば詩人はこんな風に表現します
11:13
This is by a student of mine who interviewed
この調査は私の生徒が行ったもので
11:17
some of the leading writers and poets in the United States.
米国の主要な作家や詩人の中から何人かにインタビューをしました
11:20
And it describes the same effortless, spontaneous feeling
同じように この忘我の状態に入ると
11:23
that you get when you enter into this ecstatic state.
無理なく自然な感覚に到達するというのです
11:29
This poet describes it as opening a door that floats in the sky --
詩人はドアを開けると空中に浮かび上がっていくような感じ と説明します
11:32
a very similar description to what Albert Einstein gave
これはアルバート アインシュタインが
11:37
as to how he imagined the forces of relativity,
相対性の力がどう働くかを理解しようと苦労していたときに
11:40
when he was struggling with trying to understand how it worked.
どうやって着想を得たかという説明とよく似ています
11:46
But it happens in other activities.
でも他の活動においても生じるものなのです
11:50
For instance, this is another student of mine,
これは別の生徒 オーストラリア出身の
11:55
Susan Jackson from Australia, who did work
スーザンジャクソンが
11:57
with some of the leading athletes in the world.
世界の有力なスポーツ選手を研究しました
12:01
And you see here in this description of an Olympic skater,
オリンピックのスケート選手の描写です
12:05
the same essential description of the phenomenology
選手の内面の状態について
12:09
of the inner state of the person.
同じことを描写しています
12:12
You don't think; it goes automatically,
あなた自身が音楽と一体になるようなことが
12:14
if you merge yourself with the music, and so forth.
自然に起きるとは思われないかもしれません
12:17
It happens also, actually, in the most recent book I wrote,
また いちばん最近に書いた本「グッドビジネス」の中で
12:21
called "Good Business," where I interviewed some of the CEOs
私は何人かのCEOたちにインタビューをしました
12:25
who had been nominated by their peers as being both very successful
これらの人々は同業者たちから非常に優秀で
12:28
and very ethical, very socially responsible.
倫理に優れ 社会責任を担っているとして推薦された人たちです
12:33
You see that these people define success
この方たちにとって成功とは自分の仕事の中で
12:36
as something that helps others and at the same time
他の人を助けながら同時に
12:40
makes you feel happy as you are working at it.
自分も幸せになることと定義されているのがわかりました
12:45
And like all of these successful and responsible CEOs say,
そしてこれらの成功して責任ある CEO の人たちが言うように
12:48
you can't have just one of these things be successful
その中から一部分だけに成功するということはないのです
12:55
if you want a meaningful and successful job.
有意義で成功する仕事を望んでいるのであれば --
13:02
Anita Roddick is another one of these CEOs we interviewed.
アニタ ロディックもまたインタビューを受けたCEOのひとりです
13:05
She is the founder of Body Shop,
化粧品 中でも自然派化粧品の雄である
13:10
the natural cosmetics king.
ボディ ショップの創始者です
13:14
It's kind of a passion that comes
彼女の情熱は仕事中にベストを尽くして
13:16
from doing the best and having flow while you're working.
フローの状態に至っていることから得られるものです
13:18
This is an interesting little quote from Masaru Ibuka,
これは ソニーの創始者である井深 大の味わい深い一言です
13:22
who was at that time starting out Sony without any money,
彼はそのときソニーを始めたばかりでお金もなく
13:26
without a product -- they didn't have a product,
製品もなく --製品がなかったのです
13:31
they didn't have anything, but they had an idea.
何もない状態でしたが アイデアがありました
13:33
And the idea he had was to establish a place of work where engineers
彼のアイデアというのは エンジニアが技術革新の喜びを感じられて
13:36
can feel the joy of technological innovation,
社会に対する使命を意識して心ゆくまで仕事に打ち込める
13:41
be aware of their mission to society and work to their heart's content.
仕事場を作り上げるというものでした
13:45
I couldn't improve on this as a good example
「フロー」が職場でどう実現されるのか
13:50
of how flow enters the workplace.
これ以上よい例を思いつきません
13:54
Now, when we do studies --
我々の研究ではこれまでに
13:57
we have, with other colleagues around the world,
すでに世界中の研究者たちと8000回以上の
14:00
done over 8,000 interviews of people -- from Dominican monks,
-- ドミニカの僧侶や盲目の修道女
14:04
to blind nuns, to Himalayan climbers, to Navajo shepherds --
ヒマラヤの登山家 ナバホの羊飼いにも -- インタビューを行いました
14:09
who enjoy their work.
彼らはみな自分の仕事を楽しんでいます
14:16
And regardless of the culture,
そして文化によらず
14:18
regardless of education or whatever, there are these seven conditions
教育にもよらず 人がフローに入るときの条件として
14:20
that seem to be there when a person is in flow.
7つの条件があると考えています
14:27
There's this focus that, once it becomes intense,
このポイントが十分強まると忘我の感覚
14:31
leads to a sense of ecstasy, a sense of clarity:
明晰な感覚に到達するのです それは
14:35
you know exactly what you want to do from one moment to the other;
時間の経過と共に常に自分が何をしたいのか分かっていて
14:39
you get immediate feedback.
ただちにフィードバックが得られること
14:42
You know that what you need to do
何をする必要があるか分かっていて
14:44
is possible to do, even though difficult,
それが難しくても 可能なことで
14:46
and sense of time disappears, you forget yourself,
時間の感覚が消失すること 自分自身のことを忘れてしまうこと
14:49
you feel part of something larger.
自分はもっと大きな何かの一部であると感じること
14:52
And once the conditions are present,
これらの条件が満たされるなら
14:55
what you are doing becomes worth doing for its own sake.
あなたがしていることはそれ自体で価値のあることになります
14:58
In our studies, we represent the everyday life of people in this simple scheme.
我々の研究では この簡単な図で人々の毎日の生活を記述できます
15:03
And we can measure this very precisely, actually,
そして実際にとても正確にこれを測れるのです
15:09
because we give people electronic pagers that go off 10 times a day,
参加者に1日十回鳴るポケットベルを配布して
15:13
and whenever they go off you say what you're doing, how you feel,
それが鳴るたびに 何をしているか どんな気分か
15:17
where you are, what you're thinking about.
どこにいるか 何を考えているかを記録してもらいます
15:22
And two things that we measure is the amount of challenge
2 つのことを計測します それはその瞬間に経験していることの挑戦の度合いと
15:24
people experience at that moment and the amount of skill
その瞬間に適用している技術が
15:27
that they feel they have at that moment.
どの程度のものかということです
15:31
So for each person we can establish an average,
それぞれの人について平均をとって
15:34
which is the center of the diagram.
この図の中心点にします
15:37
That would be your mean level of challenge and skill,
その人の平均的なチャレンジとスキルのレベルで
15:40
which will be different from that of anybody else.
他の人のものとは違っているはずです
15:43
But you have a kind of a set point there, which would be in the middle.
ともかく こうして選ばれた平均値を図の中心にします
15:46
If we know what that set point is,
中心点のレベルがわかっていれば
15:51
we can predict fairly accurately when you will be in flow,
かなり正確に どんなときにフロー状態に入るか予想できるようになります
15:53
and it will be when your challenges are higher than average
つまりチャレンジが平均よりも困難で
15:58
and skills are higher than average.
スキルも平均以上のものが求められているときです
16:01
And you may be doing things very differently from other people,
あなたは他の人とは非常に異なるやり方で仕事をしているかもしれませんが
16:03
but for everyone that flow channel, that area there,
このフローの入り口は誰にもあり
16:07
will be when you are doing what you really like to do --
自分の本当に望むことを行っているときには そこに存在しています
16:11
play the piano, be with your best friend, perhaps work,
ピアノを弾くことや最高の友達との時間
16:15
if work is what provides flow for you.
もし仕事があなたにフローをもたらしてくれるものなのなら 仕事の時間にも
16:21
And then the other areas become less and less positive.
さて他の領域は次第に好ましくなくなります
16:25
Arousal is still good because you are over-challenged there.
覚醒の領域では困難に挑んでいるのでこれはよいものです
16:29
Your skills are not quite as high as they should be,
あなたの技術は求められるものほど高くないのですが
16:34
but you can move into flow fairly easily
技術をもう少し高めることで
16:36
by just developing a little more skill.
かなり容易にフローに入ることができます
16:39
So, arousal is the area where most people learn from,
覚醒の領域からはほとんどの人が学べるでしょう
16:42
because that's where they're pushed beyond their comfort zone
ここは彼らが快適な範囲外に押し出されており
16:46
and to enter that -- going back to flow --
フローの領域に戻ろうとして 人はもっと高度な
16:52
then they develop higher skills.
技術を身に着けます
16:55
Control is also a good place to be,
制御の領域も良いところです
16:57
because there you feel comfortable, but not very excited.
ここでも人は快適です ただあまり刺激はありません
17:01
It's not very challenging any more.
チャレンジというにはあまりに容易なのです
17:05
And if you want to enter flow from control,
制御からフローに入りたければ
17:08
you have to increase the challenges.
チャレンジの度合いを高めなければなりません
17:10
So those two are ideal and complementary areas
これらの2つは望ましく そしてお互いに補い合う領域で
17:13
from which flow is easy to go into.
フローへとたやすく移動できます
17:17
The other combinations of challenge and skill
その他のチャレンジとスキルの組み合わせに移ると
17:21
become progressively less optimal.
次第に望ましいものでなくなります
17:24
Relaxation is fine -- you still feel OK.
弛緩も悪くない 気分はよいです
17:27
Boredom begins to be very aversive
退屈は避けたいものです
17:29
and apathy becomes very negative:
無気力は非常に否定的です
17:34
you don't feel that you're doing anything,
何かをしようという気がなくなります
17:38
you don't use your skills, there's no challenge.
スキルを使わず チャレンジもしません
17:42
Unfortunately, a lot of people's experience is in apathy.
不幸なことに多くの人の経験はこの無気力の領域にあります
17:44
The largest single contributor to that experience
テレビの視聴がこの経験に寄与するところは大で
17:49
is watching television; the next one is being in the bathroom, sitting.
その次はトイレで座っているとき
17:56
Even though sometimes watching television
時にはテレビを見ているときでもその7-8%の時間は
18:02
about seven to eight percent of the time is in flow,
フローに入っているかもしれません
18:08
but that's when you choose a program you really want to watch
それは本当に見たい番組のときです
18:12
and you get feedback from it.
そこから得るものがあるときです
18:15
So the question we are trying to address -- and I'm way over time --
答えるべき質問は --もう時間ですね--
18:18
is how to put more and more of everyday life in that flow channel.
毎日の生活の中で どうすればより多くの時間をフローの状態にできるか
18:24
And that is the kind of challenge that we're trying to understand.
これを理解しようと私たちも努力しているのです
18:30
And some of you obviously know how to do that spontaneously
皆さんの中にはアドバイスがなくても 自分でやり方を分かっている方もいるでしょう
18:35
without any advice, but unfortunately a lot of people don't.
しかし不幸なことに多くの人は分かっていません
18:38
And that's what our mandate is, in a way, to do.
それに対して我々の研究がひとつのやり方になるのです
18:42
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
18:48
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:49
Translated by Natsuhiko Mizutani
Reviewed by Keisuke Kusunoki

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Positive psychologist
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi has contributed pioneering work to our understanding of happiness, creativity, human fulfillment and the notion of "flow" -- a state of heightened focus and immersion in activities such as art, play and work.

Why you should listen

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi says creativity is a central source of meaning in our lives. A leading researcher in positive psychology, he has devoted his life to studying what makes people truly happy: "When we are involved in [creativity], we feel that we are living more fully than during the rest of life." He is the architect of the notion of "flow" -- the creative moment when a person is completely involved in an activity for its own sake.

Csikszentmihalyi teaches psychology and management at Claremont Graduate University, focusing on human strengths such as optimism, motivation and responsibility. He's the director the Quality of Life Research Center there. He has written numerous books and papers about the search for joy and fulfillment.

More profile about the speaker
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi | Speaker | TED.com