sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2014

Fabien Cousteau: What I learned from spending 31 days underwater

ファビアン・クストー: 水中で31日間を過ごして学んだこと

October 13, 2014

1963年にジャック・クストーは紅海の底に位置する水中の研究室で30日間を過ごしたことで、世界記録を樹立しました。今年の夏は、彼の孫にあたるファビアン・クストーがその記録を更新しました。若きクストーは、フロリダ州の海岸から1万4千キロ離れている水中の研究室「アクエリアス」で31日間を過ごしました。魅力的な講義で、驚くべき冒険を振り返ります。

Fabien Cousteau - Ocean explorer and environmentalist
Fabien Cousteau spent 31 days underwater to research how climate change and pollution are affecting the oceans. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I have a confession to make.
告白したいことがあります
00:13
I am addicted to adventure,
冒険にはまっています
00:16
and as a young boy,
子供の頃
00:19
I would rather look outside the window
時間の流れが淀んで
00:21
at the birds in the trees and the sky
時には死んでしまう
00:24
than looking at that two-dimensional
平面でチョークまみれの黒板より
00:27
chalky blackboard where time stands still
窓の外にいる
木に座っている鳥や
00:29
and even sometimes dies.
青空を見たかったんです
00:33
My teachers thought there was something wrong
授業に集中していなかった私は
00:35
with me because I wasn't paying attention in class.
先生から何か変だと
疑われてしまいました
00:37
They didn't find anything
specifically wrong with me,
左利きなので
少しだけ難読症ですが
00:41
other than being slightly
dyslexic because I'm a lefty.
それ以外は 特に異常は
見つかりませんでした
00:43
But they didn't test for curiosity.
しかし 医師たちは「好奇心」は
調べませんでした
00:47
Curiosity, to me,
私にとって「好奇心」とは
00:51
is about our connection
私達と世界や宇宙との
繋がりです
00:54
with the world, with the universe.
私達と世界や宇宙との
繋がりです
00:56
It's about seeing what's
around that next coral head
珊瑚礁や木々の向こう側を
00:59
or what's around that next tree,
探検することで
01:01
and learning more not only about our environment
自分たちの環境に限らず
自分たちについて
01:03
but about ourselves.
もっと知ることです
01:05
Now, my dream of dreams,
さて 私の最大の夢は
01:07
I want to go explore the oceans of Mars,
火星の海を探検することです
01:09
but until we can go there,
でも そこにたどり着けるようになる前に
01:13
I think the oceans still hold
地球の海には かなりの秘密が
01:15
quite a few secrets.
まだ隠れていると思います
01:19
As a matter of fact,
実際に
01:20
if you take our planet as the oasis in space that it is
我々の地球を宇宙のオアシスとして
01:22
and dissect it into a living space,
生活空間に割り当てると
その容積はー
01:25
the ocean represents over 3.4 billion
34億立方キロメートル以上で
01:29
cubic kilometers of volume, within which
私達は その内の
01:32
we've explored less than five percent.
5%以下しか探査していません
01:35
And I look at this, and I go, well,
それで私はこう考えました
01:39
there are tools to go
deeper, longer and further:
海中をくまなく探査する為の
手段はあります
01:42
submarines, ROVs, even Scuba diving.
潜水艦や遠隔操作無人探査機や
スキューバダイビングです
01:45
But if we're going to explore the final frontier
でも「地球の最後の未踏域」を
探検するなら
01:50
on this planet, we need to live there.
そこに住んでみるべきだ と
01:53
We need to build a log cabin, if you will,
言うならば 海底に
01:56
at the bottom of the sea.
丸太小屋を建てなければいけません
01:59
And so there was a great curiosity in my soul
そこで TED賞を受賞した
02:02
when I went to go visit a TED [Prize winner]
シルビア・アール博士を訪問すると
02:05
by the name of Dr. Sylvia Earle.
私の魂に好奇心が芽生えました
02:08
Maybe you've heard of her.
皆さんは彼女をご存知でしょう
02:09
Two years ago, she was staked out
二年前 アール博士は
02:11
at the last undersea marine laboratory
最後の海中の海洋研究室を
02:14
to try and save it,
保存するために
02:17
to try and petition
請願し
02:19
for us not to scrap it
廃棄させないように
02:21
and bring it back on land.
陸地に戻そうとしました
02:23
We've only had about a dozen or so
これまでに 海底の研究室は
02:25
scientific labs at the bottom of the sea.
12ヵ所程度しか存在せず
02:27
There's only one left in the world:
現在1ヵ所しか残っていません
02:29
it's nine miles offshore
場所は海岸から1万4千キロ離れ
02:31
and 65 feet down.
水深は20メートルです
02:33
It's called Aquarius.
「アクエリアス」と呼ばれています
02:35
Aquarius, in some fashion,
アクエリアスは
見方によっては
02:37
is a dinosaur,
まるで恐竜のようです
02:39
an ancient robot chained to the bottom,
海底に鎖で繋がれた
古代のロボットで
02:41
this Leviathan.
「レヴィアタン」です
02:43
In other ways, it's a legacy.
遺産ともいえます
02:47
And so with that visit, I realized
that my time is short
その訪問で気づいたのは
「アクアノート」のような
02:49
if I wanted to experience
経験をしたければ
02:52
what it was like to become an aquanaut.
人生は短いということでした
02:54
When we swam towards this after many
長きにわたる特訓と
02:59
moons of torture and two years of preparation,
二年間の準備の後
アクエリアスに向かうと
03:02
this habitat waiting to invite us
この住みかは
迎え入れてくれるように待ち構え
03:04
was like a new home.
新たな家のようでした
03:09
And the point of going down to
海底探索の目的とは
03:12
and living at this habitat was not to stay inside.
アクエリアスの中に
引きこもるわけではありません
03:15
It wasn't about living at something
the size of a school bus.
スクールバスの大きさの場所に
住むわけではなく
03:18
It was about giving us the luxury of time
外でさまよったり
03:21
outside to wander, to explore,
冒険したり
03:24
to understand more about this oceanic final frontier.
海中の最後の未踏域について
理解する時間を与えてくれました
03:27
We had megafauna come and visit us.
メガファウナも遊びに来てくれました
03:31
This spotted eagle ray is a fairly
common sight in the oceans.
このマダラトビエイは
海でよく見かける生き物です
03:34
But why this is so important,
でも この写真が大事な理由ー
03:37
why this picture is up,
この写真をお見せした理由は
03:40
is because this particular animal
brought his friends around,
このマダラトビエイは
他のトビエイを呼び寄せて
03:41
and instead of being the
pelagic animals that they were,
漂泳生物らしい行動をする代わりに
03:45
they started getting curious about us,
私達に興味を持ち始めたのです
03:48
these new strangers that were
moving into the neighborhood,
海底に引っ越してきて
浮遊生物を調べるような
03:49
doing things with plankton.
新しいお隣さんにです
03:53
We were studying all sorts of animals and critters,
様々な生物を観察していたところ
03:56
and they got closer and closer to us,
彼らは どんどん近づいてきたのです
03:58
and because of the luxury of time,
時間が沢山あったので
04:01
these animals, these residents of the coral reef,
これらの生物たちー
「珊瑚礁の住民」が
04:03
were starting to get used to us,
私達に慣れてきました
04:05
and these pelagics that
normal travel through stopped.
普段は通り過ぎてしまう
漂泳生物たちが近くに止まりました
04:07
This particular animal actually circled
このマダラトビエイは
04:10
for 31 full days during our mission.
ミッション中の全31日間
私達の近くを泳ぎ回っていました
04:13
So mission 31 wasn't so much
ミッション31の目的とは
04:17
about breaking records.
記録の更新ではありませんでした
04:19
It was about that human-ocean connection.
人間と海を繋ぐことが目的でした
04:21
Because of the luxury of time, we were able
時間が沢山あったからこそ
04:26
to study animals such as sharks and grouper
これまで見たこともないような
サメとハタの群れなどを
04:28
in aggregations that we've never seen before.
観察することができました
04:32
It's like seeing dogs and
cats behaving well together.
まるで 犬と猫が
仲良く遊んでいるみたいです
04:34
Even being able to commune with animals
我々より もっと大きな生物と
04:38
that are much larger than us,
接触することもできました
04:40
such as this endangered goliath grouper
例えば絶滅危惧種のイタヤラです
04:41
who only still resides in the Florida Keys.
フロリダ・キーズ以外には
生息していません
04:44
Of course, just like any neighbor,
もちろん人間の隣人と同じように
04:47
after a while, if they get tired,
しばらくして飽きられると
04:50
the goliath grouper barks at us,
イタヤラに吠えられます
04:52
and this bark is so powerful
この声は本当にパワフルで
04:54
that it actually stuns its prey before it aspirates it all
獲物を貪り食う前に
04:56
within a split second.
瞬く間に獲物を気絶させます
04:58
For us, it's just telling us to go back
私達には
「居住地に戻れ
05:00
into the habitat and leave them alone.
放っておいてくれ」
と言っているのです
05:02
Now, this wasn't just about adventure.
さて この探索は
単なる冒険ではありませんでした
05:06
There was actually a serious note to it.
重要な成果もありました
05:10
We did a lot of science, and again,
because of the luxury of time,
沢山の科学実験を行いましたし
時間的な贅沢があったからこそ
05:11
we were able to do over three years of science
3年かけて得られる科学的成果を
05:15
in 31 days.
31日で得ることができました
05:17
In this particular case, we were using a PAM,
今回の実験には
PAMを使いました
05:20
or, let me just see if I can get this straight,
「PAM」というのは
正しくはー
05:22
a Pulse Amplitude Modulated Fluorometer.
「パルス振幅変調蛍光光度計」です
05:24
And our scientists from FIU, MIT,
FIUとMIT
ノースイースタン大学にいる
05:28
and from Northeastern
私達の科学者が
05:31
were able to get a gauge for what coral reefs do
珊瑚礁の作用を測定することが
05:33
when we're not around.
できたのです
05:36
The Pulse Amplitude Modulated
Fluorometer, or PAM,
パルス振幅変調蛍光光度計
通称「PAM」で
05:38
gauges the fluorescence of corals
海水の汚染物質や
05:40
as it pertains to pollutants in the water
気候変動による問題と
関連づけることができる
05:43
as well as climate change-related issues.
珊瑚の蛍光性を測定します
05:45
We used all sorts of other cutting-edge tools,
他にも あらゆる最先端の機械を
使用しました
05:49
such as this sonde, or what I like to call
例えばこちらのソンデ
私の愛称は
05:52
the sponge proctologist, whereby the sonde
「海綿の肛門科医」です  
ソンデは自ら
05:54
itself tests for metabolism rates
生物の代謝率を測定することが出来ます
06:01
in what in this particular case is a barrel sponge,
例えば この巨大海綿の
06:03
or the redwoods of the [ocean].
別称は海のセコイアです
06:06
And this gives us a much better gauge
ソンデのおかげで
06:09
of what's happening underwater
海中で起こっていることー
06:10
with regard to climate change-related issues,
気候変動にまつわる問題や
06:12
and how the dynamics of that
地上への影響について
06:15
affect us here on land.
より正確に測ることが出来ます
06:17
And finally, we looked at predator-prey behavior.
最後に 捕食・被食関係を観察しました
06:20
And predator-prey behavior is an interesting thing,
捕食・被食関係はとても面白いんです
06:22
because as we take away some of the predators
世界の珊瑚礁にいる
06:24
on these coral reefs around the world,
捕食者を排除するとします
06:27
the prey, or the forage fish, act very differently.
すると被食者(餌になる魚)の
行動は大きく変わります
06:29
What we realized is
私達が気づいたのは
06:32
not only do they stop taking care of the reef,
被食者が珊瑚礁の世話ー
例えば 中に入って
06:34
darting in, grabbing a little bit of algae
少量の藻を摘んで
棲家に持ち帰るのを
06:37
and going back into their homes,
止めただけでなく
06:39
they start spreading out and disappearing
この珊瑚礁から立ち去り始め
06:41
from those particular coral reefs.
いなくなってしまうのです
06:43
Well, within that 31 days,
この31日以内に
06:45
we were able to generate over 10 scientific papers
このような各テーマごとに
10本以上の
06:47
on each one of these topics.
科学論文を作成することができました
06:50
But the point of adventure is not only to learn,
しかし 冒険の重要な点は
学ぶことだけではなく
06:53
it's to be able to share that
knowledge with the world,
得られた知識を世界と
共有できるということです
06:58
and with that, thanks to a
couple of engineers at MIT,
これに関しては
MITの2名の技術者のおかげで
07:00
we were able to use a prototype
camera called the Edgertronic
Edgertronicという試作品のカメラを
使うことができました
07:04
to capture slow-motion video,
スローモーションビデオで
07:07
up to 20,000 frames per second
毎秒2万フレームまで
撮ることができます
07:10
in a little box
小さな箱におさまりますが
07:13
that's worth 3,000 dollars.
3千ドルの価値があります
07:15
It's available to every one of us.
皆さんも購入することができます
07:16
And that particular camera gives us an insight
このカメラが私達に
もたらしてくれるのは
07:18
into what fairly common animals do
まばたきで見ることができない
平凡な生き物の行為をも
07:21
but we can't even see it in the blink of an eye.
映し出してくれることです
07:24
Let me show you a quick video
このカメラの性能について
07:26
of what this camera does.
短いビデオをご覧ください
07:28
You can see the silky bubble come out
硬いヘルメットから出てくる
07:30
of our hard hats.
滑らかな泡が見えますね
07:33
It gives us an insight
このカメラによって
07:35
into some of the animals that we were sitting
31日間 すぐ隣にいても
普段は無視してしまう
07:38
right next to for 31 days
いくつかの生物を
07:40
and never normally would have paid attention to,
観察することができました
07:42
such as hermit crabs.
例えばヤドカリです
07:45
Now, using a cutting-edge piece of technology
さて 海中専用ではない
07:47
that's not really meant for the oceans
最新の技術を使うのは
07:50
is not always easy.
いつも簡単なわけではありません
07:52
We sometimes had to put the camera upside down,
時にはカメラを逆さにしたり
07:54
cordon it back to the lab,
ケーブルで研究室に繋いで
07:56
and actually man the trigger
研究室からも
07:59
from the lab itself.
操作しています
08:02
But what this gives us
この技術がもたらしてくれるのは
08:04
is the foresight to look at and analyze
科学や工学の分野で
08:06
in scientific and engineering terms
人間の目ではとらえられない
08:09
some of the most amazing behavior
生き物たちの素晴らしい行動を
08:12
that the human eye just can't pick up,
調べたり分析できる力です
08:15
such as this manta shrimp
例えば このシャコです
08:16
trying to catch its prey,
約0.3秒以内で
08:19
within about .3 seconds.
獲物を捕まえようとしています
08:21
That punch is as strong as a .22 caliber bullet,
シャコのパンチは22口径の銃弾と
同じくらい強烈です
08:27
and if you ever try to catch a bullet
もし銃弾を掴もうとしても
08:30
in mid-flight with your eye, impossible.
人間の目では不可能なんです
08:31
But now we can see things
しかし このカメラで
08:35
such as these Christmas tree worms
イバラカンザシが
08:36
pulling in and fanning out
萎んだり広がるところが見えます
08:39
in a way that the eye just can't capture,
人間の目では捉えられない瞬間です
08:42
or in this case,
別の例は
08:45
a fish throwing up grains of sand.
砂を撒き散らしている魚です
08:47
This is an actual sailfin goby,
ホタテツノハゼという名前です
08:54
and if you look at it in real time,
実際にこの魚を前にすると
08:56
it actually doesn't even show its fanning motion
リアルタイムでは
ひれの動きは見えません
08:59
because it's so quick.
あまりに素早いからです
09:02
One of the most precious gifts
that we had underwater
水中で生活していた私達への
最高の贈り物の一つは
09:05
is that we had WiFi,
WiFiが使えたこと
このお陰で
09:07
and for 31 days straight we were able to connect
31日間ずっとインターネットに繋がり
09:09
with the world in real time
from the bottom of the sea
世界とリアルタイムで
海底からー
09:12
and share all of these experiences.
私達の体験を共有することができました
09:14
Quite literally right there
文字どおり海の底から
09:16
I am Skyping in the classroom
スカイプの
09:18
with one of the six continents
遠隔授業を6大陸の一つに対して行い
09:19
and some of the 70,000
students that we connected
総計7万人の学生に
毎日欠かさず
09:21
every single day to some of these experiences.
私達の体験を伝えたのです
09:24
As a matter of fact, I'm showing a picture that I took
これは私がスマートフォンで撮った
09:27
with my smartphone from underwater
海底にいるイタヤラの写真を
09:29
of a goliath grouper laying on the bottom.
学生に見せているところです
09:31
We had never seen that before.
こんな姿は見たことがありませんでした
09:34
And I dream of the day
私は海中都市が建てられる日を
09:39
that we have underwater cities,
夢見ています
09:41
and maybe, just maybe, if we push the boundaries
きっと 私達が冒険と知識の
09:43
of adventure and knowledge,
境界線を越えて
09:46
and we share that knowledge with others out there,
多様な者達と
知識を共有することができれば
09:48
we can solve all sorts of problems.
あらゆる問題を解決することが出来ると思います
09:51
My grandfather used to say,
私の祖父が言っていたものです
09:54
"People protect what they love."
「人間は愛するものを守る」と
09:56
My father, "How can people protect
そして父は
「人間が自分で分からないものを
09:59
what they don't understand?"
どうやって守れるだろう?」と言いました
10:01
And I've thought about this my whole life.
私は これについて
生涯をかけて考えてきました
10:06
Nothing is impossible.
不可能なことなんてない
10:10
We need to dream, we need to be creative,
私達は夢を持つべきで
クリエイティブであるべきです
10:14
and we all need to have an adventure
そして誰しも冒険が必要です
10:17
in order to create miracles in the darkest of times.
最も暗い時代に
奇跡を起こすために
10:19
And whether it's about climate change
気候変動でも
10:23
or eradicating poverty
貧困の削減でも
10:25
or giving back to future generations
私達が当たり前に享受してきたものを
10:28
what we've taken for granted,
未来の世代に返すことでも
10:29
it's about adventure.
全ては冒険から始まります
10:32
And who knows, maybe
there will be underwater cities,
誰にも分かりませんよ
海中都市もできるかもしれません
10:34
and maybe some of you
そして 皆さんの中から
10:37
will become the future aquanauts.
未来のアクアノートが
生まれるかもしれません
10:38
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
10:40
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:42
Translator:Jerry Yap
Reviewer:Mari Arimitsu

sponsored links

Fabien Cousteau - Ocean explorer and environmentalist
Fabien Cousteau spent 31 days underwater to research how climate change and pollution are affecting the oceans.

Why you should listen
For 31 days, from June 1 to July 2, 2014, Fabien Cousteau and a team of scientists and filmmakers lived and worked 20 meters below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean, at the Acquarius underwater science lab 9 miles off the coast of Florida. The intent of Mission31: study the life of and on the coral reef -- and the effects of climate change, acidification, and pollution, in particular by plastic debris and oil spills. But it was also a study of the scientists themselves spending extended time underwater. By stayigng down continuously, they collected the equivalent of several years of scientific data in just a month.

50 years ago Fabien Cousteau's grandfather, the legendary ocean explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, led a similar -- but shorter by one day -- expedition under the surface of the Red Sea. Since, we have explored only a very small portion of the oceans, less than 5 percent.
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.