19:17
TEDGlobal 2009

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story

チママンダ・アディーチェ: シングルストーリーの危険性

Filmed:

我々の生活や文化は数々の話が重なり合って構成されています。作家のチママンダ・アディーチェは、どのように真の文化的声を探しだしたのかを語り、ある人間や国に対するたった一つの話を聴くだけでは、文化的な誤解を招く可能性があると指摘しています。

- Novelist
Inspired by Nigerian history and tragedies all but forgotten by recent generations of westerners, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novels and stories are jewels in the crown of diasporan literature. Full bio

I'm a storyteller.
私は作家です
00:12
And I would like to tell you a few personal stories
“シングルストーリーの危険性” と呼んでいる―
00:14
about what I like to call "the danger of the single story."
個人的なお話をいくつかしたいと思います
00:17
I grew up on a university campus in eastern Nigeria.
私は東ナイジェリアの大学キャンパスで育ちました
00:22
My mother says that I started reading at the age of two,
私が2歳から本を読みだしたと 母は言うけれど
00:26
although I think four is probably close to the truth.
実際は4歳が正しいでしょう
00:29
So I was an early reader, and what I read
そんな私が読んでいたのは
00:34
were British and American children's books.
イギリスやアメリカの子どもの本です
00:36
I was also an early writer,
文筆に親しみ始めたのも早く
00:39
and when I began to write, at about the age of seven,
7才頃にはクレヨンの絵付きで
00:42
stories in pencil with crayon illustrations
物語を書き始め
00:46
that my poor mother was obligated to read,
母に読ませたものでした
00:48
I wrote exactly the kinds of stories I was reading:
私が書くのは まさに私が読んでいたような話です
00:51
All my characters were white and blue-eyed,
登場人物はみな青い目をした白人
00:55
they played in the snow,
雪遊びをして
01:00
they ate apples,
リンゴを食べました
01:02
and they talked a lot about the weather,
(笑)
01:04
how lovely it was
そしてよくするのは天気の話
01:06
that the sun had come out.
太陽が顔を出してよかったね と
01:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:10
Now, this despite the fact that I lived in Nigeria.
実際は太陽がギラギラしてましたけどね
01:12
I had never been outside Nigeria.
当時 私は外国へ行ったことがありませんでした
01:15
We didn't have snow, we ate mangoes,
雪は降らないし 食べていたのはマンゴ
01:19
and we never talked about the weather,
太陽が照っているので天気が
01:22
because there was no need to.
話題になったこともありません
01:24
My characters also drank a lot of ginger beer
私の本の登場人物はジンジャービールもよく飲みました
01:26
because the characters in the British books I read
それがどんな飲み物か知らなかったけれど
01:29
drank ginger beer.
私が読んだイギリスの本の
01:31
Never mind that I had no idea what ginger beer was.
登場人物が飲んでいたからです
01:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:36
And for many years afterwards, I would have a desperate desire
その後何年もジンジャービールを
01:37
to taste ginger beer.
無性に飲んでみたかった
01:40
But that is another story.
でも その話はまた今度
01:42
What this demonstrates, I think,
これは物語に対する
01:44
is how impressionable and vulnerable we are
我々や 特に子どもの感受性の強さと
01:46
in the face of a story,
影響を受けやすさを
01:49
particularly as children.
立証していると思います
01:51
Because all I had read were books
私が読んだことのある本はどれも
01:53
in which characters were foreign,
登場人物が外国人だったので
01:55
I had become convinced that books
本とは本来 登場人物が外国人で
01:57
by their very nature had to have foreigners in them
私が感情移入することのできない―
01:59
and had to be about things with which
内容でなければならないと
02:02
I could not personally identify.
思い込んでいたのです
02:04
Things changed when I discovered African books.
アフリカの本を読んで 考え方が変わりました
02:07
There weren't many of them available, and they weren't
あまりアフリカの本は出版されておらず
02:11
quite as easy to find as the foreign books.
洋書ほど簡単に手に入りませんでした
02:13
But because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye
チヌワ アチェベやカマラ ライのような作家が
02:15
I went through a mental shift in my perception
私の文学に対する
02:19
of literature.
見方を変えたのです
02:21
I realized that people like me,
私のようにチョコレート色の肌をして
02:23
girls with skin the color of chocolate,
ポニーテールが出来ない―
02:25
whose kinky hair could not form ponytails,
縮れ髪の少女も
02:27
could also exist in literature.
登場人物になれるのです
02:30
I started to write about things I recognized.
私は自分が気づいた事を書き始めました
02:32
Now, I loved those American and British books I read.
私の想像力をかきたて 新しい世界を切り開いた―
02:36
They stirred my imagination. They opened up new worlds for me.
米国や英国の本は大好きでしたが
02:40
But the unintended consequence
文学には私のような人間も
02:44
was that I did not know that people like me
登場するんだと 知らなかったのは
02:46
could exist in literature.
意図せざる結果でした
02:48
So what the discovery of African writers did for me was this:
アフリカ人作家を知ったことで
02:50
It saved me from having a single story
本とは何であるかという―
02:54
of what books are.
シングルストーリーから救われました
02:57
I come from a conventional, middle-class Nigerian family.
私は普通のナイジェリアの中流階級出身です
02:59
My father was a professor.
父は大学教授で 母は
03:02
My mother was an administrator.
会社の理事をしていました
03:04
And so we had, as was the norm,
ですから 我が家には 普通に
03:07
live-in domestic help, who would often come from nearby rural villages.
たいてい近くの村から来る 住み込みのお手伝いがいました
03:10
So the year I turned eight we got a new house boy.
私が8歳になった年 新しい少年を雇いました
03:15
His name was Fide.
彼の名はフィデといい
03:19
The only thing my mother told us about him
母が彼について唯一教えてくれたのは
03:21
was that his family was very poor.
彼の家はとても貧しいということ
03:24
My mother sent yams and rice,
母は彼の家にヤム芋や米や
03:27
and our old clothes, to his family.
私たちの古着を送っていました
03:29
And when I didn't finish my dinner my mother would say,
ご飯を残すと母は言ったものです
03:32
"Finish your food! Don't you know? People like Fide's family have nothing."
“全部 食べなさい フィデの家族のような人は何もないのよ”
03:34
So I felt enormous pity for Fide's family.
フィデの家族を気の毒に感じました
03:39
Then one Saturday we went to his village to visit,
ある土曜日のこと 彼の村を訪ねたのです
03:43
and his mother showed us a beautifully patterned basket
フィデの兄が編んだヤシの葉の素敵なバスケットを
03:46
made of dyed raffia that his brother had made.
彼のお母さんが見せてくれて
03:50
I was startled.
私は驚きました
03:53
It had not occurred to me that anybody in his family
彼の家族が何かを作れるなんて
03:55
could actually make something.
思いもしなかったのです
03:58
All I had heard about them was how poor they were,
貧乏だとしか聞いてなかったので
04:01
so that it had become impossible for me to see them
それ以外のことと彼らを結びつけるのが
04:04
as anything else but poor.
私にはできなかったのです
04:06
Their poverty was my single story of them.
貧困は私が抱く彼らのシングルストーリーでした
04:09
Years later, I thought about this when I left Nigeria
何年もして私がアメリカの大学進学に
04:13
to go to university in the United States.
国を離れた際 この事を考えることになったのです
04:15
I was 19.
私は19歳でした
04:18
My American roommate was shocked by me.
アメリカ人のルームメイトは驚いて
04:20
She asked where I had learned to speak English so well,
私がどこで英語を身につけたのか尋ね
04:24
and was confused when I said that Nigeria
ナイジェリアの公用語は
04:27
happened to have English as its official language.
英語だと言うと困惑していました
04:29
She asked if she could listen to what she called my "tribal music,"
彼女は私の“部族音楽” を聴きたがって
04:34
and was consequently very disappointed
私がマライアキャリーのテープを見せると
04:38
when I produced my tape of Mariah Carey.
がっかりしていました
04:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:42
She assumed that I did not know how
彼女は私がコンロの使い方を
04:45
to use a stove.
知らないだろうと決め込んでいました
04:47
What struck me was this: She had felt sorry for me
顔を合わせる前から私に同情していたと
04:50
even before she saw me.
いうのには面を食らいました
04:52
Her default position toward me, as an African,
アフリカ人である私に対する彼女の
04:54
was a kind of patronizing, well-meaning pity.
標準的見解は憐みだったのです
04:58
My roommate had a single story of Africa:
彼女が抱くアフリカのシングルストーリーは
05:02
a single story of catastrophe.
アフリカの悲劇でした
05:05
In this single story there was no possibility
そのシングルストーリーでは
05:08
of Africans being similar to her in any way,
アフリカ人が彼女のようになれる訳もなく
05:10
no possibility of feelings more complex than pity,
憐みより複雑な感情はなく
05:14
no possibility of a connection as human equals.
人間として対等に見られていませんでした
05:17
I must say that before I went to the U.S. I didn't
私はアメリカへ行くまで
05:21
consciously identify as African.
アフリカ人という意識はなかったのです
05:23
But in the U.S. whenever Africa came up people turned to me.
私がナミビアのような場所を知らないにも関わらず
05:26
Never mind that I knew nothing about places like Namibia.
アメリカでアフリカと言えば 私に注意が向けられました
05:29
But I did come to embrace this new identity,
でも この新しい自我を受け入れるようになり
05:33
and in many ways I think of myself now as African.
今は様々な点で自分がアフリカ人だと思っています
05:35
Although I still get quite irritable when
アフリカが国だとみなされるのは
05:38
Africa is referred to as a country,
未だに頭に来ますけど…
05:40
the most recent example being my otherwise wonderful flight
2日前に乗ったラゴス発のヴァージン航空は
05:42
from Lagos two days ago, in which
快適でしたが チャリティーに
05:46
there was an announcement on the Virgin flight
関する機内放送があり
05:48
about the charity work in "India, Africa and other countries."
“インド アフリカ その他の国々” と言っていました
05:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:55
So after I had spent some years in the U.S. as an African,
アフリカ人としてアメリカで暮らしてみて
05:56
I began to understand my roommate's response to me.
ルームメイトの反応がわかるようになりました
06:00
If I had not grown up in Nigeria, and if all I knew about Africa
もしも 私がナイジェリア出身ではなく
06:04
were from popular images,
アフリカの知識をイメージから得ていたら
06:07
I too would think that Africa was a place of
私が持つ印象も 綺麗な景色や
06:09
beautiful landscapes, beautiful animals,
動物 そして無意味な戦争をする―
06:12
and incomprehensible people,
理解できない人たち
06:16
fighting senseless wars, dying of poverty and AIDS,
貧困とエイズで死んでいき
06:18
unable to speak for themselves
人々は意見も言えずに
06:21
and waiting to be saved
親切な白人の救いの手を
06:24
by a kind, white foreigner.
待っている と思っていたでしょう
06:26
I would see Africans in the same way that I,
子どもの頃 フィデの家族を
06:29
as a child, had seen Fide's family.
見ていたように アフリカ人を見ていたことでしょう
06:31
This single story of Africa ultimately comes, I think, from Western literature.
アフリカのシングルストーリーは結局のところ西洋文学から来ていると思います
06:35
Now, here is a quote from
1561年に西アフリカに航海して
06:39
the writing of a London merchant called John Locke,
興味深い旅の記述を残した
06:41
who sailed to west Africa in 1561
ロンドン貿易商のジョン ロックの
06:44
and kept a fascinating account of his voyage.
文章からの引用です
06:47
After referring to the black Africans
黒人のアフリカ人を
06:52
as "beasts who have no houses,"
“家なき野獣” とした後に
06:54
he writes, "They are also people without heads,
“彼らは頭がなくて 胸の中に
06:56
having their mouth and eyes in their breasts."
口と目がある人間である” と書いています
07:00
Now, I've laughed every time I've read this.
これを読むたびに笑ってしまいます
07:05
And one must admire the imagination of John Locke.
ジョンロックの想像力には脱帽です
07:07
But what is important about his writing is that
要は 彼の文章は
07:11
it represents the beginning
西洋で語られる
07:13
of a tradition of telling African stories in the West:
アフリカ伝承の発端を表しているのです
07:15
A tradition of Sub-Saharan Africa as a place of negatives,
報われぬ暗い場所のサブ サハラ アフリカ
07:18
of difference, of darkness,
素晴らしい詩人―
07:21
of people who, in the words of the wonderful poet
ラドヤード キップリングの言葉で言い現わすと
07:23
Rudyard Kipling,
“半分悪魔 半分子ども” の
07:27
are "half devil, half child."
人々がいる場所です
07:29
And so I began to realize that my American roommate
ルームメイトも生まれてからずっと
07:32
must have throughout her life
このシングルストーリーの
07:35
seen and heard different versions
違ったバージョンを見聞きしたに
07:37
of this single story,
違いないと気づき始めました
07:39
as had a professor,
私の小説を “真のアフリカ” ではないと
07:41
who once told me that my novel was not "authentically African."
言った教授もそうだったに違いないでしょう
07:43
Now, I was quite willing to contend that there were a number of things
私の小説の中には誤りや
07:48
wrong with the novel,
未熟な部分が多いのは
07:50
that it had failed in a number of places,
私も認めますが
07:52
but I had not quite imagined that it had failed
真のアフリカと呼ばれるものに
07:56
at achieving something called African authenticity.
見合わないとは想像もしませんでした
07:58
In fact I did not know what
真のアフリカとは何を指すのか―
08:01
African authenticity was.
私は知りもしませんでした
08:03
The professor told me that my characters
教授に 私が書く人物は
08:06
were too much like him,
彼のような学がある中流階級の
08:08
an educated and middle-class man.
男だと言われました
08:10
My characters drove cars.
車を運転して
08:12
They were not starving.
飢えに苦しんでいなかったゆえに
08:14
Therefore they were not authentically African.
"真のアフリカ" ではなかったのです
08:17
But I must quickly add that I too am just as guilty
でも 私もシングルストーリーに
08:21
in the question of the single story.
身に覚えがないとは言えません
08:24
A few years ago, I visited Mexico from the U.S.
数年前 アメリカからメキシコに行きました
08:27
The political climate in the U.S. at the time was tense,
当時 アメリカの政治風土は張り詰めており
08:31
and there were debates going on about immigration.
移民に関する議論がなされていたのです
08:33
And, as often happens in America,
アメリカではよく見られるように
08:37
immigration became synonymous with Mexicans.
移民はメキシコ人の類義語となりました
08:39
There were endless stories of Mexicans
メキシコ人が
08:42
as people who were
保健医療制度を悪用したり
08:44
fleecing the healthcare system,
こっそり国境越えをしたり
08:46
sneaking across the border,
国境で逮捕される人たちだという―
08:48
being arrested at the border, that sort of thing.
話には切りがありませんでした
08:50
I remember walking around on my first day in Guadalajara,
グアダラハラで過ごした初日に
08:54
watching the people going to work,
通勤する人たちを眺め
08:58
rolling up tortillas in the marketplace,
トルティーヤを食べ タバコを吸って
09:00
smoking, laughing.
楽しい時間を過ごしました
09:02
I remember first feeling slight surprise.
最初に少し驚いた記憶があり
09:05
And then I was overwhelmed with shame.
そして恥ずかしさで打ちのめされました
09:08
I realized that I had been so immersed
報道されるメキシコ人に
09:11
in the media coverage of Mexicans
どっぷりと浸かっていた自分は
09:14
that they had become one thing in my mind,
彼らをみじめな移民としか
09:16
the abject immigrant.
思っていなかったことに気がついたのです
09:18
I had bought into the single story of Mexicans
彼らのシングルストーリーを受け入れていた―
09:21
and I could not have been more ashamed of myself.
自分が恥ずかしくてたまりませんでした
09:23
So that is how to create a single story,
このようにシングルストーリーは
09:26
show a people as one thing,
作りだされるのです
09:28
as only one thing,
唯一のものとして
09:31
over and over again,
繰り返し人に見せられ
09:33
and that is what they become.
作られていくのです
09:35
It is impossible to talk about the single story
影響力を語らずにシングルストーリーを
09:38
without talking about power.
語ることはできません
09:40
There is a word, an Igbo word,
世界の権力構造を考える時に
09:43
that I think about whenever I think about
いつも思い出す “ンカリ” という
09:45
the power structures of the world, and it is "nkali."
イボの言葉があります
09:47
It's a noun that loosely translates
“他よりも偉大であること” と
09:50
to "to be greater than another."
意訳できる名詞です
09:52
Like our economic and political worlds,
経済や政治の世界のように
09:55
stories too are defined
物語もンカリの法則で
09:58
by the principle of nkali:
定義されます
10:00
How they are told, who tells them,
どのように 誰が
10:03
when they're told, how many stories are told,
いつ どれだけの話を語ったのか
10:05
are really dependent on power.
それは影響力に左右されます
10:08
Power is the ability not just to tell the story of another person,
影響力とはある人の話を語るだけではなく
10:12
but to make it the definitive story of that person.
その人の完全で正確な話を作る才能のことです
10:15
The Palestinian poet Mourid Barghouti writes
パレスチナの詩人曰く
10:19
that if you want to dispossess a people,
人々を追い出したければ
10:21
the simplest way to do it is to tell their story
一番簡単なのは “第二に” から始まる―
10:24
and to start with, "secondly."
彼らの話をすることです
10:27
Start the story with the arrows of the Native Americans,
物語の出だしを英国人の米国到達にせず
10:30
and not with the arrival of the British,
ネイティブアメリカンの矢にすると
10:34
and you have an entirely different story.
まったく違う話が出来上がります
10:37
Start the story with
物語の出だしをアフリカにおける
10:40
the failure of the African state,
植民地の成立にせず
10:42
and not with the colonial creation of the African state,
アフリカの問題点にすると
10:44
and you have an entirely different story.
まったく違う話が出来上がります
10:48
I recently spoke at a university where
最近 大学で講演をした際
10:52
a student told me that it was
学生が言ったんです
10:54
such a shame
ナイジェリアの男は私の本に
10:56
that Nigerian men were physical abusers
出てくる父親のように
10:58
like the father character in my novel.
身体的虐待をして残念だ と
11:01
I told him that I had just read a novel
私は「アメリカンサイコ」 を
11:04
called American Psycho --
最近読んだと彼に言い
11:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:08
-- and that it was such a shame
若いアメリカ人が
11:10
that young Americans were serial murderers.
連続殺人犯で残念だと返しました
11:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:19
Now, obviously I said this in a fit of mild irritation.
明らかに ちょっとした苛立ったもので
11:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:28
But it would never have occurred to me to think
主人公が連続殺人犯である―
11:30
that just because I had read a novel
小説を読むだけで
11:32
in which a character was a serial killer
その主人公がアメリカ人全体の
11:34
that he was somehow representative
代表になるとは 私は
11:36
of all Americans.
思いもしませんでした
11:38
This is not because I am a better person than that student,
私がその学生より賢いというのではなく
11:40
but because of America's cultural and economic power,
アメリカの文化的 経済的影響力のために
11:43
I had many stories of America.
私にはたくさんのアメリカの物語がありました
11:46
I had read Tyler and Updike and Steinbeck and Gaitskill.
タイラー アップダイク スタインベック ゲイツキルと読んでいたので
11:48
I did not have a single story of America.
アメリカのシングルストーリーはなかったのです
11:52
When I learned, some years ago, that writers were expected
何年か前 成功する作家というのは
11:55
to have had really unhappy childhoods
不幸せな幼年時代を送っていないと
11:58
to be successful,
だめだと聞いた時
12:02
I began to think about how I could invent
両親が私にした恐ろしい事を
12:04
horrible things my parents had done to me.
どうやって創作できるか考え始めました
12:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:08
But the truth is that I had a very happy childhood,
でも本当のところ 絆の強い家族の中で
12:10
full of laughter and love, in a very close-knit family.
笑い声と愛に満ちた幼年期を過ごしたのです
12:14
But I also had grandfathers who died in refugee camps.
しかし 難民収容所で亡くなった祖父もいましたし
12:17
My cousin Polle died because he could not get adequate healthcare.
いとこは十分な医療が受けられず亡くなりました
12:21
One of my closest friends, Okoloma, died in a plane crash
消防車に水が無く 私の親友は
12:25
because our fire trucks did not have water.
飛行機事故で亡くなりました
12:28
I grew up under repressive military governments
私は教育を重んじない抑圧的な
12:31
that devalued education,
軍事政権のもとで育ったので
12:34
so that sometimes my parents were not paid their salaries.
時々 両親の給料が支払われませんでした
12:36
And so, as a child, I saw jam disappear from the breakfast table,
ですから 当時はジャムが食卓から消え
12:39
then margarine disappeared,
次にマーガリンが消え
12:43
then bread became too expensive,
パンはとても高くなって
12:45
then milk became rationed.
牛乳が制限されるようになりました
12:48
And most of all, a kind of normalized political fear
何よりも日常化した政治的恐怖が
12:51
invaded our lives.
私たちの暮らしを侵略したのです
12:54
All of these stories make me who I am.
こういった話のすべてが今の私を作り上げます
12:58
But to insist on only these negative stories
しかし 否定的な話のみを強要するのは
13:00
is to flatten my experience
自分の経験を打ちひしぎ
13:04
and to overlook the many other stories
私を作り上げた他の話を
13:07
that formed me.
見落とすことになります
13:09
The single story creates stereotypes,
シングルストーリーは固定観念を作りだします
13:11
and the problem with stereotypes
固定観念の問題は
13:14
is not that they are untrue,
忠実でないことではなく
13:17
but that they are incomplete.
不完全だということです
13:19
They make one story become the only story.
ある話を “唯一の話” に変えてしまいます
13:21
Of course, Africa is a continent full of catastrophes:
確かにアフリカは不幸に満ちた大陸です
13:25
There are immense ones, such as the horrific rapes in Congo
コンゴで続く強姦のような測り知れない悲劇
13:27
and depressing ones, such as the fact that
ナイジェリアで一つの求人に
13:31
5,000 people apply for one job vacancy in Nigeria.
五千人が応募するような気の滅入る事実
13:33
But there are other stories that are not about catastrophe,
でも 不幸と関係のない話はあって
13:38
and it is very important, it is just as important, to talk about them.
それについて話すことも重要です
13:41
I've always felt that it is impossible
ある場所や人の話すべてに
13:45
to engage properly with a place or a person
関与せず それらに誤りなく関わるのは
13:47
without engaging with all of the stories of that place and that person.
不可能だといつも感じています
13:50
The consequence of the single story
シングルストーリーの結果は
13:54
is this: It robs people of dignity.
“人間の尊厳を奪う” のです
13:57
It makes our recognition of our equal humanity difficult.
我々人間の平等の認識を困難にします
14:00
It emphasizes how we are different
我々の類似点よりも
14:04
rather than how we are similar.
差異を強調します
14:07
So what if before my Mexican trip
もし メキシコ旅行の前に
14:09
I had followed the immigration debate from both sides,
アメリカとメキシコの両国側から移民の議論に
14:11
the U.S. and the Mexican?
注目していたらどうだったのでしょう?
14:15
What if my mother had told us that Fide's family was poor
もし 母がフィデの家族は貧乏だけど
14:17
and hardworking?
働き者だと教えてくれていたら?
14:21
What if we had an African television network
もし 異なるアフリカ人を世界中に紹介する
14:23
that broadcast diverse African stories all over the world?
アフリカのテレビ局があったとしたら?
14:25
What the Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe calls
ナイジェリア作家のチヌア アチェベが
14:29
"a balance of stories."
“物語のバランス”と呼んだもの
14:31
What if my roommate knew about my Nigerian publisher,
もし ルームメイトが 夢を追って
14:34
Mukta Bakaray,
銀行を辞め 出版社を立ち上げた―
14:37
a remarkable man who left his job in a bank
ナイジェリア人の
14:39
to follow his dream and start a publishing house?
ムクタ バカレーを知っていたら?
14:41
Now, the conventional wisdom was that Nigerians don't read literature.
世間一般の通念は ナイジェリア人は文学を読まないというものでしたが
14:44
He disagreed. He felt
バカレーの意見は違って
14:48
that people who could read, would read,
文学が手の届くものになれば
14:50
if you made literature affordable and available to them.
字が読める人は読むだろうという見解でした
14:52
Shortly after he published my first novel
彼が私の最初の本を出版してから間もなく
14:56
I went to a TV station in Lagos to do an interview,
私はラゴスのテレビ局でインタビューをされました
14:59
and a woman who worked there as a messenger came up to me and said,
そこで働く伝言係の女性が言ったんです
15:02
"I really liked your novel. I didn't like the ending.
“小説とても良かったけど 最後が気に入らなかった
15:05
Now you must write a sequel, and this is what will happen ..."
続編はこうやって書いてほしいの”
15:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:11
And she went on to tell me what to write in the sequel.
そして彼女は続編で書くべき点を話し続けたのです
15:14
I was not only charmed, I was very moved.
魅せられるだけではなく 感動しました
15:17
Here was a woman, part of the ordinary masses of Nigerians,
読書をしないはずの ごく普通のナイジェリア人に
15:20
who were not supposed to be readers.
こんな女性がいたなんて!
15:23
She had not only read the book, but she had taken ownership of it
本を読むだけではなく 続編に
15:26
and felt justified in telling me
書きつづる内容を 私に伝える
15:28
what to write in the sequel.
使命を彼女は果たしたのです
15:31
Now, what if my roommate knew about my friend Fumi Onda,
もし 我々の過去の悪事を
15:33
a fearless woman who hosts a TV show in Lagos,
隠さず話す テレビ司会者の我が友を
15:37
and is determined to tell the stories that we prefer to forget?
ルームメイトが知っていたら?
15:40
What if my roommate knew about the heart procedure
もし 先週ラゴスで行われた心臓手術について
15:43
that was performed in the Lagos hospital last week?
ルームメイトが知っていたら?
15:47
What if my roommate knew about contemporary Nigerian music,
もし 彼女がナイジェリアの現代音楽を知っていたら?
15:50
talented people singing in English and Pidgin,
ジェイZ フェラクティ ボブマーリー 自らの祖父から
15:54
and Igbo and Yoruba and Ijo,
受けた影響を混ぜ込みながら
15:57
mixing influences from Jay-Z to Fela
英語 混成語 イボ語 ヨルバ語 イジョ語で歌う
15:59
to Bob Marley to their grandfathers.
才能ある人たち
16:03
What if my roommate knew about the female lawyer
女性がパスポートの切り替えをするには
16:06
who recently went to court in Nigeria
夫の同意が必要だという
16:08
to challenge a ridiculous law
バカげた法律について 最近
16:10
that required women to get their husband's consent
ナイジェリアの裁判所に異議申し立てした
16:12
before renewing their passports?
女性弁護士をもしルームメイトが知っていたら?
16:15
What if my roommate knew about Nollywood,
もし 技術的ハンデにも関わらずナリウッド映画を
16:18
full of innovative people making films despite great technical odds,
制作する革新的な人々をルームメイトが知っていたら?
16:21
films so popular
映画はとても人気があって
16:25
that they really are the best example
ナイジェリア人が自ら生み出した―
16:27
of Nigerians consuming what they produce?
製品を消費している最高の例なのです
16:29
What if my roommate knew about my wonderfully ambitious hair braider,
もし エクステンションを売る仕事を始めた―
16:32
who has just started her own business selling hair extensions?
野心ある私の髪編み師や 起業して
16:35
Or about the millions of other Nigerians
時に失敗しても 野心を
16:39
who start businesses and sometimes fail,
抱き続ける何百万人もの
16:41
but continue to nurse ambition?
ナイジェリア人を ルームメイトが知っていたら?
16:43
Every time I am home I am confronted with
私は帰省すると ナイジェリア人の
16:47
the usual sources of irritation for most Nigerians:
苛立ちの原因であるインフラや
16:49
our failed infrastructure, our failed government,
政府の問題点にいつも直面します
16:52
but also by the incredible resilience of people who
でも そんな政府にも関わらず
16:55
thrive despite the government,
元気な人々の驚くべき回復力も
16:58
rather than because of it.
感じられます
17:01
I teach writing workshops in Lagos every summer,
私は毎夏 ラゴスで文章の書き方を教えています
17:03
and it is amazing to me how many people apply,
どれだけ多くの人が申し込んで
17:06
how many people are eager to write,
執筆したがっているか―
17:09
to tell stories.
驚くばかりです
17:12
My Nigerian publisher and I have just started a non-profit
出版社と私はFarafina Trust という
17:14
called Farafina Trust,
NPOを立ち上げました
17:17
and we have big dreams of building libraries
我々の大きな夢は 新しく図書館を建て
17:19
and refurbishing libraries that already exist
古いものは改修工事をして
17:22
and providing books for state schools
空っぽの公立学校には
17:24
that don't have anything in their libraries,
本を寄贈したいのです
17:27
and also of organizing lots and lots of workshops,
そして自分たちの物語を語りたいと
17:29
in reading and writing,
思っている全ての人へ
17:31
for all the people who are eager to tell our many stories.
読書や執筆の研究会を開きたいのです
17:33
Stories matter.
物語の影響は大きいのです
17:36
Many stories matter.
様々な物語がなくてはなりません
17:38
Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign,
物語は略奪と中傷に使われてきましたが
17:40
but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize.
物語とは人に力を与え人間味を与えることも出来るのです
17:44
Stories can break the dignity of a people,
物語は人の尊厳を砕くことができますが
17:48
but stories can also repair that broken dignity.
打ち砕かれた尊厳を修復する力も持っています
17:51
The American writer Alice Walker wrote this
米国人作家 アリス ウォーカーは
17:56
about her Southern relatives
南部から北部に移り住んだ
17:58
who had moved to the North.
親戚に関し本を書いています
18:00
She introduced them to a book about
彼女は終止符を打った南部の生活が
18:02
the Southern life that they had left behind:
書かれた本を その親戚に紹介したのです
18:04
"They sat around, reading the book themselves,
“彼らはのんびりと読書をしたり
18:07
listening to me read the book, and a kind of paradise was regained."
私の朗読を聴いた そして一種の理想郷が取り戻された”
18:11
I would like to end with this thought:
私からのメッセージです
18:17
That when we reject the single story,
我々がシングルストーリーを退けて
18:20
when we realize that there is never a single story
いかなる場所にもシングルストーリーなど
18:23
about any place,
無いと気づいたとき
18:26
we regain a kind of paradise.
一種の理想郷を取り戻します
18:28
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
18:30
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:32
Translated by Takako Sato
Reviewed by Masahiro Kyushima

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie - Novelist
Inspired by Nigerian history and tragedies all but forgotten by recent generations of westerners, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novels and stories are jewels in the crown of diasporan literature.

Why you should listen

In Nigeria, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's novel Half of a Yellow Sun has helped inspire new, cross-generational communication about the Biafran war. In this and in her other works, she seeks to instill dignity into the finest details of each character, whether poor, middle class or rich, exposing along the way the deep scars of colonialism in the African landscape.

Adichie's newest book, The Thing Around Your Neck, is a brilliant collection of stories about Nigerians struggling to cope with a corrupted context in their home country, and about the Nigerian immigrant experience.

Adichie builds on the literary tradition of Igbo literary giant Chinua Achebe—and when she found out that Achebe liked Half of a Yellow Sun, she says she cried for a whole day. What he said about her rings true: “We do not usually associate wisdom with beginners, but here is a new writer endowed with the gift of ancient storytellers.”

More profile about the speaker
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie | Speaker | TED.com