09:21
TED2007

Gever Tulley: 5 dangerous things you should let your kids do

ゲーバー・タリー:子どもがすべき5つの危険なこと

Filmed:

工作の学校の創始者であるゲーバー・タリーが、子どもにさせるべき5つの危険なことについて語ります。2007年のTED Universityでの講演より。

- Tinkerer
The founder of the Tinkering School, Gever Tulley likes to build things with kids. Full bio

Welcome to "Five Dangerous Things You Should Let Your Children Do."
「子どもにさせるべき5つの危険なこと」にようこそ
00:13
I don't have children.
私には子どもがいません
00:18
I borrow my friends' children, so
友人たちの子どもを借りています - だから
00:20
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:22
take all this advice with a grain of salt.
これからの話は鵜呑みにしないで下さい
00:26
I'm Gever Tulley.
私はゲーバー・タリーです
00:28
I'm a contract computer scientist by trade,
コンピュータ科学者をしていますが
00:31
but I'm the founder of something called the Tinkering School.
工作の学校と呼ばれるところの創始者でもあります
00:35
It's a summer program which aims to help kids to learn
そこはサマースクールで、子どもたちが
00:40
how to build the things that they think of.
思い描くものの作り方を学ぶ手助けをします
00:43
So we build a lot of things.
私たちはたくさんのものを作ります
00:46
And I do put power tools into the hands of second-graders.
小学校2年生にも電動工具を持たせます
00:48
So if you're thinking about sending your kid to Tinkering School,
だから、もしあなたがたの子どもを工作の学校に参加させたなら
00:51
they do come back bruised, scraped and bloody.
打ち身や引っかき傷を作り、血を流して帰ってくるでしょう
00:55
So, you know, we live in a world
知っての通り、世の中では
01:00
that's subjected to ever more stringent child safety regulations.
子どもの安全規制がますます厳しくなっています
01:02
There doesn't seem to be any limit on how crazy
それがどれほどおかしなものになるのか、
01:06
child safety regulations can get.
際限がないように思えます
01:12
We put suffocation warnings on all the -- on every piece of plastic film
アメリカで製造されたり、アメリカで販売される製品に
01:14
manufactured in the United States or for sale
つけられた全てのビニール・フィルムには
01:19
with an item in the United States.
窒息注意の警告が書かれています
01:21
We put warnings on coffee cups to tell us
コーヒーカップには
01:23
that the contents may be hot.
中身が熱いかもしれないという注意書きがあります
01:26
And we seem to think that any item
それに私たちは、ゴルフボールよりも鋭いものは全て
01:29
sharper than a golf ball is too sharp
10歳以下の子どもにとっては鋭すぎると
01:33
for children under the age of 10.
考えているかのようです
01:35
So where does this trend stop?
この風潮はどこで止まるのでしょうか?
01:37
When we round every corner and eliminate every sharp object,
あらゆる場所をまわって全ての尖ったものや
01:41
every pokey bit in the world,
刺さるものを取り去ったならば
01:46
then the first time that kids come in contact with anything sharp
子どもたちが初めて何か鋭いものや
01:49
or not made out of round plastic,
丸いプラスチック製のもの以外の何かに接した時
01:53
they'll hurt themselves with it.
彼らはそれで怪我をするでしょう
01:56
So, as the boundaries of what we determine as the safety zone
安全ゾーンの範囲を狭めるにつれて
01:59
grow ever smaller, we cut off our children from valuable opportunities
我々は子どもたちを身の回りの世界との接し方を学ぶ
02:05
to learn how to interact with the world around them.
貴重な機会から遠ざけているのです
02:11
And despite all of our best efforts and intentions,
それに我々が精一杯努力したとしても
02:14
kids are always going to figure out
子どもたちはいつも
02:18
how to do the most dangerous thing they can,
自分たちにできる一番危険なことを見つけようとします
02:19
in whatever environment they can.
たとえどんな環境であっても
02:22
So despite the provocative title, this presentation is really about safety
だから、挑発的なタイトルをつけてはいますが、このプレゼンテーションは
02:25
and about some simple things that we can do
実は安全と、子どもたちの創造性を育み
02:32
to raise our kids to be creative, confident
彼らに自信を持たせ、身の回りの環境をコントロールできるように
02:36
and in control of the environment around them.
するための育て方についての話なのです
02:42
And what I now present to you is an excerpt from a book in progress.
これから私が紹介するのは執筆中の本からの抜粋です
02:45
The book is called "50 Dangerous Things."
その本は「50の危険なこと」という題名です
02:51
This is five dangerous things.
これから話すのは5つです
02:53
Thing number one -- play with fire.
一つ目 ‐ 火を使って遊びなさい
02:55
Learning to control one of the most elemental forces in nature
自然界の最も基本的な力のひとつをコントロールすることを学ぶのは
02:58
is a pivotal moment in any child's personal history.
どんな子どもの人生にとっても極めて重要な瞬間です
03:03
Whether we remember it or not,
覚えていようがいまいが
03:07
it's a -- it's the first time we really get
それは私たちが謎めいた自然の力のひとつを
03:09
control of one of these mysterious things.
初めてコントロールした時なのです
03:12
These mysteries are only revealed
それらの謎が解き明かされるのは
03:15
to those who get the opportunity to play with it.
火で遊ぶ機会を得た者に対してのみです
03:17
So, playing with fire.
火で遊ぶこと
03:19
This is like one of the great things we ever discovered, fire.
それは私たちがこれまでに発見した偉大なことのひとつです
03:22
From playing with it, they learn some basic principles about fire,
火で遊ぶことにより、子どもたちは火について、
03:28
about intake, about combustion, about exhaust.
また吸気、燃焼、排気についての基本原理を学びます
03:31
These are the three working elements of fire
これらは上手に火をコントロールするために
03:35
that you have to have to have a good controlled fire.
必要な3つの要素です
03:37
And you can think of the open-pit fire as a laboratory.
露天の火は研究所のようなものです
03:40
You don't know what they're going to learn from playing with it.
子どもたちがそれで遊ぶことから何を学ぶのかはわかりません
03:45
You know, let them fool around with it on their own terms and trust me,
でも、彼らのやり方で火と遊ばせてみなさい すると
03:47
they're going to learn things
子どもたちは「ドーラといっしょに大冒険」のおもちゃで遊んでも
03:53
that you can't get out of playing with Dora the Explorer toys.
得られないようなことを学ぶでしょう
03:55
Number two -- own a pocketknife.
二つ目 ‐ ポケットナイフを持ちなさい
04:01
Pocketknives are kind of drifting out of our cultural consciousness,
ポケットナイフは私たちの文化意識から流れ出てしまっているかのようです
04:04
which I think is a terrible thing.
それはひどいことだと思います
04:09
(Laughter)
(笑い)
04:11
Your first -- your first pocketknife is like the first universal tool that you're given.
初めてのポケットナイフは自分に与えられた初めての万能ツールです
04:15
You know, it's a spatula, it's a pry bar,
それはヘラでもあり、バールでもあり、
04:20
it's a screwdriver and it's a blade.
ネジ回しでもあり、刃でもあります
04:23
And it's a -- it's a powerful and empowering tool.
そしてそれは - それは力強くまた力を与えてくれる道具でもあります
04:26
And in a lot of cultures they give knives --
多くの文化では幼児になるとすぐに
04:31
like, as soon as they're toddlers they have knives.
ナイフを与えられます
04:34
These are Inuit children cutting whale blubber.
これはイヌイットの子どもたちが鯨の脂身を切っているところです
04:36
I first saw this in a Canadian Film Board film when I was 10,
私は10歳の時にこれをカナダ映画庁の映画で見て、
04:40
and it left a lasting impression, to see babies playing with knives.
赤ん坊がナイフで遊んでいるというのは以来ずっと心に残っていました
04:44
And it shows that kids can develop an extended sense of self
子どもたちはとても幼い時でも道具を通して自らの能力が
04:48
through a tool at a very young age.
広がっていくのを感じることができるのです
04:52
You lay down a couple of very simple rules --
2,3のとても簡単な決まりごとを作ってください
04:54
always cut away from your body, keep the blade sharp, never force it
いつも体から離して切ることや、刃を鋭くしておくこと、そして無理をしないこと
04:57
-- and these are things kids can understand and practice with.
― これらは子どもたちが理解できますし、実行できることです
05:02
And yeah, they're going to cut themselves.
確かに子どもたちは怪我をするでしょう
05:05
I have some terrible scars on my legs from where I stabbed myself.
私の足には自分でやったひどい切り傷がいくつかあります
05:06
But you know, they're young. They heal fast.
でも子どもたちは若いので治りも早いのです
05:10
(Laughter)
(笑い)
05:12
Number three -- throw a spear.
三つ目 - 槍を投げなさい
05:16
It turns out that our brains are actually wired for throwing things
私たちの脳は実のところ物を投げることとつながっています
05:19
and, like muscles, if you don't use parts of your brain,
そして筋肉のように、もし脳の一部を使わなければ
05:23
they tend to atrophy over time.
その部分はやがて退化します
05:28
But when you exercise them,
でももし使われれば
05:31
any given muscle adds strength to the whole system
どんな筋肉でも全体を力強くします
05:34
and that applies to your brain too.
脳でも同じことが言えるのです
05:36
So practicing throwing things has been shown to
物を投げる練習をすることは前頭葉と側頭葉を
05:39
stimulate the frontal and parietal lobes,
刺激することがわかっていて、
05:43
which have to do with visual acuity, 3D understanding,
それは視覚の鋭敏さや三次元の理解力、そして構造的な問題解決力と
05:46
and structural problem solving, so it gives a sense --
関連があります だから物を投げるのは意味があることなのです
05:51
it helps develop their visualization skills and their predictive ability.
それは子どもたちの視覚化能力や予測力を伸ばすのに役立つのです
05:56
And throwing is a combination of analytical and physical skill,
投げるというのは分析力と身体の技能が合わさった行為です
06:01
so it's very good for that kind of whole-body training.
だから全身のトレーニングにはとてもよいのです
06:06
These kinds of target-based practice also
こうしたターゲットのある訓練は
06:10
helps kids develop attention and concentration skills.
子どもたちの注意力や集中力を伸ばすのにも有効です
06:16
So those are great.
物を投げるのはすごいことなのです
06:21
Number four -- deconstruct appliances.
四つ目 - 電化製品を分解しなさい
06:23
There is a world of interesting things inside your dishwasher.
家の皿洗い機の中には面白いものが詰まった世界が広がっています
06:27
Next time you're about to throw out an appliance, don't throw it out.
次に何かの電化製品を処分する時には、捨てるのではなく
06:31
Take it apart with your kid, or send him to my school
子どもと一緒に分解するか、子どもを私の学校に来させてください
06:36
and we'll take it apart with them.
そうすれば私たちが一緒に分解しますから
06:39
Even if you don't know what the parts are,
知らない部品だったとしても
06:41
puzzling out what they might be for
それが何なのかを解き明かすことは
06:43
is a really good practice for the kids
子どもたちにとってとてもよい訓練です
06:46
to get sort of the sense that they can take things apart,
彼らは物を分解できるんだという意識を持つようになりますし
06:49
and no matter how complex they are,
どんなに複雑な物でも
06:55
they can understand parts of them and that means that eventually,
その一部がわかれば最終的には全体を理解できるんだ
06:57
they can understand all of them.
と思うようになるでしょう
07:01
It's a sense of knowability, that something is knowable.
それは、何かを知ることができるという意識です
07:03
So these black boxes that we live with and take for granted
私たちが当たり前のように接しているこれらの謎の箱は
07:07
are actually complex things made by other people
誰かが作ったかなり複雑な物なのですが
07:10
and you can understand them.
あなたはそれを理解することができるのです
07:14
Number five -- two-parter.
五つ目 - ここは2つあります
07:16
Break the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.
まず、デジタル著作権法に違反しなさい
07:20
(Laughter)
(笑い)
07:22
There are laws beyond safety regulations
安全規制のほかにも
07:25
that attempt to limit how we can interact with the things
私たちと自らの所有する物 -この場合はデジタル・メディア- との間の
07:28
that we own -- in this case, digital media.
接し方を制限しようとする法律があります
07:31
It's a very simple exercise -- buy a song on ITunes, write it to a CD,
とても簡単な練習です - iTunesで曲を買い、それをCDに書き込み、
07:34
then rip the CD to an MP3 and play it on your very same computer.
そのCDをMP3にリッピングして同じパソコンで曲をかけて下さい
07:41
You've just broken a law.
法律に違反したことになります
07:44
Technically the RIAA can come and persecute you.
法的には全米レコード協会がやってきてあなたを処罰することができます
07:46
It's an important lesson for kids to understand --
一部の法律には偶然に違反してしまうことがあること
07:50
that some of these laws get broken by accident
そして法律には解釈が必要だということを学ぶのは
07:52
and that laws have to be interpreted.
子どもたちにとって大切なレッスンです
07:56
And it's something we often talk about with the kids
それは、我々が物と戯れながらそれをこじ開け
07:58
when we're fooling around with things and breaking them open
分解して何か別な目的に使ったり、
08:01
and taking them apart and using them for other things --
車で出かけたりする時に
08:05
and also when we go out and drive a car.
子どもに話すようなことです
08:08
Driving a car is a -- is a really empowering act for a young child,
車を運転すること - それは小さな子どもにとって本当にわくわくするような行為です
08:14
so this is the ultimate.
これは究極です
08:18
(Laughter)
(笑い)
08:20
For those of you who aren't comfortable actually breaking the law,
実際に法律違反することはあまり気が進まないという人は
08:22
you can drive a car with your child.
子どもと一緒に運転すればいいのです
08:26
This is -- this is a great stage for a kid.
これは子どもにとってはものすごい舞台です
08:29
This happens about the same time
子どもが車に夢中になるのは
08:32
that they get latched onto things like dinosaurs,
彼らが恐竜のようなもの、
08:34
these big things in the outside world
外の世界にある大きな物を
08:37
that they're trying to get a grip on.
理解しようとするのと同じ時期のことです
08:39
A car is a similar object, and they can get in a car and drive it.
車も同じようなもので、しかも子どもたちは車に乗りこんで運転することができるのです
08:41
And that's a really, like -- it gives them a handle on a world
それは正に、子どもたちに普段はできないような
08:46
in a way that they wouldn't -- that they don't often have access to.
方法で世界に触れる機会を与えることになるのです
08:50
So -- and it's perfectly legal.
そしてそれは完全に合法的です
08:55
Find a big empty lot, make sure there's nothing in it
広い空き地を見つけて、そこに何もないことと
08:57
and it's on private property, and let them drive your car.
それが私有地であることを確認し、子どもたちに車を運転させなさい
08:59
It's very safe actually.
実際それはとても安全です
09:03
And it's fun for the whole family.
それに家族全員が楽しめるでしょう
09:05
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:07
So, let's see.
そうですね
09:09
I think that's it. That's number five and a half. OK.
これで終わりです これが5番目と半分です 以上
09:11
Translated by Wataru Narita
Reviewed by Masahiro Kyushima

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Gever Tulley - Tinkerer
The founder of the Tinkering School, Gever Tulley likes to build things with kids.

Why you should listen

Gever Tulley writes the best Twitters: Just landed my paraglider in an empty field behind Santa 8arbara. ... Making amazing tshirts with a laser cutter at the maker faire in austin. ... Washing fruit, putting sheets on bunkbeds, and grinding up aluminum foil in a cheap blender ... Updating the school blog, trying to figure out how many cubic feet of air are in a 5 gallon cylinder at 200 PSI. ... Trying to figure out if the tinker kids are going to be able to get molten iron from magnetite sand ...

A software engineer, Gever Tulley is the co-founder of the Tinkering School, a weeklong camp where lucky kids get to play with their very own power tools. He's interested in helping kids learn how to build, solve problems, use new materials and hack old ones for new purposes. He's also a certified paragliding instructor.

More profile about the speaker
Gever Tulley | Speaker | TED.com