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TEDGlobal 2005

Carl Honoré: In praise of slowness

カール・オノレイ: 「スロ-」の勧め

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ジャーナリストのカール・オノレイは西欧のスピード偏重が、健康や生産性、生活の質へ悪影響を与えていると考えています。一方で、スローダウンする風潮が次第に醸成されつつあることを指摘します。

- Journalist
In his book In Praise of Slowness, Carl Honoré dissects our speed-obsessed society and celebrates those who have gotten in touch with their "inner tortoise." Full bio

What I'd like to start off with is an observation,
昨年1年間を通じて
00:26
which is that if I've learned anything over the last year,
学んだことが事があります
00:28
it's that the supreme irony
とても皮肉なことですが
00:30
of publishing a book about slowness
「スロー」に関する本を出版すると
00:32
is that you have to go around promoting it really fast.
宣伝活動で「忙しく」なります
00:34
I seem to spend most of my time these days
最近では
00:37
zipping from city to city, studio to studio,
各所の都市の放送局で
00:39
interview to interview,
インタビューを受け
00:42
serving up the book in really tiny bite-size chunks.
本の内容を要約してお伝えしています
00:44
Because everyone these days
すべての人達が
00:46
wants to know how to slow down,
どうやってスローダウンするか
00:48
but they want to know how to slow down really quickly. So ...
急いで学びたがっているからです
00:50
so I did a spot on CNN the other day
CNNでは出演時間よりも
00:53
where I actually spent more time in makeup than I did talking on air.
メークの方が時間がかかりました
00:55
And I think that -- that's not really surprising though, is it?
これが現実ですから
00:59
Because that's kind of the world that we live in now,
当然ですよね
01:01
a world stuck in fast-forward.
スピードに縛られ
01:03
A world obsessed with speed,
強迫観念のように
01:06
with doing everything faster, with cramming more and more
限られた時間で詰め込む
01:08
into less and less time.
風潮があります
01:11
Every moment of the day feels like
生活のすべてが
01:13
a race against the clock.
時間との勝負です
01:15
To borrow a phrase from Carrie Fisher, which is
本にも記載しましたが
01:17
in my bio there; I'll just toss it out again --
キャリー・フィッシャーはこう言っています
01:19
"These days even instant gratification takes too long." (Laughter)
即席の楽しみでさえ時間がかかりすぎだと(笑い)
01:21
And
我々は
01:24
if you think about how we to try to make things better, what do we do?
何かを改善しようとすると
01:26
No, we speed them up, don't we? So we used to dial; now we speed dial.
スピードをあげるという方法をとります
01:28
We used to read; now we speed read. We used to walk; now we speed walk.
速く電話する 速く読む 速く歩く
01:31
And of course, we used to date and now we speed date.
デートでさえ 速くデートする風潮があります
01:34
And even things that are by their very nature slow --
元来 スローがコンセプトのものでさえ
01:37
we try and speed them up too.
速くする傾向にあります
01:40
So I was in New York recently, and I walked past a gym
NYでスポーツクラブの前を通ったとき
01:43
that had an advertisement in the window for a new course, a new evening course.
新しいコースが宣伝されていました
01:45
And it was for, you guessed it, speed yoga.
それはスピードヨガです
01:48
So this -- the perfect solution for time-starved professionals
忙しい人にはぴったりです
01:51
who want to, you know, salute the sun,
ヨガはしたいけど
01:54
but only want to give over about 20 minutes to it.
20分ぐらいでという人です
01:56
I mean, these are sort of the extreme examples,
これらの極端な例は
01:59
and they're amusing and good to laugh at.
冗談として笑えますが
02:01
But there's a very serious point,
気をつけなければならないのは
02:03
and I think that in the headlong dash of daily life,
スピードを重視する日常に潜んでいます
02:05
we often lose sight of the damage
速さ優先の生活スタイルがもたらす
02:08
that this roadrunner form of living does to us.
害を見落としがちです
02:11
We're so marinated in the culture of speed
速さの文化にどっぷりつかり
02:14
that we almost fail to notice the toll it takes
引き換えの代償に気付きません
02:17
on every aspect of our lives --
日常のあらゆる側面
02:19
on our health, our diet, our work,
健康 食事 仕事 人間関係
02:21
our relationships, the environment and our community.
環境 そして 社会における代償です
02:23
And sometimes it takes
それは時として
02:26
a wake-up call, doesn't it,
豊かな生活をせず
02:28
to alert us to the fact that we're hurrying through our lives,
生き急いでいる私たちへの
02:30
instead of actually living them; that we're
警告となって
02:33
living the fast life, instead of the good life.
現れます
02:35
And I think for many people, that wake-up call
これはしばしば
02:37
takes the form of an illness.
病気として表面化します
02:39
You know, a burnout, or eventually the body says,
燃え尽き症候群や
02:41
"I can't take it anymore," and throws in the towel.
体の拒否反応 もしくは
02:44
Or maybe a relationship goes up in smoke
誰かと一緒にいても
02:46
because we haven't had the time, or the patience,
時間に追われ 辛抱できず
02:48
or the tranquility,
平静を保てなくなり
02:50
to be with the other person, to listen to them.
人間関係がだめになるかもしれません
02:52
And my wake-up call came when I started
私への警告は
02:54
reading bedtime stories to my son,
子供を寝かしつけるときに
02:56
and I found that at the end of day,
やってきました
02:59
I would go into his room and I just couldn't slow down -- you know,
「帽子をかぶった猫」を読むのですが
03:01
I'd be speed reading "The Cat In The Hat."
ゆっくりと読むことに我慢できず
03:04
I'd be -- you know, I'd be skipping lines here,
所々を 時には1ページ全部を
03:06
paragraphs there, sometimes a whole page,
とばしてしまうのです
03:08
and of course, my little boy knew the book inside out, so we would quarrel.
息子は本を全部憶えているので 口論になります
03:10
And what should have been the most relaxing, the most intimate,
一日の中で最もリラックスし
03:13
the most tender moment of the day,
父として大切なわが子を
03:16
when a dad sits down to read to his son,
寝かしつけるという行為が
03:18
became instead this kind of gladiatorial battle of wills,
喧嘩になります
03:21
a clash between my speed
原因は私の速さと
03:24
and his slowness.
息子の遅さの不調和です
03:26
And this went on for some time,
この問題はしばらく続きました
03:29
until I caught myself scanning a newspaper article
新聞記事を見ていて
03:31
with timesaving tips for fast people.
時間節約のヒントという記事に
03:33
And one of them made reference to a series of books called
次のような本がありました
03:35
"The One-Minute Bedtime Story."
「1分間で済むベッドタイムストーリー」
03:37
And I wince saying those words now,
今ではあまり賛同しないタイトルですが
03:39
but my first reaction at the time was very different.
当時の私の反応は
03:42
My first reflex was to say,
違いました
03:44
"Hallelujah -- what a great idea!
「なんていいアイデアだ」
03:46
This is exactly what I'm looking for to speed up bedtime even more."
「これで早く寝かしつけることができる」
03:48
But thankfully,
しかし 有難いことに
03:51
a light bulb went on over my head, and my next reaction was very different,
ふとおかしいと感じたのです
03:53
and I took a step back, and I thought,
距離を置いて考えてみると
03:56
"Whoa -- you know, has it really come to this?
本当にそんな必要があるのか
03:58
Am I really in such a hurry that I'm prepared
息子との時間を削って
04:00
to fob off my son with a sound byte at the end of the day?"
スピードを重視する必要があるのか
04:02
And I put away the newspaper --
その時 飛行機に乗っていましたが
04:06
and I was getting on a plane -- and I sat there,
新聞を置いて
04:08
and I did something I hadn't done for a long time -- which is I did nothing.
久しぶりに何もしないで
04:10
I just thought, and I thought long and hard.
よく考えてみました
04:12
And by the time I got off that plane, I'd decided I wanted to do something about it.
降りるまでに決めたことがありました
04:15
I wanted to investigate this whole roadrunner culture,
スピード偏重の社会を調査し
04:18
and what it was doing to me and to everyone else.
私たちにどんな影響を与えているのか
04:21
And I had two questions in my head.
二つの論点が浮かびました
04:24
The first was, how did we get so fast?
一つ目は どのようにスピード偏重になったのか
04:26
And the second is, is it possible,
二つ目は スローダウンは可能なのか
そして
04:29
or even desirable, to slow down?
受け入れられるのか
04:31
Now, if you think about
スピード偏重にどのようになったか考えると
04:34
how our world got so accelerated, the usual suspects rear their heads.
まず頭に浮かぶ理由は
04:36
You think of, you know, urbanization,
都市化 大量消費
04:39
consumerism, the workplace, technology.
労働環境 技術革新などです
04:41
But I think if you cut through
しかし これらに惑わされず
04:44
those forces, you get to what might be the deeper
より根本の原因を考えると
04:46
driver, the nub of the question,
問題の核心に辿り着きます
04:49
which is how we think about time itself.
それは時間の概念です
04:52
In other cultures, time is cyclical.
ある文化では 時間は
04:54
It's seen as moving in great,
循環すると考えられています
04:57
unhurried circles.
ゆっくりと循環し
05:00
It's always renewing and refreshing itself.
絶えず更新し新調されるという概念です
05:02
Whereas in the West, time is linear.
西欧では時間は直線的です
05:04
It's a finite resource;
時間は限りあるもので
05:06
it's always draining away.
絶えず失われていきます
05:08
You either use it, or lose it.
使わないと失われてしまうという
05:10
"Time is money," as Benjamin Franklin said.
「時は金なり」という概念です
05:12
And I think what that does to us psychologically
心理的に私たちは
05:15
is it creates an equation.
方程式を作っています
05:17
Time is scarce, so what do we do?
時間は有限で貴重だから
05:19
Well -- well, we speed up, don't we?
スピードを上げよう
05:21
We try and do more and more with less and less time.
短時間でより多くのことをしようとします
05:23
We turn every moment of every day
日常の全てを
05:25
into a race to the finish line --
レースに置き換えます
05:27
a finish line, incidentally, that we never reach,
そして そのレースには
05:29
but a finish line nonetheless.
ゴールがありません
05:32
And I guess that the question is,
このような考え方から
05:34
is it possible to break free from that mindset?
脱却することは可能なのでしょうか
05:36
And thankfully, the answer is yes, because
ありがたいことに 可能なのです
05:38
what I discovered, when I began looking around, that there is
今 世界中で
05:40
a global backlash against this culture that
速い方がいい 忙しいほうがいい
05:42
tells us that faster is always better, and that busier is best.
という風潮への反発が起こっています
05:45
Right across the world, people are doing the unthinkable:
以前は考えられなかったことです
05:48
they're slowing down, and finding that,
社会通念上
05:51
although conventional wisdom tells you that if you slow down, you're road kill,
遅いことは悪いこととされていますが
05:53
the opposite turns out to be true:
そうではない場合もあります
05:56
that by slowing down at the right moments,
適切なときにスローダウンすることで
05:58
people find that they do everything better.
よりよい成果が出るとわかってきました
06:00
They eat better; they make love better; they exercise better;
食事 恋愛 運動 仕事など
06:02
they work better; they live better.
そして 生きるということもそうです
06:05
And, in this kind of cauldron
様々な場面で
06:08
of moments and places and acts of deceleration,
見られるスローダウンを勧める
06:11
lie what a lot of people now refer to as
現象は いわば世界的な
06:14
the "International Slow Movement."
スロー運動といえます
06:17
Now if you'll permit me a small act of hypocrisy,
スロー運動とはどういうものなのか
06:19
I'll just give you a very quick overview of
私なりに急いで
06:24
what's going on inside the Slow Movement. If you think of food,
お話しします まず食べ物です
06:27
many of you will have heard of the Slow Food movement.
スローフードがブームですね
06:30
Started in Italy, but has spread across the world,
イタリアから始まり世界に広がりました
06:32
and now has 100,000 members
現在50の国にわたり
06:34
in 50 countries.
10万人の会員がいます
06:36
And it's driven by a very simple and sensible message,
ゆっくりしたペースで食べ物を
06:38
which is that we get more pleasure and more health
栽培し 料理し 食することで
06:41
from our food when we
もっと喜びと健康を
06:44
cultivate, cook and consume it at a reasonable pace.
得ることができるというメッセージで成り立っています
06:46
I think also the explosion of
有機農業の人気や
06:50
the organic farming movement, and the renaissance of farmers' markets,
農業市場の再興からも
06:52
are other illustrations
人々が忙しい時間枠の中で
06:55
of the fact that people are desperate to get away from
食べたり料理したり
06:58
eating and cooking and cultivating their food
することから脱却したいと
07:01
on an industrial timetable.
考えているのがわかります
07:03
They want to get back to slower rhythms.
スローなリズムを取り戻したいのです
07:05
And out of the Slow Food movement has grown something
スローフード運動から派生したものとして
07:08
called the Slow Cities movement, which has started in Italy,
スローシティ運動があります  イタリアから
07:11
but has spread right across Europe and beyond.
ヨーロッパ全土に広がりました
07:14
And in this, towns
都市の景観を見直して
07:16
begin to rethink how they organize the urban landscape,
住民がスローダウンをしやすくし
07:18
so that people are encouraged to slow down
休息し 人とのつながりを増やそうという
07:21
and smell the roses and connect with one another.
運動です
07:24
So they might curb traffic,
交通量を減らし
07:26
or put in a park bench, or some green space.
ベンチを置いて緑を増やすなど
07:28
And in some ways, these changes add up to more than the sum of their parts,
スローシティーへの活動が
07:31
because I think when a Slow City becomes officially a Slow City,
最終的には
07:34
it's kind of like a philosophical declaration.
哲学的な宣言になります
07:37
It's saying to the rest of world, and to the people in that town,
町の人に そして 世界に向けて
07:39
that we believe that in the 21st century,
21世紀では
07:42
slowness has a role to play.
スローが大切という宣言です
07:44
In medicine, I think a lot of people are deeply disillusioned
医療においても多くの人が
07:48
with the kind of quick-fix mentality
その場しのぎの治療に
07:50
you find in conventional medicine.
幻滅しています
07:52
And millions of them around the world are turning
そして それらを
07:54
to complementary and alternative forms of medicine,
補完 もしくは 代替する
07:56
which tend to tap into sort of
スローで全人的な形態の
07:59
slower, gentler, more holistic forms of healing.
治療に注目し始めています
08:01
Now, obviously the jury is out on many of these complementary therapies,
これら多くの治療に結論は出ていません
08:04
and I personally doubt that the coffee enema
個人的にはコーヒーのかん腸が
08:07
will ever, you know, gain mainstream approval.
人気になるとは思いませんが
08:10
But other treatments
しかし他の方法  針治療や
08:13
such as acupuncture and massage, and even just relaxation,
マッサージ そして リラックスには
08:15
clearly have some kind of benefit.
何らかの効果があります
08:18
And blue-chip medical colleges everywhere
多くの有名な医大が
08:20
are starting to study these things to find out how they work,
これらがどのように効いているのか
08:22
and what we might learn from them.
学ぼうとしています
08:25
Sex. There's an awful lot of fast sex around, isn't there?
セックスも忙しいセックスが多いです
08:27
I was coming to --
最近 イッたときも・・・
08:29
well -- no pun intended there.
いや そっちじゃなくて
08:32
I was making my way, let's say, slowly to Oxford,
オックスフォードにですよ
08:35
and I went through a news agent, and I saw a magazine,
店頭で雑誌を見ました
08:38
a men's magazine, and it said on the front,
その男性誌のカバーには
08:40
"How to bring your partner to orgasm in 30 seconds."
「30秒でいかせる方法」と書いてありました
08:42
So, you know, even sex
セックスでさえ
08:45
is on a stopwatch these days.
時間との勝負です
08:47
Now, you know,
速いセックスが
08:49
I like a quickie as much as the next person,
だめというわけではないですが
08:51
but I think that there's an awful lot to be gained
スローなセックスから得られるものは
08:53
from slow sex -- from slowing down in the bedroom.
非常に多いと思います
08:56
You know, you tap into that -- those deeper,
感情的にも精神的にも
08:58
sort of, psychological, emotional, spiritual currents,
より深く触れ合うことで
09:01
and you get a better orgasm with the buildup.
より快感を
09:04
You can get more bang for your buck, let's say.
得ることができます
09:07
I mean, the Pointer Sisters said it most eloquently, didn't they,
ポインター・シスターズの歌にあるように
09:09
when they sang the praises of "a lover with a slow hand."
スローハンドが大切ですね
09:12
Now, we all laughed at Sting
スティングが数年前に
09:15
a few years ago when he went Tantric,
タントリックセックスに言及した際は
09:17
but you fast-forward a few years, and now you find couples of all ages
馬鹿にされましたが今では多くのカップルが
09:19
flocking to workshops, or maybe just
ワークショップに行ったり
09:22
on their own in their own bedrooms, finding ways
よりスローなセックスを
09:24
to put on the brakes and have better sex.
求めています
09:27
And of course, in Italy where -- I mean, Italians always seem to know
イタリア人は喜びを見つけるのが
09:30
where to find their pleasure --
上手ですが
09:32
they've launched an official Slow Sex movement.
スローセックス運動が正式に始まっています
09:34
The workplace.
労働に関しても
09:38
Right across much of the world --
北米は例外としても
09:40
North America being a notable exception --
多くの国で労働時間が
09:42
working hours have been coming down.
短くなっています
09:44
And Europe is an example of that,
ヨーロッパは労働時間を
09:46
and people finding that their quality of life improves
短くすることが生活の質だけでなく
09:48
as they're working less, and also
仕事の効率もあげるということが
09:51
that their hourly productivity goes up.
わかってきました
09:53
Now, clearly there are problems with
フランスでの
09:55
the 35-hour workweek in France --
週35時間労働制は
09:57
too much, too soon, too rigid.
柔軟性がなく 早計だったのは確かですが
09:59
But other countries in Europe, notably the Nordic countries,
北欧は 仕事中毒になることなく
10:01
are showing that it's possible
良好な経済状態を
10:04
to have a kick-ass economy
保つことが可能という
10:06
without being a workaholic.
証明しています
10:08
And Norway, Sweden,
ノルウェー スウェーデン
10:10
Denmark and Finland now rank
デンマーク フィンランドは今
10:12
among the top six most competitive nations on Earth,
世界の上位6カ国以内にランクされています
10:14
and they work the kind of hours that would make the average American
労働時間はアメリカ人が
10:17
weep with envy.
泣いてうらやましむほどです
10:19
And if you go beyond sort of the country level,
国レベルではなくミクロレベルで
10:21
down at the micro-company level,
見てみると
10:24
more and more companies now are realizing
多くの企業が
10:26
that they need to allow their staff
従業員の労働時間を
10:27
either to work fewer hours or just to unplug --
短縮するか
10:29
to take a lunch break, or to go sit in a quiet room,
休憩時間を増やし
10:31
to switch off their Blackberrys and laptops -- you at the back --
携帯やPCを切り
10:35
mobile phones,
仕事の合間や週末に
10:39
during the work day or on the weekend, so that they have time to recharge
リフレッシュすることで
10:41
and for the brain to slide into that
創造的な考えを
10:44
kind of creative mode of thought.
促しています
10:46
It's not just, though, these days,
大人だけではなく子供でさえ
10:50
adults who overwork, though, is it? It's children, too.
働きすぎです
10:53
I'm 37, and my childhood ended in the mid-'80s,
私は今37才なので80年代中盤に
10:56
and I look at kids now, and I'm just amazed by the way they
幼少時代を終えましたが
10:59
race around with more homework,
今日の子供は たくさんの宿題
11:01
more tutoring, more extracurriculars
家庭教師や課外活動で
11:03
than we would ever have conceived of a generation ago.
比べ物にならないくらい忙しいです
11:05
And some of the most heartrending emails
私のサイトに届いた
11:08
that I get on my website
胸の張り裂けるようなメールは
11:10
are actually from adolescents
疲れ果てているという
11:12
hovering on the edge of burnout, pleading with me
若者からで
11:15
to write to their parents,
私に自分たちの親を説得し
11:17
to help them slow down, to help them get off this
全速力の生活から救い出してほしいとの
11:19
full-throttle treadmill.
お願いでした
11:22
But thankfully, there is a backlash there in parenting as well,
しかし今 アメリカのいくつかの町では
11:25
and you're finding that, you know, towns in the United States
課外活動を禁止する日を
11:27
are now banding together and banning extracurriculars
協力して設定することで
11:29
on a particular day of the month, so that people can,
家族とゆっくり過ごすよう
11:32
you know, decompress and have some family time, and slow down.
促しています
11:34
Homework is another thing. There are homework bans
宿題に関しても同様です
11:38
springing up all over the developed world
先進国では長年にわたり
11:42
in schools which had been piling on the homework for years,
子供を宿題漬けにしてきましたが
11:44
and now they're discovering that less can be more.
宿題禁止が広がっています
11:47
So there was a case up in Scotland recently
スコットランドでは最近
11:49
where a fee-paying, high-achieving private school
私立の有名な進学校で
11:51
banned homework
13才以下への
11:53
for everyone under the age of 13,
宿題を禁止しました
11:55
and the high-achieving parents freaked out and said,
親たちは驚愕し子供の成績が
11:57
"What are you -- you know, our kids will fall" -- the headmaster said,
落ちることを危惧しましたが
11:59
"No, no, your children need to slow down at the end of the day."
スローダウンすることが大切と
12:01
And just this last month, the exam results came in,
校長は説き伏せ 結果的に
12:04
and in math, science, marks went up 20 percent
数学と科学の成績は昨年平均の
12:07
on average last year.
20%増になりました
12:10
And I think what's very revealing is that
また 英才教育の
12:12
the elite universities, who are often cited as the reason
代名詞となっている有名大学が
12:14
that people drive their kids and hothouse them so much,
生徒たちの力量の低下に
12:17
are starting to notice the caliber of students
気づき始めました
12:19
coming to them is falling. These kids have wonderful marks;
その生徒たちは考えられないくらい
12:22
they have CVs jammed with extracurriculars,
成績優秀で
12:25
to the point that would make your eyes water.
課外活動も多くこなしています
12:28
But they lack spark; they lack
しかし ひらめきが
12:30
the ability to think creatively and think outside --
そして 想像力が欠如し
12:32
they don't know how to dream. And so what these Ivy League schools,
夢がありません アイビーリーグや
12:34
and Oxford and Cambridge and so on, are starting to send a message
オックスフォード ケンブリッジ等の有名大学は
12:37
to parents and students that they need to put on the brakes a little bit.
親や生徒にもう少しスローダウンするように進言してます
12:39
And in Harvard, for instance, they send out
ハーバード大学では
12:42
a letter to undergraduates -- freshmen --
新入生に手紙を送り
12:45
telling them that they'll get more out of life, and more out of Harvard,
スローダウンして 一つ一つのことを
12:48
if they put on the brakes, if they do less,
深く味わい学ぶことで
12:51
but give time to things, the time that things need,
より多くのことを得ることができると
12:53
to enjoy them, to savor them.
伝えています
12:56
And even if they sometimes do nothing at all.
何もしないということでも
12:58
And that letter is called -- very revealing, I think --
学ぶことができるとも言っており
13:00
"Slow Down!" -- with an exclamation mark on the end.
この手紙は「スローダウンしよう!」という題が付いています
13:02
So wherever you look, the message, it seems to me, is the same:
このようなメッセージを見て
13:05
that less is very often more,
減らすということでより多くを学べ
13:08
that slower is very often
スローにすることで より良くなると
13:10
better. But that said, of course,
改めて感じますが
13:13
it's not that easy to slow down, is it?
スローダウンすることは容易ではありません
13:15
I mean, you heard that I got a speeding ticket
スローの効果に関する調査をしている時
13:17
while I was researching my book on the benefits of slowness,
スピード違反で捕まってしまいました
13:19
and that's true, but that's not all of it.
スローフードのレストランでの
13:21
I was actually en route to a dinner
夕食に向かう途中でした
13:23
held by Slow Food at the time.
それはイタリアでのことでしたが
13:25
And if that's not shaming enough, I got that ticket in Italy.
イタリアの高速で運転したことがある人なら
13:27
And if any of you have ever driven on an Italian highway,
どれだけスピードを出していたか
13:30
you'll have a pretty good idea of how fast I was going.
お分かりいただけると思います
13:33
(Laughter)
(笑い)
13:35
But why is it so hard to slow down?
なぜスローダウンするのは難しいのでしょう
13:38
I think there are various reasons.
理由はたくさんあります
13:40
One is that speed is fun, you know, speed is sexy.
スピードは時に楽しいものです
13:42
It's all that adrenaline rush. It's hard to give it up.
アドレナリンが出て病みつきになります
13:45
I think there's a kind of metaphysical dimension --
形而上学的には
13:48
that speed becomes a way of walling ourselves off
スピードは大きな深い疑問から
13:50
from the bigger, deeper questions.
自分を守る手段です
13:52
We fill our head with distraction, with busyness,
忙しさで頭をいっぱいにし
13:54
so that we don't have to ask,
健康や幸せ 子供たちの成長
13:56
am I well? Am I happy? Are my children growing up right?
国政について等 深く考えないように
13:58
Are politicians making good decisions on my behalf?
しているのです
14:01
Another reason -- although I think, perhaps, the most powerful reason --
もう一つの大きな理由として
14:05
why we find it hard to slow down is the cultural taboo
文化的なタブーが関わっています
14:07
that we've erected against slowing down.
私たちの文化でスローダウンは
14:10
"Slow" is a dirty word in our culture.
よくないことと見なしてきました
14:13
It's a byword for "lazy," "slacker,"
スローは怠惰や
14:15
for being somebody who gives up.
怠け者の代名詞です
14:17
You know, "he's a bit slow." It's actually synonymous
「彼はスローだ」という言葉は
14:19
with being stupid.
「馬鹿」と同義です
14:21
I guess what the Slow Movement -- the purpose of the Slow Movement,
スロー運動の目的は
14:24
or its main goal, really, is to tackle that taboo,
タブーに立ち向かうことです
14:26
and to say that yes,
もちろん
14:28
sometimes slow is not the answer,
スローが常に正しいわけではなく
14:31
that there is such a thing as "bad slow."
悪いスローというものもあります
14:33
You know, I got stuck on the M25,
ロンドンの25号線で
14:35
which is a ring road around London, recently,
3時間半も
14:37
and spent three-and-a-half hours there. And I can tell you,
渋滞に巻き込まれました これは
14:39
that's really bad slow.
悪いスローといえます
14:41
But the new idea,
しかし新しい考え方では
14:43
the sort of revolutionary idea, of the Slow Movement,
良いスローという革新的なことに
14:45
is that there is such a thing as "good slow," too.
着眼しています
14:47
And good slow is, you know, taking the time
良いスローとはテレビを消して
14:49
to eat a meal with your family, with the TV switched off.
家族とゆっくり食事をすることです
14:51
Or taking the time to look at a problem from all angles
また 仕事では時間をかけて
14:54
in the office to make the best decision
問題を様々な角度から
14:57
at work.
検証することです
14:59
Or even simply just taking the time
また 単純に
15:01
to slow down
ゆっくり自分の人生を
15:03
and savor your life.
楽しむことです
15:05
Now, one of the things that I found most uplifting
本を出版してから
15:07
about all of this stuff that's happened around the book
一番うれしいことは
15:10
since it came out, is the reaction to it.
その反響です
15:13
And I knew that when my book on slowness came out,
スローに関する本が
15:16
it would be welcomed by the New Age brigade,
新しい世代に共感されることは
15:18
but it's also been taken up, with great gusto,
予想していましたが
15:20
by the corporate world -- you know,
業界紙に取り上げられ
15:23
business press, but also
大企業や組織も
15:25
big companies and leadership organizations.
興味を示してくれました
15:27
Because people at the top of the chain, people like you, I think,
組織のトップの方々が
15:29
are starting to realize that there's too much
スピード偏重の問題に
15:32
speed in the system,
気づいて
15:34
there's too much busyness, and it's time to find,
スローダウンする必要性を
15:36
or get back to that lost art of shifting gears.
感じています
15:39
Another encouraging sign, I think,
また 先進国だけでなく
15:43
is that it's not just in the developed world
先進国の仲間入りを果たそうとしている
15:45
that this idea's been taken up. In the developing world,
新興国である
15:47
in countries that are on the verge of making that leap
中国やブラジル
15:50
into first world status -- China, Brazil,
タイやポーランドでも
15:52
Thailand, Poland, and so on --
同様にスロー運動の考えが
15:54
these countries have embraced the idea of the Slow Movement,
多くの人に共感を与えており
15:56
many people in them, and there's a debate going on
メディアや市民間で
15:59
in their media, on the streets.
話し合われています
16:02
Because I think they're looking at the West, and they're saying,
彼らにとって西欧諸国は
16:04
"Well, we like that aspect of what you've got,
見習うべきものでもありますが
16:06
but we're not so sure about that."
そうでないところもあると感じているのです
16:09
So all of that said, is it,
つまるところ
16:11
I guess, is it possible?
私たちの前に立ちはだかる疑問は
16:13
That's really the main question before us today. Is it possible
スローダウンすることは
16:16
to slow down? And
本当に可能なのかどうかです
16:19
I'm happy to be able to say to you
答えは
16:21
that the answer is a resounding yes.
はっきりと可能といえます
16:23
And I present myself as Exhibit A,
その証拠として 私自身が
16:25
a kind of reformed and rehabilitated
スピード中毒から
16:28
speed-aholic.
更生できています
16:31
I still love speed. You know, I live in London,
いまだにスピードは好きです
16:33
and I work as a journalist,
ロンドンに住んでますし
16:35
and I enjoy the buzz and the busyness,
記者ですから 忙しさからくる
16:37
and the adrenaline rush that comes from both of those things.
アドレナリンを感じることは好きです
16:39
I play squash and ice hockey,
スカッシュやアイスホッケーという
16:41
two very fast sports, and I wouldn't give them up for the world.
スピード重視のスポーツが好きです
16:43
But I've also, over the last year or so,
しかしここ数年
16:47
got in touch with my inner tortoise.
心の中の亀とも共存しています
16:50
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:52
And what that means is that
以前のように
16:53
I no longer
やみくもに背負いすぎない
16:55
overload myself gratuitously.
ようにしています
16:58
My default mode is no longer
スピード偏重でも
17:01
to be a rush-aholic.
なくなりました
17:04
I no longer hear
時間が刻一刻と
17:07
time's winged chariot drawing near,
迫りくる感覚は
17:09
or at least not as much as I did before.
もう感じられなくなるほどになりました
17:11
I can actually hear it now, because I see my time is ticking off.
今日の残り時間が迫っているのは見えています
17:13
And the upshot of all of that is that
これらの結果として
17:17
I actually feel a lot happier, healthier,
私はより幸せに より健康に
17:19
more productive than I ever have.
より生産的になることができ
17:22
I feel like I'm living
人生をレースするのではなく
17:25
my life rather than actually just racing through it.
生きていると感じることができます
17:27
And perhaps, the most important
そして 何よりもの成功は
17:31
measure of the success of this
人間関係が
17:33
is that I feel that my relationships are a lot deeper,
より深く豊かに強くなったこと
17:35
richer, stronger.
だと思います
17:38
And for me, I guess, the litmus test
うまくいっているかは
17:40
for whether this would work, and what it would mean,
いつも子供を寝かしつける時に
17:43
was always going to be bedtime stories, because that's sort of where
わかります
17:45
the journey began. And there too the news is
スローへの回帰が始まった原点です
17:48
rosy. You know,
一日の終わりに
17:51
at the end of the day, I go into my son's room.
子供の部屋に入る時
17:53
I don't wear a watch. I switch off my computer,
腕時計はつけません
17:55
so I can't hear the email pinging into the basket,
パソコンも消します
17:57
and I just slow down to his pace and we read.
子供のペースに合わせて本を読みます
17:59
And because children have their own tempo and internal clock,
子供たちは自分たちのペースを
18:03
they don't do quality time,
もっています
18:06
where you schedule 10 minutes for them to open up to you.
10分間のベッドタイムストーリーを
18:08
They need you to move at their rhythm.
子供のペースで読んで聞かせると
18:10
I find that 10 minutes into a story, you know,
突然 「今日学校で
18:13
my son will suddenly say, "You know,
嫌なことがあったんだ」と
18:15
something happened in the playground today that really bothered me."
話し始めます そして
18:17
And we'll go off and have a conversation on that.
二人でそれについて話すのです
18:19
And I now find that bedtime stories
以前は本を読み聞かせるのは
18:22
used to be
To Doリストの一つであり
18:25
a box on my to-do list, something that I dreaded,
時間がかかるため
18:27
because it was so slow and I had to get through it quickly.
好きではありませんでした
18:30
It's become my reward at the end of the day,
今では一日の終わりのご褒美で
18:32
something I really cherish.
とても大切な時間です
18:34
And I have a kind of Hollywood ending
ハリウッド映画の
18:36
to my talk this afternoon,
ハッピーエンドみたいですが
18:38
which goes a little bit like this:
数ヶ月前に
18:40
a few months ago, I was getting ready to go on
本の宣伝ツアーのため
18:42
another book tour, and I had my bags packed.
荷物を用意して
18:45
I was downstairs by the front door, and I was waiting for a taxi,
一階でタクシーを待っていると
18:48
and my son came down the stairs and
息子が手作りのカードを持って
18:51
he'd made a card for me. And he was carrying it.
二階から下りてきました
18:53
He'd gone and stapled two cards, very like these, together,
二つのカードを重ねて留めて
18:55
and put a sticker of his favorite
好きなキャラクターが前面に
18:57
character, Tintin, on the front.
貼ってあります
19:00
And he said to me,
受け取って
19:02
or he handed this to me, and I read it,
読んでみると
19:04
and it said, "To Daddy, love Benjamin."
「お父さんへ愛をこめて」と
19:06
And I thought, "Aw, that's really sweet.
書いてあり 「ありがとう
19:08
Is that a good luck on the book tour card?"
本のツアーのお守りかな」というと
19:11
And he said, "No, no, no, Daddy -- this is a card
「違うよ お父さんは世界で一番
19:14
for being the best story reader in the world."
本を読むのが上手だからだよ」
19:16
And I thought, "Yeah, you know, this slowing down thing really does work."
やはりスローダウンすることは大切ですね
19:18
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
19:21
Translated by Akira Koizumi
Reviewed by Shogo Kobayashi

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About the speaker:

Carl Honore - Journalist
In his book In Praise of Slowness, Carl Honoré dissects our speed-obsessed society and celebrates those who have gotten in touch with their "inner tortoise."

Why you should listen

Canadian-born journalist Carl Honoré has written for The Economist, the Houston Chronicle, the Observer, and the National Post, but he is best known for his advocacy of the Slow Movement. A loose and international effort by the harried and haggard to decelerate the pace of their lives, the Slow Movement spans everything from telecommunications (slow email) and health care (slow medicine) to diet (slow food) and public space (slow cities).

Honore's bestselling book In Praise of Slowness plots the lineage of our speed-obsessed society
; while it recognizes the difficulty of slowing down, it also highlights the successes of everyday people around the world who have found ways of doing it. Honoré traces his "Aha" moment to his son's bedtime, when Honore would race through storybooks -- skipping pages, reading portions of paragraphs -- to move things along. (He's since reformed.) His latest book, Under Pressure, is about how we are raising a generation of overprogrammed, overachieving and exhausted children.

More profile about the speaker
Carl Honore | Speaker | TED.com