English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TEDGlobal 2011

Paul Zak: Trust, morality -- and oxytocin?

ポール・ザック:信頼と道徳性、そしてオキシトシン

Filmed
Views 1,539,744

道徳的に正しい行いをしたいと駆り立てるものは何でしょうか?神経経済学者のポール・ザックは、安定した社会をつくるのに必要な信頼や共感などの感情に対してオキシトシン(彼は”道徳分子”と呼びます)が関わっていると考えられる理由を説明します。

- Neuroeconomist
A pioneer in the field of neuroeconomics, Paul Zak is uncovering how the hormone oxytocin promotes trust, and proving that love is good for business. Full bio

Is there anything unique about human beings?
人間に固有の特徴はあるのでしょうか?
00:15
There is.
あります
00:18
We're the only creatures
人間は 道徳感情を発達させた
00:20
with fully developed moral sentiments.
地球上の唯一の生き物です
00:22
We're obsessed with morality as social creatures.
私たちは 社会的動物として
道徳に高い関心を持ちます
00:24
We need to know why people are doing what they're doing.
私たちは
他の人の行動の理由を知りたがります
00:27
And I personally am obsessed with morality.
そして私は 個人的にも
道徳への思い入れがあります
00:30
It was all due to this woman,
ひとえにこの女性のおかげです
00:33
Sister Mary Marastela,
シスター・メアリー・マラステラ
00:35
also known as my mom.
私の母でもあります
00:37
As an altar boy, I breathed in a lot of incense,
私は教会で侍者をつとめ
お香をたっぷり浴び
00:41
and I learned to say phrases in Latin,
ラテン語の一節も覚えました
00:44
but I also had time to think
母の徹底した道徳感が
00:46
about whether my mother's top-down morality
全ての人にあてはまるのかどうか
00:48
applied to everybody.
考える時間もありました
00:50
I saw that people who were religious and non-religious
信仰心のありなしに関わらず
誰もが皆
00:52
were equally obsessed with morality.
道徳で頭がいっぱいだとわかりました
00:55
I thought, maybe there's some earthly basis
きっとこの世には道徳的決定のための
00:57
for moral decisions.
原理みたいなものが
あるのだろうと考えました
00:59
But I wanted to go further
また 脳が私たちを道徳的たらしめる
01:01
than to say our brains make us moral.
ということを
さらに突き詰めようとしました
01:03
I want to know if there's a chemistry of morality.
知りたかったのは道徳感の化学があるのか
01:05
I want to know
または道徳感の分子が
01:08
if there was a moral molecule.
存在するのかということでした
01:10
After 10 years of experiments,
10年以上の実験を経て
01:12
I found it.
それを発見したのです
01:14
Would you like to see it? I brought some with me.
ご覧になりたいですか?
用意してあります
01:16
This little syringe
この小さい注射器には
01:20
contains the moral molecule.
道徳に関わる分子が入っています
01:22
(Laughter)
会場-笑
01:31
It's called oxytocin.
オキシトシンというものです
01:34
So oxytocin is a simple and ancient molecule
オキシトシンは単純で古い分子で
01:36
found only in mammals.
哺乳類のみに見られます
01:39
In rodents, it was known
げっ歯類においては
01:41
to make mothers care for their offspring,
メスの子育てを促進し
01:43
and in some creatures,
別の生物においては
01:45
allowed for toleration of burrowmates.
同居する仲間の忍耐力を高めます
01:47
But in humans, it was only known
人間においては出産や授乳を
01:49
to facilitate birth and breastfeeding in women,
容易にし 
性行為の際に男女ともに
01:51
and is released by both sexes during sex.
分泌されるという事実のみが知られています
-しかし
01:53
So I had this idea that oxytocin might be the moral molecule.
私はこれが道徳に関わる分子だと考えました
01:57
I did what most of us do -- I tried it on some colleagues.
研究者なら誰でもするように
まずは同僚にぶつけたのです
02:00
One of them told me,
同僚の一人が言いました
02:03
"Paul, that is the world's stupidist idea.
「あまりにもひどいアイデアだ」
02:05
It is," he said, "only a female molecule.
「女性特有のホルモンが
02:08
It can't be that important."
それほど重要なはずがない」
02:10
But I countered, "Well men's brains make this too.
私は「男性の脳でも分泌される
02:12
There must be a reason why."
それには理由がある筈だ」と返しました
02:15
But he was right, it was a stupid idea.
けれども彼の言い分はもっともで 
確かにひどいアイデアでした
02:17
But it was testably stupid.
しかし 検証が可能なアイディアです
02:20
In other words, I thought I could design an experiment
つまり オキシトシンが
人の道徳感を養うのかを判断する
02:22
to see if oxytocin made people moral.
実験を考案できると思ったのです
02:25
Turns out it wasn't so easy.
けれども容易ではありませんでした
02:29
First of all, oxytocin is a shy molecule.
まずオキシトシンは見つけにくく
02:31
Baseline levels are near zero,
分泌が刺激されないと
02:34
without some stimulus to cause its release.
通常のレベルはほぼゼロなのです
02:36
And when it's produced, it has a three-minute half-life,
それにたった3分半で半減し
02:39
and degrades rapidly at room temperature.
常温ではすぐに壊れてしまいます
02:41
So this experiment would have to cause a surge of oxytocin,
実験ではオキシトシンを大量に分泌させ
02:44
have to grab it fast and keep it cold.
これを採取して冷凍保存すべきです
02:46
I think I can do that.
できるはずだと思いました
02:48
Now luckily, oxytocin is produced
幸運にもオキシトシンは
02:50
both in the brain and in the blood,
脳内と血液中でつくられるので
02:52
so I could do this experiment without learning neurosurgery.
脳手術を学ばなくても実験できるはずでした
02:55
Then I had to measure morality.
ところで私は道徳感を
測定しなければならないのでした
02:59
So taking on Morality with a capital M is a huge project.
「道徳感」の測定は
壮大なプロジェクトです
03:02
So I started smaller.
それで小さなことから始めました
03:05
I studied one single virtue:
「信頼」というひとつの徳から
03:07
trustworthiness.
研究を始めたのです 
―なぜなら
03:10
Why? I had shown in the early 2000s
2000年代の初めに
03:12
that countries with a higher proportion of trustworthy people
信頼できる人が多い国家は
03:15
are more prosperous.
より繁栄することを発表したからです
03:18
So in these countries, more economic transactions occur
こうした国では 経済活動が盛んで
03:20
and more wealth is created,
富が築かれ
03:23
alleviating poverty.
貧困が緩和されています
03:25
So poor countries are by and large low trust countries.
よって貧困国は信頼が低いと言えます
03:27
So if I understood the chemistry of trustworthiness,
ということは
信頼の化学を理解できれば
03:30
I might help alleviate poverty.
貧困の緩和に貢献できるかもしれません
03:33
But I'm also a skeptic.
しかし私自身も疑い深いのですが
03:35
I don't want to just ask people, "Are you trustworthy?"
「あなたは信頼できますか?」
とは聞きません
03:37
So instead I use
かわりに ジェリー・マグワイアばりに
03:39
the Jerry Maguire approach to research.
研究を行います
03:41
If you're so virtuous,
「もし道徳的であるなら
03:43
show me the money.
お金をください」
03:45
So what we do in my lab
実験では お金を使い
03:47
is we tempt people with virtue and vice by using money.
善悪をあぶり出すのです
03:49
Let me show you how we do that.
その方法を説明しましょう
03:51
So we recruit some people for an experiment.
まずは被験者を決め
03:53
They all get $10 if they agree to show up.
実験に参加したら10ドルを与えることにします
03:55
We give them lots of instruction, and we never ever deceive them.
まずは十分な説明を行い 決して騙しません
03:58
Then we match them in pairs by computer.
それからコンピューターでペアを作ります
04:01
And in that pair, one person gets a message saying,
ペアのひとりは
こんなメッセージを受け取ります
04:04
"Do you want to give up some of your $10
「実験参加の報酬10ドルのうちの―
04:06
you earned for being here
いくらかをこの実験室の誰かに
04:08
and ship it to someone else in the lab?"
あげたいと思いますか?」
04:10
The trick is you can't see them,
相手の姿が見られず
04:12
you can't talk to them.
話もできないということがミソです
04:14
You only do it one time.
受け渡しは一度だけです
04:16
Now whatever you give up
そして自分が手放したお金は
04:18
gets tripled in the other person's account.
他の人が3倍にして受け取ります
04:20
You're going to make them a lot wealthier.
相手の懐を豊かにするということです
04:23
And they get a message by computer saying
相手はこんなメッセージを
受け取ります
04:25
person one sent you this amount of money.
「ある人が●●ドルをあなたに送りました
04:27
Do you want to keep it all,
それをすべてキープしますか?
04:29
or do you want to send some amount back?
それともいくらかを相手に返しますか?」
04:31
So think about this experiment for minute.
この実験について少し考えてください
04:34
You're going to sit on these hard chairs for an hour and a half.
あと1時間半はこの固い椅子に座っています
04:36
Some mad scientist is going to jab your arm with a needle
うさんくさい科学者があなたの腕に
04:39
and take four tubes of blood.
注射針を刺し 
4本分の採血をします
04:41
And now you want me to give up this money and ship it to a stranger?
自分のお金を見ず知らずの人に
送ることをどう思いますか?
04:43
So this was the birth of vampire economics.
「吸血鬼経済学」の誕生でした
04:46
Make a decision and give me some blood.
決心したら採血いたします
04:49
So in fact, experimental economists
実験主義をとる経済学者は
04:52
had run this test around the world,
より大きな成果を求めて
04:54
and for much higher stakes,
この実験を世界中で行ってきました
04:56
and the consensus view
見解の総意としては
04:58
was that the measure from the first person to the second was a measure of trust,
最初の人Aから次の人Bへの実験は
他者への信頼感を計り
05:00
and the transfer from the second person back to the first
BからAへの実験はある人の信頼性を計ると―
05:03
measured trustworthiness.
されています
05:06
But in fact, economists were flummoxed
しかし経済学者たちは
05:08
on why the second person would ever return any money.
なぜBがAにお金を戻すのかと驚きました
05:10
They assumed money is good,
お金はすべてキープされて
05:13
why not keep it all?
しかるべきと思っていたわけです
05:15
That's not what we found.
実験結果はそうなりませんでした
05:17
We found 90 percent of the first decision-makers sent money,
90%の人が相手にお金を送り
05:19
and of those who received money,
受け取った人の95%が
05:22
95 percent returned some of it.
いくらかをまた
送り返すことがわかりました
05:24
But why?
なぜでしょう?
05:26
Well by measuring oxytocin
オキシトシンの量を測定すると
05:28
we found that the more money the second person received,
Bの受け取る金額が多いほど
05:30
the more their brain produced oxytocin,
より多くのオキシトシンが分泌され
05:32
and the more oxytocin on board,
分泌されるオキシトシンが多いほど
05:34
the more money they returned.
より多くのお金が
戻されるとわかったのです
05:36
So we have a biology of trustworthiness.
つまり信頼に関する生物学があるわけです
05:39
But wait. What's wrong with this experiment?
しかし この実験は何かおかしいですね?
05:42
Two things.
2つあります
05:45
One is that nothing in the body happens in isolation.
まず体内では独立して何も起こらないということです
05:47
So we measured nine other molecules that interact with oxytocin,
オキシトシンと相互作用する9つの
分子を測定しましたが
05:50
but they didn't have any effect.
何の効果も見られませんでした
05:53
But the second is
また オキシトシンと信頼の―
05:55
that I still only had this indirect relationship
直接的な関係性については
05:57
between oxytocin and trustworthiness.
実験結果から得られていないのです
05:59
I didn't know for sure
オキシトシンが信頼を生み出したことは
06:01
oxytocin caused trustworthiness.
まだ確かとは言えませんでした
06:03
So to make the experiment,
実験のためには
06:05
I knew I'd have to go into the brain
脳内のオキシトシンを―
06:07
and manipulate oxytocin directly.
直接操作する必要があったのです
06:09
I used everything short of a drill
ドリル以外のあらゆる手段で
06:11
to get oxytocin into my own brain.
脳にオキシトシンを送り込むことを
試みました
06:13
And I found I could do it
それで鼻吸入器なら
06:16
with a nasal inhaler.
可能だとわかったのです
06:18
So along with colleagues in Zurich,
チューリッヒの同僚たちと
06:20
we put 200 men on oxytocin or placebo,
200人の被験者にオキシトシン
06:22
had that same trust test with money,
もしくはプラシーボを注入し
06:24
and we found that those on oxytocin not only showed more trust,
同様の実験を行ったところ 
オキシトシンを吸入した被験者が
06:26
we can more than double the number of people
より多くの信頼を示すだけでなく 
通常より2倍の人が
06:29
who sent all their money to a stranger --
気分や認識を変えることなく
06:32
all without altering mood or cognition.
相手にすべてのお金を送ったのです
06:34
So oxytocin is the trust molecule,
つまりオキシトシンは信頼感の分子だと言えます
06:38
but is it the moral molecule?
ですが道徳感分子と言えるでしょうか?
06:42
Using the oxytocin inhaler,
オキシトシン吸入器を使って
06:45
we ran more studies.
さらに多くの研究を行いました
06:47
We showed that oxytocin infusion
オキシトシンの投与によって
06:49
increases generosity
この一方的にお金を
06:51
in unilateral monetary transfers
贈与する金額は
06:53
by 80 percent.
80%増大しました
06:55
We showed it increases donations to charity
慈善への寄付は
06:57
by 50 percent.
50%増大しました
06:59
We've also investigated
また薬物投与以外の方法で
07:01
non-pharmacologic ways to raise oxytocin.
オキシトシンを増加させることを試みました
07:03
These include massage,
マッサージ ダンス
07:05
dancing and praying.
祈りなどが有効でした
07:07
Yes, my mom was happy about that last one.
私の母は祈りで幸せだったのです
07:09
And whenever we raise oxytocin,
オキシトシンが増えると
07:12
people willingly open up their wallets
人はよろこんで財布を開け
07:14
and share money with strangers.
知らない人にも気前が良くなります
07:16
But why do they do this?
ですが なぜでしょう
07:18
What does it feel like
脳内でオキシトシンが分泌されると
07:20
when your brain is flooded with oxytocin?
どんな気持ちになるのでしょう
07:22
To investigate this question, we ran an experiment
この問いを明らかにするために
07:24
where we had people watch a video
父と末期がんの4歳の息子の
07:27
of a father and his four year-old son,
ビデオを被験者に見せるという
07:29
and his son has terminal brain cancer.
実験を行いました
07:31
After they watched the video, we had them rate their feelings
ビデオ鑑賞後 
被験者に感情を評価してもらいました
07:33
and took blood before and after to measure oxytocin.
ビデオの前後には血液を採取し
オキシトシンを測定しました
07:36
The change in oxytocin
オキシトシン量の変化から
07:39
predicted their feelings of empathy.
共感をどれほど感じているかわかりました
07:41
So it's empathy
共感こそが人を他者と
07:45
that makes us connect to other people.
結びつけるものです
07:47
It's empathy that makes us help other people.
共感こそが
私たちを人助けへと駆り立てるのです
07:49
It's empathy that makes us moral.
また共感があって
私たちは道徳的でありうるのです
07:52
Now this idea is not new.
この考えは新しいものではありません
07:56
A then unknown philosopher named Adam Smith
その当時無名の心理学者だった
アダム・スミスは
07:58
wrote a book in 1759
1759年に「道徳感情論」という
08:00
called "The Theory of Moral Sentiments."
書物を著しました
08:02
In this book, Smith argued
そこで 
-私たちが道徳的生物なのは
08:04
that we are moral creatures, not because of a top-down reason,
生まれついての性質ではなく
08:07
but for a bottom-up reason.
経験から学んだことだ
と述べています
08:10
He said we're social creatures,
また 我々は社会的生物であるので
08:12
so we share the emotions of others.
感情を他者と共有する 
とも言います
08:14
So if I do something that hurts you, I feel that pain.
ですからもし相手を傷つけると 
自分も苦しいので
08:16
So I tend to avoid that.
それを避ける傾向があります
08:19
If I do something that makes you happy, I get to share your joy.
もし相手を喜ばせたら 
それを自分も感じようとします
08:21
So I tend to do those things.
ヒトにはこういう傾向があります
08:24
Now this is the same Adam Smith who, 17 years later,
彼こそがその17年後に
08:26
would write a little book called "The Wealth of Nations" --
経済学の先駆的な著作「国富論」を
08:28
the founding document of economics.
著したあのアダム・スミスです
08:31
But he was, in fact, a moral philosopher,
実は彼は道徳を研究する心理学者で 
私たちが―
08:33
and he was right on why we're moral.
道徳的である理由について考えていたのです
08:36
I just found the molecule behind it.
それに関わる分子を発見したところです
08:38
But knowing that molecule is valuable,
分子について知ることは有用です
08:41
because it tells us how to turn up this behavior
いかにして道徳的行為が現れ
08:44
and what turns it off.
何がこれを消滅させるかがわかります
08:47
In particular, it tells us
特になぜ不道徳がー
08:49
why we see immorality.
現われるのかがわかります
08:51
So to investigate immorality,
不道徳について検討するために
08:54
let me bring you back now to 1980.
1980年に遡りましょう
08:56
I'm working at a gas station
私はカリフォルニアの
08:58
on the outskirts of Santa Barbara, California.
サンタバーバラ郊外の
ガソリンスタンドで働いています
09:00
You sit in a gas station all day,
一日中そんな所に座っていると
09:03
you see lots of morality and immorality, let me tell you.
様々な道徳や不道徳を目にします
09:05
So one Sunday afternoon, a man walks into my cashier's booth
ある日曜の午後 
一人の男性がきれいな宝石箱を手に
09:07
with this beautiful jewelry box.
レジへ歩いてきました
09:10
Opens it up and there's a pearl necklace inside.
箱を開けると真珠のネックレス―
09:12
And he said, "Hey, I was in the men's room.
「おい 男性トイレで―
09:14
I just found this. What do you think we should do with it?"
これを見つけたんだが 
どうしたらいいと思う?」
09:16
"I don't know, put it in the lost and found."
「さあ?忘れ物入れに置いておきますか」
09:19
"Well this is very valuable.
「いや これは高価だから
09:21
We have to find the owner for this." I said, "Yea."
持ち主を探すべきだ」
「確かに」
09:23
So we're trying to decide what to do with this,
どうするか考えていると
09:25
and the phone rings.
電話が鳴りました
09:27
And a man says very excitedly,
電話の相手は興奮して言いました
09:29
"I was in your gas station a while ago,
「妻に買ったジュエリーが見つからないんだ
09:31
and I bought this jewelry for my wife, and I can't find it."
少し前にそこにいたんだけど」
09:33
I said, "Pearl necklace?" "Yeah."
「真珠のネックレスですか?」
「そうだ」
09:35
"Hey, a guy just found it."
「見つけた人がいます」
09:37
"Oh, you're saving my life. Here's my phone number.
「助かった! 
これが俺の電話番号だ
09:39
Tell that guy to wait half an hour.
30分待つように伝えてくれ
09:41
I'll be there and I'll give him a $200 reward."
すぐ行って200ドルのお礼を渡したい」
09:43
Great, so I tell the guy, "Look, relax.
それはいいと思い
09:45
Get yourself a fat reward. Life's good."
「すごいです たっぷりお礼をしたいそうです」
と男に告げると
09:47
He said, "I can't do it.
彼は「まずいな
09:50
I have this job interview in Galena in 15 minutes,
15分後にガレナで採用面接の約束だ
09:52
and I need this job, I've got to go."
この仕事は大事だ 行かなければ」
と言いました
09:54
Again he asked me, "What do you think we should do?"
そして「どうしたらいいと思う?」
と聞きます
09:57
I'm in high school. I have no idea.
私はまだ高校生で 
どうすればいいかわかりません
09:59
So I said, "I'll hold it for you."
「僕が預かっておきましょうか?」
10:02
He said, "You know, you've been so nice, let's split the reward."
「お前もいいことをやったんだから 
その報酬を分けよう」
10:04
I'll give you the jewelry, you give me a hundred dollars,
「お前に預けておくから 
100ドルをくれないか―
10:07
and when the guy comes ... "
その人がやってきたら―」
10:09
You see it. I was conned.
おわかりですね 
私は騙されました
10:11
So this is a classic con called the pigeon drop,
これは信用詐欺という詐欺師の常套手段です
10:13
and I was the pigeon.
私はカモだったのです
10:16
So the way many cons work
つまり詐欺というのは
10:18
is not that the conman gets the victim to trust him,
詐欺師が相手に信じ込ませるのではなく
10:20
it's that he shows he trusts the victim.
相手のことを信じたように
みせかけることでうまくいくのです
10:23
Now we know what happens.
おわかりですね
10:26
The victim's brain releases oxytocin,
騙される人の脳内でオキシトシンが分泌され
10:28
and you're opening up your wallet or purse, giving away the money.
つい財布を開け 
お金をあげてしまうのです
10:30
So who are these people
こうしてオキシトシンを
10:33
who manipulate our oxytocin systems?
巧みに操作する人とは誰なのでしょう?
10:35
We found, testing thousands of individuals,
何千人もの人を調べると 
人口の5%の人は
10:38
that five percent of the population
刺激があっても
10:41
don't release oxytocin on stimulus.
オキシトシンを分泌しません
10:43
So if you trust them, their brains don't release oxytocin.
そんな人は信頼されても 
オキシトシンを分泌しません
10:47
If there's money on the table, they keep it all.
そこにお金があれば 
全部それを取ってしまいます
10:50
So there's a technical word for these people in my lab.
私の研究室で彼らを指す専門用語があります
10:53
We call them bastards.
「ドケチ」
10:55
(Laughter)
会場―笑
10:58
These are not people you want to have a beer with.
こんな人たちとは一緒に飲みたくありません
11:00
They have many of the attributes of psychopaths.
こうした人は
多くの精神病の特質も持っています
11:02
Now there are other ways the system can be inhibited.
オキシトシンの分泌系は多様な方法で―
11:06
One is through improper nurturing.
抑制されます 
ひとつは不適当な養育です
11:08
So we've studied sexually abused women,
性的虐待を受けた女性を調べてみると
11:11
and about half those don't release oxytocin on stimulus.
約半数は刺激されても
オキシトシンを分泌しません
11:14
You need enough nurturing
この分泌系をはぐくむには
11:17
for this system to develop properly.
きちんとした養育が必須です
11:19
Also, high stress inhibits oxytocin.
また極度のストレスはオキシトシンを抑制します
11:21
So we all know this, when we're really stressed out,
ご存じのとおり
11:24
we're not acting our best.
ストレス下では力を発揮できません
11:26
There's another way oxytocin is inhibited, which is interesting --
オキシトシンが抑制される
面白いケースがあります
11:29
through the action of testosterone.
それはテストステロンの働きによります
11:32
So we, in experiments, have administered testosterone to men.
実験で男性にテストステロンを投与すると
11:35
And instead of sharing money,
気前良くはならず
11:38
they become selfish.
自己中心的になります
11:40
But interestingly,
しかし面白いことに 
テストステロンの多い男性は
11:42
high testosterone males are also more likely
自己中心的な人を懲らしめるのに
11:45
to use their own money to punish others for being selfish.
大金をはたく傾向があります
11:47
(Laughter)
会場―笑
11:50
Now think about this. It means, within our own biology,
考えてみると 
私たちは生物学的に
11:52
we have the yin and yang of morality.
道徳感の陰陽を持っていると言えます
11:55
We have oxytocin that connects us to others,
体内には他者と繋ぐオキシトシンがあり
11:58
makes us feel what they feel.
共感を起こさせます
12:00
And we have testosterone.
一方でテストステロンもあります
12:02
And men have 10 times the testosterone as women,
男性には女性の10倍あります
12:04
so men do this more than women --
テストステロンの働きにより
12:06
we have testosterone that makes us want to punish
男性は女性よりも不道徳な人に
12:08
people who behave immorally.
厳しい傾向があるのです
12:11
We don't need God or government telling us what to do.
神や政府に指図されなくてもよいのです
12:13
It's all inside of us.
私たちの内面がそうさせるのですから
12:15
So you may be wondering:
それでも 
こう思うかもしれません
12:18
these are beautiful laboratory experiments,
「これはうまくいった実験の話で―
12:20
do they really apply to real life?
現実にはてはまるのか?」
12:22
Yeah, I've been worrying about that too.
私も気になっていました
12:24
So I've gone out of the lab
それで実験室外の日常生活で
12:26
to see if this really holds in our daily lives.
そう言えるかどうか確かめてみました
12:28
So last summer, I attended a wedding in Southern England.
去年の夏 
イギリス南部で結婚式に出席しました
12:30
200 people in this beautiful Victorian mansion.
ビクトリア朝風の大邸宅に200人が集まりましたが
12:33
I didn't know a single person.
知らない人ばかりでした
12:36
And I drove up in my rented Vauxhall.
借りたボクスホールで行きました
12:38
And I took out a centrifuge and dry ice
遠心分離機 ドライアイス
12:40
and needles and tubes.
注射針 チューブも持っていきました
12:42
And I took blood from the bride and the groom
宣誓の前とすぐ後の
12:44
and the wedding party and the family and the friends
花嫁と花婿 また家族や友人の
12:46
before and immediately after the vows.
血液を採取しました
12:48
(Laughter)
会場―笑
12:50
And guess what?
さて何がわかったでしょう?
12:52
Weddings cause a release of oxytocin,
結婚式はオキシトシンを分泌させます
12:54
but they do so in a very particular way.
けれどもそれには特色があります
12:56
Who is the center of the wedding solar system?
誰が結婚式の中心でしょうか?
12:59
The bride.
新婦です
13:01
She had the biggest increase in oxytocin.
新婦が一番オキシトシンを分泌していました
13:03
Who loves the wedding almost as much as the bride?
新婦と同じぐらい
結婚を喜んでいるのは誰でしょう?
13:05
Her mother, that's right.
その通り 新婦の母です
13:08
Her mother was number two.
新婦の母のオキシトシン量が二番目です
13:10
Then the groom's father, then the groom,
そして新郎の父 新郎
13:12
then the family, then the friends --
家族 友人と続きます
13:14
arrayed around the bride
太陽の周りの惑星のように
13:16
like planets around the Sun.
新婦の周りに配置されています
13:18
So I think it tells us that we've designed this ritual
つまり参列者と新婚夫婦―
私たち皆を感情的に
13:20
to connect us to this new couple,
結びつけるために
13:23
connect us emotionally.
こうした儀式を行ってきたのでしょう
13:25
Why? Because we need them to be successful at reproducing
なぜなら種の永続の為に 
新郎新婦が―
13:27
to perpetuate the species.
無事に子孫をつくっていくことが必要だからです
13:30
I also worried that my trust experiments with small amounts of money
また少額のお金を使って信用を調べる実験が
13:33
didn't really capture how often we actually trust our lives to strangers.
どれほど実生活で知らない人を
信じるかを言い当てられるか―
13:36
So even though I have a fear of heights,
不安でもありました
13:40
I recently strapped myself to another human being
最近 高度約3600メートルで
13:42
and stepped out of an airplane at 12,000 ft.
命綱をある人に預けて外へダイブし
13:44
I took my blood before and after,
その前後で採血しました
13:47
and I had a huge spike of oxytocin.
オキシトシンの大量分泌が見られたのです
13:49
And there are so many ways we can connect to people.
自分を他者と繋げる方法はいろいろあります
13:52
For example, through social media.
例えばソーシャルメディアを使って
13:55
Many people are Tweeting right now.
今多くの人がツイートしています
13:57
So we investigated the role of social media
ソーシャルメディアの役割を調べてみると
13:59
and found the using social media
その利用がオキシトシンの分泌量を
14:01
produced a solid double-digit increase in oxytocin.
大幅に引き上げることがわかったのです
14:03
So I ran this experiment recently for the Korean Broadcasting System.
先日 この実験を
韓国の放送局のために行いました
14:06
And they had the reporters and their producers participate.
参加者はレポーターとプロデューサーたちでした
14:09
And one of these guys, he must have been 22,
そのうちの一人の男性
―確か22歳でしたが
14:13
he had 150 percent spike in oxytocin.
150%オキシトシンが増量しました
14:15
I mean, astounding; no one has this.
驚きです 他の人では起こりませんから
14:18
So he was using social media in private.
そのとき彼は個人的に
ソーシャルメディアを使用していました
14:20
When I wrote my report to the Koreans,
報告書には「この男性が何をしているか
14:22
I said, "Look, I don't know what this guy was doing,"
わかりません」と書きましたが
14:24
but my guess was interacting with his mother or his girlfriend.
母親か恋人の関与を予想していました
14:26
They checked.
調べてみると 恋人と―
14:29
He was interacting on his girlfriend's Facebook page.
フェイスブック上でやりとりしていたのです
14:31
There you go. That's connection.
こういうことです 
これがつながりです
14:33
So there's tons of ways that we can connect to other people,
他者とつながる方法はいくらでもあります
14:36
and it seems to be universal.
世界中で共通のことでしょう
14:39
Two weeks ago,
2週間前 パプアニューギニアから
14:41
I just got back from Papua New Guinea
帰国しました
14:43
where I went up to the highlands --
ある高地を訪れていたのです
14:45
very isolated tribes of subsistence farmers
そこには農業で生計を立てる孤立した部族がいて
14:47
living as they have lived for millenia.
千年もの間そこに暮らしています
14:50
There are 800 different languages in the highlands.
高地には800ものの言語が存在し
14:53
These are the most primitive people in the world.
世界でも最も原始的な生活をする人々です
14:56
And they indeed also release oxytocin.
この人たちはオキシトシンを大いに分泌します
14:59
So oxytocin connects us to other people.
オキシトシンは私たちを他者とつなげます
15:02
Oxytocin makes us feel what other people feel.
オキシトシンは共感を高めます
15:06
And it's so easy to cause people's brains
また人の脳内でオキシトシンを放出させるのは
15:08
to release oxytocin.
非常に容易です
15:11
I know how to do it,
どうすればいいのかはわかっています
15:13
and my favorite way to do it is, in fact, the easiest.
私のお気に入りのやり方は最も簡単です
15:15
Let me show it to you.
お見せしましょう
15:17
Come here. Give me a hug.
さあ ハグしてください
15:24
(Laughter)
会場―笑
15:26
There you go.
こういうことです
15:28
(Applause)
会場―拍手
15:30
So my penchant for hugging other people
ハグがとても好きなので
15:39
has earned me the nickname Dr. Love.
私は「ドクターラブ」と呼ばれます
15:41
I'm happy to share a little more love in the world,
世界中であとほんの少し―
15:43
it's great,
愛を分け合えたらよいですね
15:45
but here's your prescription from Dr. Love:
ドクターラブから皆さんへの処方箋は
15:47
eight hugs a day.
1日8回のハグ
15:49
We have found that people who release more oxytocin
オキシトシンの量が多い人ほど
15:52
are happier.
幸せであるとわかっています
15:54
And they're happier
その理由はあらゆる人間関係を
15:56
because they have better relationships of all types.
より円滑に保てるからです
15:58
Dr. Love says eight hugs a day.
だからドクターラブは1日8回のハグをお勧めします
16:01
Eight hugs a day -- you'll be happier
ハグ8回で もっと幸せになり
16:04
and the world will be a better place.
世界はより良いものになるでしょう
16:06
Of course, if you don't like to touch people, I can always shove this up your nose.
他人に触れるのが苦手な人には
鼻からの注入もできます
16:08
(Laughter)
会場―笑
16:11
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:13
(Applause)
会場―拍手
16:15
Translated by RINAKO UENISHI
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Paul Zak - Neuroeconomist
A pioneer in the field of neuroeconomics, Paul Zak is uncovering how the hormone oxytocin promotes trust, and proving that love is good for business.

Why you should listen

What’s behind the human instinct to trust and to put each other’s well-being first? When you think about how much of the world works on a handshake or on holding a door open for somebody, why people cooperate is a huge question. Paul Zak researches oxytocin, a neuropeptide that affects our everyday social interactions and our ability to behave altruistically and cooperatively, applying his findings to the way we make decisions. A pioneer in a new field of study called neuroeconomics, Zak has demonstrated that oxytocin is responsible for a variety of virtuous behaviors in humans such as empathy, generosity and trust. Amazingly, he has also discovered that social networking triggers the same release of oxytocin in the brain -- meaning that e-connections are interpreted by the brain like in-person connections.

A professor at Claremont Graduate University in Southern California, Zak believes most humans are biologically wired to cooperate, but that business and economics ignore the biological foundations of human reciprocity, risking loss: when oxytocin levels are high in subjects, people’s generosity to strangers increases up to 80 percent; and countries with higher levels of trust – lower crime, better education – fare better economically.

He says: "Civilization is dependent on oxytocin. You can't live around people you don't know intimately unless you have something that says: Him I can trust, and this one I can't trust."

More profile about the speaker
Paul Zak | Speaker | TED.com