Andres Lozano: Parkinson's, depression and the switch that might turn them off

TEDxCaltech

Andres Lozano: Parkinson's, depression and the switch that might turn them off

January 18, 2013


Deep brain stimulation is becoming very precise. This technique allows surgeons to place electrodes in almost any area of the brain, and turn them up or down -- like a radio dial or thermostat -- to correct dysfunction. Andres Lozano offers a dramatic look at emerging techniques, in which a woman with Parkinson's instantly stops shaking and brain areas eroded by Alzheimer's are brought back to life. (Filmed at TEDxCaltech.)

BLACK: My journey to yo-yo mastery

TED2013

BLACK: My journey to yo-yo mastery

February 27, 2013


Remember the days you struggled just to make a yo-yo spin, and if you were really fancy, to “walk the dog”? You ain’t seen nothin’ yet. Japanese yo-yo world champion BLACK tells the inspiring story of finding his life's passion, and gives an awesome performance that will make you want to pull your yo-yo back out of the closet.

Joshua Prager: In search of the man who broke my neck

TED2013

Joshua Prager: In search of the man who broke my neck

March 1, 2013


When Joshua Prager was 19, a devastating bus accident left him a hemiplegic. He returned to Israel twenty years later to find the driver who turned his world upside down. In this mesmerizing tale of their meeting, Prager probes deep questions of nature, nurture, self-deception and identity.

Thomas Insel: Toward a new understanding of mental illness

TEDxCaltech

Thomas Insel: Toward a new understanding of mental illness

January 18, 2013


Today, thanks to better early detection, there are 63% fewer deaths from heart disease than there were just a few decades ago. Thomas Insel, Director of the National Institute of Mental Health, wonders: Could we do the same for depression and schizophrenia? The first step in this new avenue of research, he says, is a crucial reframing: for us to stop thinking about “mental disorders” and start understanding them as “brain disorders.” (Filmed at TEDxCaltech.)

Rose George: Let's talk crap. Seriously.

TED2013

Rose George: Let's talk crap. Seriously.

February 27, 2013


It's 2013, yet 2.5 billion people in the world have no access to a basic sanitary toilet. And when there's no loo, where do you poo? In the street, probably near your water and food sources -- causing untold death and disease from contamination. Get ready for a blunt, funny, powerful talk from journalist Rose George about a once-unmentionable problem.

Laura Snyder: The Philosophical Breakfast Club

TEDGlobal 2012

Laura Snyder: The Philosophical Breakfast Club

June 19, 2012


In 1812, four men at Cambridge University met for breakfast. What began as an impassioned meal grew into a new scientific revolution, in which these men -- who called themselves “natural philosophers” until they later coined “scientist” -- introduced four major principles into scientific inquiry. Historian and philosopher Laura Snyder tells their intriguing story.

Eric Dishman: Health care should be a team sport

TED@Intel

Eric Dishman: Health care should be a team sport

March 27, 2013


When Eric Dishman was in college, doctors told him he had 2 to 3 years to live. That was a long time ago. Now, Dishman puts his experience and his expertise as a medical tech specialist together to suggest a bold idea for reinventing health care -- by putting the patient at the center of a treatment team.

Freeman Hrabowski: 4 pillars of college success in science

TED2013

Freeman Hrabowski: 4 pillars of college success in science

February 28, 2013


At age 12, Freeman Hrabowski marched with Martin Luther King. Now he's president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), where he works to create an environment that helps under-represented students -- specifically African-American, Latino and low-income learners -- get degrees in math and science. He shares the four pillars of UMBC's approach.

Keller Rinaudo: A mini robot -- powered by your phone

TED2013

Keller Rinaudo: A mini robot -- powered by your phone

February 26, 2013


Your smartphone may feel like a friend -- but a true friend would give you a smile once in a while. At TED2013, Keller Rinaudo demos Romo, the smartphone-powered mini robot who can motor along with you on a walk, slide you a cup of coffee across the table, and react to you with programmable expressions.

Ken Jennings: Watson, Jeopardy and me, the obsolete know-it-all

TEDxSeattleU

Ken Jennings: Watson, Jeopardy and me, the obsolete know-it-all

February 10, 2013


Trivia whiz Ken Jennings has made a career as a keeper of facts; he holds the longest winning streak in history on the U.S. game show Jeopardy. But in 2011, he played a challenge match against supercomputer Watson -- and lost. With humor and humility, Jennings tells us how it felt to have a computer literally beat him at his own game, and also makes the case for good old-fashioned human knowledge. (Filmed at TEDxSeattleU.)

Skylar Tibbits: The emergence of "4D printing"

TED2013

Skylar Tibbits: The emergence of "4D printing"

February 25, 2013


3D printing has grown in sophistication since the late 1970s; TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits is shaping the next development, which he calls 4D printing, where the fourth dimension is time. This emerging technology will allow us to print objects that then reshape themselves or self-assemble over time. Think: a printed cube that folds before your eyes, or a printed pipe able to sense the need to expand or contract.

Dan Ariely: What makes us feel good about our work?

TEDxRiodelaPlata

Dan Ariely: What makes us feel good about our work?

October 24, 2012


What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money. But it's not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioral economist Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our work. (Filmed at TEDxRiodelaPlata.)

Katherine Kuchenbecker: The technology of touch

TEDYouth 2012

Katherine Kuchenbecker: The technology of touch

November 17, 2012


As we move through the world, we have an innate sense of how things feel -- the sensations they produce on our skin and how our bodies orient to them. Can technology leverage this? In this fun, fascinating TED-Ed lesson, learn about the field of haptics, and how it could change everything from the way we shop online to how dentists learn the telltale feel of a cavity.

Sanjay Dastoor: A skateboard, with a boost

TED2013

Sanjay Dastoor: A skateboard, with a boost

February 27, 2013


Imagine an electric vehicle that can get you to work -- or anywhere in a six-mile radius -- quickly, without traffic frustrations or gasoline. Now imagine you can pick it up and carry it with you. Yes, this souped-up skateboard could change the face of morning commutes.

Kees Moeliker: How a dead duck changed my life

TED2013

Kees Moeliker: How a dead duck changed my life

February 28, 2013


One afternoon, Kees Moeliker got a research opportunity few ornithologists would wish for: A flying duck slammed into his glass office building, died, and then … what happened next would change his life. [Note: Contains graphic images and descriptions of sexual behavior in animals.]

Lawrence Lessig: We the People, and the Republic we must reclaim

TED2013

Lawrence Lessig: We the People, and the Republic we must reclaim

February 27, 2013


There is a corruption at the heart of American politics, caused by the dependence of Congressional candidates on funding from the tiniest percentage of citizens. That's the argument at the core of this blistering talk by legal scholar Lawrence Lessig. With rapid-fire visuals, he shows how the funding process weakens the Republic in the most fundamental way, and issues a rallying bipartisan cry that will resonate with many in the U.S. and beyond.

Colin Camerer: Neuroscience, game theory, monkeys

TEDxCaltech

Colin Camerer: Neuroscience, game theory, monkeys

January 18, 2013


When two people are trying to make a deal -- whether they’re competing or cooperating -- what’s really going on inside their brains? Behavioral economist Colin Camerer shows research that reveals just how little we’re able to predict what others are thinking. And he presents an unexpected study that shows chimpanzees might just be better at it than we are. (Filmed at TEDxCalTech.)

Mark Shaw: One very dry demo

TED2013

Mark Shaw: One very dry demo

February 28, 2013


Mark Shaw demos Ultra-Ever Dry, a liquid-repellent coating that acts as an astonishingly powerful shield against water and water-based materials. At the nano level, the spray covers a surface with an umbrella of air so that water bounces right off. Watch for an exciting two-minute kicker.

Richard Turere: My invention that made peace with lions

TED2013

Richard Turere: My invention that made peace with lions

February 27, 2013


In the Masai community where 13-year-old Richard Turere lives, cattle are all-important. But lion attacks were growing more frequent. In this short, inspiring talk, the young inventor shares the solar-powered solution he designed to safely scare the lions away.

Jessica Green: We're covered in germs. Let's design for that.

TED2013

Jessica Green: We're covered in germs. Let's design for that.

February 25, 2013


Our bodies and homes are covered in microbes -- some good for us, some bad for us. As we learn more about the germs and microbes who share our living spaces, TED Fellow Jessica Green asks: Can we design buildings that encourage happy, healthy microbial environments?

Eric Whitacre: Virtual Choir Live

TED2013

Eric Whitacre: Virtual Choir Live

March 1, 2013


Composer and conductor Eric Whitacre has inspired millions by bringing together "virtual choirs," singers from many countries spliced together on video. Now, for the first time ever, he creates the experience in real time, as 32 singers from around the world Skype in to join an onstage choir (assembled from three local colleges) for an epic performance of Whitacre's "Cloudburst," based on a poem by Octavio Paz.

Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now

TEDMED 2012

Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now

April 12, 2012


Today we know the molecular cause of 4,000 diseases, but treatments are available for only 250 of them. So what’s taking so long? Geneticist and physician Francis Collins explains why systematic drug discovery is imperative, even for rare and complex diseases, and offers a few solutions -- like teaching old drugs new tricks.

Elon Musk: The mind behind Tesla, SpaceX, SolarCity ...

TED2013

Elon Musk: The mind behind Tesla, SpaceX, SolarCity ...

February 28, 2013


Entrepreneur Elon Musk is a man with many plans. The founder of PayPal, Tesla Motors and SpaceX sits down with TED curator Chris Anderson to share details about his visionary projects, which include a mass-marketed electric car, a solar energy leasing company and a fully reusable rocket.

Hyeonseo Lee: My escape from North Korea

TED2013

Hyeonseo Lee: My escape from North Korea

February 28, 2013


As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was “the best on the planet.” It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope -- and a powerful reminder of those who face constant danger, even when the border is far behind.

Danny Hillis: The Internet could crash. We need a Plan B

TED2013

Danny Hillis: The Internet could crash. We need a Plan B

February 27, 2013


In the 1970s and 1980s, a generous spirit suffused the Internet, whose users were few and far between. But today, the net is ubiquitous, connecting billions of people, machines and essential pieces of infrastructure -- leaving us vulnerable to cyber-attack or meltdown. Internet pioneer Danny Hillis argues that the Internet wasn't designed for this kind of scale, and sounds a clarion call for us to develop a Plan B: a parallel system to fall back on if -- or when -- the Internet crashes.

Catarina Mota: Play with smart materials

TEDGlobal 2012

Catarina Mota: Play with smart materials

July 12, 2012


Ink that conducts electricity; a window that turns from clear to opaque at the flip of a switch; a jelly that makes music. All this stuff exists, and Catarina Mota says: It's time to play with it. Mota leads us on a tour of surprising and cool new materials, and suggests that the way we'll figure out what they're good for is to experiment, tinker and have fun.

Bono: The good news on poverty (Yes, there's good news)

TED2013

Bono: The good news on poverty (Yes, there's good news)

February 26, 2013


Human beings have been campaigning against inequality and poverty for 3,000 years. But this journey is accelerating. Bono "embraces his inner nerd" and shares inspiring data that shows the end of poverty is in sight … if we can harness the momentum.

Stewart Brand: The dawn of de-extinction. Are you ready?

TED2013

Stewart Brand: The dawn of de-extinction. Are you ready?

February 26, 2013


Throughout humankind's history, we've driven species after species extinct: the passenger pigeon, the Eastern cougar, the dodo ... But now, says Stewart Brand, we have the technology (and the biology) to bring back species that humanity wiped out. So -- should we? Which ones? He asks a big question whose answer is closer than you may think.

David Anderson: Your brain is more than a bag of chemicals

TEDxCaltech

David Anderson: Your brain is more than a bag of chemicals

January 18, 2013


Modern psychiatric drugs treat the chemistry of the whole brain, but neurobiologist David Anderson believes in a more nuanced view of how the brain functions. He illuminates new research that could lead to targeted psychiatric medications -- that work better and avoid side effects. How's he doing it? For a start, by making a bunch of fruit flies angry. (Filmed at TEDxCaltech.)

Dan Pallotta: The way we think about charity is dead wrong

TED2013

Dan Pallotta: The way we think about charity is dead wrong

March 1, 2013


Activist and fundraiser Dan Pallotta calls out the double standard that drives our broken relationship to charities. Too many nonprofits, he says, are rewarded for how little they spend -- not for what they get done. Instead of equating frugality with morality, he asks us to start rewarding charities for their big goals and big accomplishments (even if that comes with big expenses). In this bold talk, he says: Let's change the way we think about changing the world.